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YouTube: 2 billion views per day

Discussion in 'More News from Your Google TV News Team' started by Rickaren, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    March 10, 2011,

    Google plans to boost YouTube staff over 30%


    By John Letzing



    SAN FRANCISCO — Google Inc., the Internet giant that has declared 2011 will be a record hiring year for the company, said Thursday that it plans to increase staff at its YouTube video unit by more than 30%.


    That increase, said YouTube HR executive Jeff Ferguson in a post on a company website, will make 2011 “the largest hiring year in YouTube’s history.”



    Ferguson noted that 35 hours of video is uploaded to YouTube every minute, “and we see well over 2 billion views a day.”



    Google does not disclose YouTube’s financial data, including whether or not the unit has become profitable.



    Google acquired YouTube for $1.65 billion in 2006, when the start-up was still only about two years old, and was composed overwhelmingly of homemade video clips.



    Since then, Google has deployed a number of advertising formats on YouTube, and begun using it to offer film and TV show rentals. Google may also reportedly begin streaming professional sports events on the service.



    YouTube was hit by a $1 billion lawsuit in 2007, filed by media giant Viacom Inc. for alleged copyright infringement. Google won a decision in the case last summer, though Viacom has filed an appeal.



    Google, which operates the dominant online search engine and has seen its annual revenue grow to roughly $30 billion, announced in January that it plans to hire more than 6,000 employees this year, an increase of roughly 25%.

     
  2. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Sun 13 Mar 2011

    YouTube boss wants to deliver a 'personalised channel' and repeat what cable did to the TV networks


    Noel Young UK


    How do you fancy a video channel of your very own, tailored to your idiosyncratic likes and dislikes, with none of the distractions of your partner's preference for golf or cooking shows?


    That is the part of the vision of the new boss of YouTube, Salar Kamangar, who became CEO in October after YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley left the company now owned by Google.

    In a rare interview, Kamangar sat down with the San Jose Mercury News at YouTube's headquarters in San Bruno, California to talk about the future of the third most visited site on the internet.


    "We want to move YouTube from being a site that's organized around individual videos to one that's organized around sets of videos," he said.


    "Think about that as channels, and you can think about that as two different kinds of channels.


    "We want to deliver a personalized stream of videos for you that is specific to what you are interested in. That is one kind of channel -- the personalized channel."
    The other kind of channel, said Kamangar, was more traditional. He pointed out that in the early '80s, you had three or four TV networks. Today those three or four networks are responsible for just 25 percent of viewership: the cable networks are responsible for all the rest.


    "When you think about the impact cable had, we think we're in a position to have a similar impact for video delivery," said Kamangar.


    Right now, the fraction of traffic that is web video is small relative to broadcast and cable, "but it's growing at a fast rate. What's amazing is that the Web enables you to build a kind of channel that wouldn't have made sense for cable, in the same way cable enabled you to build content that wouldn't have made sense for broadcast.
    "You couldn't have done CNN with the broadcast networks; you couldn't have done MTV with the broadcast networks."

    Kamangar, an Iranian American, was Google's ninth employee. He led the team that created AdWords, the search keyword advertising programme that remains Google's largest single source of revenue. He wrote the company's first business plan, started its early legal and finance functions, and helped found Google's product team.
    Google bought YouTube, founded in February 2005, for $1.65 billion in November 2006. It was quite a buy! One year later, as the site powered ahead, it was estimated that YouTube consumed as much bandwidth as the entire Internet in 2000.

    In May last year, more than 14 billion videos were viewed, a monthly figure bound to be substantially higher now. YouTube says 35 hours of new videos are uploaded every minute - around three quarters from outside the US .

    About two years ago, Kamangar moved over to YouTube, becoming the video site's CEO in October.

    Samangar talked about how YouTube fits into the rest of Google.
    "We'd like to think of YouTube as a part of Google, with very overlapping goals and values. We're a fundamental part of the advertising business for Google. There is search and there is display and there is video. And when you think about where the big opportunity is on the advertising side, you think YouTube and video is a very large part of that.

    "We are very integral to Google's strategic goals, but we're also able to do things in a way that makes sense for the YouTube brand and culture for users. We're trying to find the right balance -- the details matter a lot -- but I think what we're heading toward and what we benefit from is both being a space where we can think and run like a startup, and at the same time being able to draw on the great resources of Google."

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