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YouTube cofounder slams decision to force Google+ on YouTube users

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by sparkyscott21, Nov 9, 2013.

  1. sparkyscott21

    sparkyscott21 Moderator Staff Member

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    Count YouTube cofounder Jawed Karim among those who’s not a fan of forcing YouTube commenters to have a Google+ account. As The Guardian notes, Karim this week posted a comment on his YouTube page asking “why the f— do I need a Google+ account to comment on a video?” Google has claimed that it’s requiring commenters to have Google+ accounts to help them “see posts at the top of the list from the video’s creator, popular personalities, engaged discussions about the video, and people in your Google+ Circles,” and thus deliver a more personalized experience. Even so, Google’s assurance that the new comments system is being put in place for users’ benefit is unlikely to quell critics who think the company is cynically trying to find yet another sneaky way to foist Google+ on everyone.




    11-9-13

    bgr.com
     
  2. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    Google feels social media would be improved by eliminating anonymity, and given the typical comments attached by YouTube users, I can't disagree.
     
  3. Carlszone

    Carlszone Well-Known Member

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    Bull!

    Google Plus is an additional service for those sycophants that are natural Google enthusiasts. Like w/MSN, AOL, and other internet services that link our e-mail addresses & accts to single user websites, we still have the right to restrict data that so easily ties into our real live & identities. The question remains, why do they want to know who we really are? Aren't the Gmail ads that use our E-mail content enough? Geeze, they really wanna know us, huh?

    Why...

    Carl
     
  4. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    Because it's cheaper than hiring moderators to cleanup the garbage left behind by anonymous users in the social networks? If you prefer to think there's something more to it ... that perhaps Google is going to earn more ad $$$ by tying our video viewing/posting choices to our real names ... well ... more power to them, I guess. Someone has to pay their bills.
     
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Funny -;)


    YouTube Commenters Invade Conan's Audience:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
  6. mrspock

    mrspock Active Member

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    Doesn't it result in more junk Google+ accounts created specifically for commenting on YouTube
     
  7. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    YouTube strives to crack down on comment spam | Internet & Media - CNET News (click for full article)

    by Lance Whitney - Nov. 26, 2013

    -- YouTube's new comment system was getting bitten by a rise in spam, but the company is fighting back.

    In a blog posted late Monday, the YouTube comments team acknowledged the increase in comment spam since revamping the format a couple of weeks ago. The change was designed to cut down on anonymous and frivolous comments by requiring commenters to use their Google+ names. But the move showed that people can be jerks even under their own names and actually triggered a surge in spam.

    In response, the comments team launched three updates to try to combat the problem, notably better recognition of bad links and impersonation attempts, improved ASCII art detection, and a change in how long comments are displayed.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2013

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