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Who Still Uses Flash Video? Just About Everybody

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Who Still Uses Flash Video? Just About Everybody - Streaming Media Magazine (click for full article)

    Despite all the attention HTML5 video has gotten, informal testing shows that most sites don't see a competitive benefit to leaving Flash.

    By Jan Ozer


    "So there I was, a chapter due on my next book on live streaming, and a column due for Streaming Media. Which to tackle first, I pondered.


    The chapter is on lighting for live event streaming. I have my own thoughts on the best -- or at least safest -- course for this: flat lighting all the way. But rather than inflict my own, overly conservative thoughts on my readers, I figured I'd do a little research. You know, check out the top 15 or so news-oriented sites and see how they light their sets. Then check out tech video broadcasting sites, such as Revision3 and CNET. Then check out some corporations who use video intensively, such as Apple and HP, and see what they're doing.


    But what about the column, I thought? Can't let ol' Eric down, at least not for too long. Then it hit me. While checking for lighting style I could see if HTML5 has made any inroads into these high-profile markets. You know, visit the site in Google Chrome, find a talking head video, right-click to see what technology is playing the video, and at the same time, note whether it used flat or shadowed lighting. Surely, I thought, if Adobe dropped Flash from the name of Adobe Media Server 5, large sites must be dropping Flash faster than Disney dropped the Jonas Brothers.


    To verify my test methodology, I visited Revision3's Tekzilla show, right-clicked, and saw no mention of Flash Player. No surprise there, since Revision3 announced that it was transitioning to HTML5 last November. Same result at Apple, which appeared to be using HTML5, and Microsoft, of course, which uses Silverlight.


    Who else was using HTML5? Well, I started with media sites such as the three-letter networks, other news services, sports sites, and the like, checking 14 of the largest. All used Flash. Then I checked 15 of the top user-generated content (Vimeo, YouTube, Videojug) and video training sites (WordPress.tv, CBT Cafe, Tutorial Paradise), and they were all Flash as well. Sure, you could opt into the HTML5 program in YouTube and Vimeo, but Flash was the default player.


    Then I checked other technology sites, such as Oracle, HP, and Cisco -- all Flash. Then I checked some investment houses, such as Vanguard, J.P. Morgan, and Goldman Sachs -- all Flash. Then I checked the first 10 of Forbes magazine's list of top 100 innovative companies, which included Salesforce.com, Hindustan Unilever, Monsanto, and Starbucks -- all Flash. Then I checked a list of top consulting companies from Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, which included Bain, The Boston Consulting Group, Deloitte, and Accenture -- Flash, Flash, Flash, and Flash.


    Basically, other than Revision3, unless the company had some technology skin in the game, such as Apple and Microsoft, it used Flash. These sites, which include many that live or die based on the quality and deliverability of their video, apparently don't perceive that HTML5 can deliver any competitive benefit that Flash can't."
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2012
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Sure, Flash is dead. But are the Web video wars over? |... (click for full article)

    THE GREAT DEBATE SERIES

    Sure, Flash is dead. But are the Web video wars over?

    Moderated by Lawrence Dignan | August 20, 2012 -- 07:00 GMT (00:00 PDT)

    Summary: Or will HTML5 make them irrelevant?

    Opening arguments for this debate will be delivered Monday, August 20 at 7:00AM PT / 10:00AM ET. Also, follow the action in real-time as our debaters present their rebuttals -- live -- on Tuesday, 8:00AM PT / 11:00AM ET.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Opening Statements

    Video wars...who cares?

    Chris Dawson: Web video wars? Does anyone besides the web video teams at Google, Apple, and Microsoft actually care? HTML5 already supports the majority of competing codecs across most browsers. Sure, Google continues to posture with WebM, Apple is the poster child for vendor lock-in, and Microsoft continues to struggle for relevance on the Web; Mozilla is just trying to figure out who to follow.

    I don't lay awake at night wondering which standard I should use to encode the videos I produce (and I produce a lot of them). The HTML5 tag solves a whole lot of problems by letting web browsers display whatever they support. 8-core processors solve even more by making multiple renderings of web videos in different formats trivial.

    In the end, multiple codecs will grumpily coexist, made largely into religious issues for developers by HTML5, and, as long as they can watch YouTube and Netflix, ignored by users.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Flash, as alive as ever

    Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Yes, we all hate Flash. Even Adobe's not that crazy about it anymore. Too bad. There's still no replacement for it.
    HTML5 video you say? What about it?

    HTML5's video tag doesn't define which file format, such as MPEG4 or WebM, or video or audio codec, such as H.264 or VP8, are permitted. All HTML5 does is let Web developers set up case statements so that they can supply a choice of various combinations of containers and codecs in the hope that your device can support one of them.

    In other words, HTML5 video is just a rug that covers the dirt of multiple video formats. It doesn't replace Flash at all. In fact, you can still use Flash within it. We're a long way from being Flash free.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2012
  3. Spidershowl11

    Spidershowl11 New Member

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    The war isn't over, but it isn't heating up either. HTML5 is the future but its adoption by people and developers will be slow. I still don't understand why Flash is presented as the first option on the desktop even for HTML5 compatible browsers?
     

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