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Wake Up And Smell The Chrome

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Aug 11, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Wake up and smell the Chrome | Computerworld Blogs (click for full article)

    "By Michael Horowitz August 09, 2012 8:50 PM EDT 18 Comments


    While reading Fred Langa's recent article about tune-up software in the Windows Secrets newsletter, I almost hit the floor.


    Recently, I've been using a Google/Samsung Chromebook and Langa's article crystallized the difference between computing with Windows and Chrome OS (the operating system that runs Chromebooks and Chromeboxes).


    The phrase "night and day", doesn't do it justice.


    Fred Langa is a Windows guy and his article is well done and useful - to Windows users. But, to someone willing to think out of the box, to see the forest rather than just trees, its an eye-opener to how crude and rickety Windows is.


    I wasn't so much interested in the results of Langa's software testing as the description of how he maintains his Windows computer. He detailed his routine to make it clear that there shouldn't be any problems on his computer. If the tune-up software being tested found problems (and they all found hundreds, but that's another story) it said more about the software than the computer.


    This is Langa's ongoing care and feeding routine for his Windows machine:


    1. Constantly running antivirus software
    2. Constantly running Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (to catch what the antivirus software misses)
    3. From "time to time" he runs still more antivirus software (ESET's Online Scanner, Microsoft's Safety Scanner and Trend Micro's House Call)
    4. Windows Update keeps the OS patched
    5. Secunia PSI keeps the "most important software up to date and free of known security issues" (he didn't say how he updates the un-important software).
    6. To remove bogus Registry entries, junk files and cookies he uses Piriform's CCleaner and/or Macecraft's free PowerTools' Lite every day.
    7. For "a deeper, more controlled cleaning" he uses Macecraft's jv16 PowerTools
    8. Spinning-platter hard drives are defragged nightly
    9. The system "backs itself up automatically every morning"


    And, as Langa says "There's more, but the above steps and apps typically provide everything I need to reliably keep my PC clean, well optimized, stable, and secure".


    From my Defensive Computing perspective, it's an impressive list. But, compare it to what's needed to keep the Chromebook in tip top shape:


    1. Reboot it once a month (give or take) if an indicator appears in the bottom right corner of the screen to indicate that there is a pending OS update


    But even that's optional, because the system will run just fine without installing the pending upgrade. Chrome OS works just like Google's Chrome browser in that respect.


    And Chromebook users probably reboot regularly (as opposed to using sleep mode) because it's fast and extends the battery life. My Chromebook shuts down faster than Windows 7 goes to sleep, and, it cold boots faster than Windows wakes up from sleeping. "
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2012
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  2. Spidershowl11

    Spidershowl11 New Member

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    I didn't find anything wrong with the article. What he said was true. If you use these kinds of free scanning suites, you would know what he is talking about. Whenever you try to download software from the websites you would come across options to scan your computer for free. If you use that you would definitely get these kinds of reports discussed in the article.
     
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Chrome OS gets updated with smaller apps list and option to save directly to Google Drive | The Verge (click for full article)

    "Chromebook and Chromebox users (and anyone else using Chrome OS) have an update waiting for them that offers several usability improvements.


    Before you go check for the update, however, take note of what's changed: most notably, the updated OS features a smaller apps list that pops up from the taskbar. Whereas the old apps list introduced in the Aura update reminded us of OS X's Launchpad, today's update turns the apps list into a Stacks-like window. At the top of that new window is an omnibar search field, so you can search without popping open the browser. Searches inputted into the field will not only open webpages and perform Google searches, but they'll also search for apps on your machine. Unfortunately, it sounds like it will not be able to find files on your Chromebook.


    Other than the UI change, the new version of Chrome OS now allows you to save files directly to Google Drive - the search company first introduced integration with the cloud storage service back in July, but now you can skip the middle man and save straight to the cloud. You'll also be able to use custom desktop backgrounds now, and some of the more minor changes include a revamped Cloud Print dialog, audio support for USB and HDMI, and bugfixes."
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2012

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