Quantcast

Vizio's Google TV box up for pre-order in July with OnLive gaming

Discussion in 'Google TV General Discussion' started by mrspock, Jun 26, 2012.

  1. mrspock

    mrspock Active Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    454
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Just saw the following today....

    SOURCE: Vizio's Google TV box emerges as the Co-Star Stream Player, goes up for pre-order in July with OnLive gaming -- Engadget
     
    • Like Like x 4
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Messages:
    14,605
    Likes Received:
    877
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Interesting. I haven't read anything about OnLive gaming being baked into the new Sony GTV box. IMO the new Sony GTV will have trouble competing with a GTV box that costs half the price of their own box. Unless the Sony box really has an exclusive knock-out feature or vastly superior hardware to justify the higher price.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2012
  3. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    3,846
    Likes Received:
    462
    Trophy Points:
    83
    We don't know much yet but if the boxes use the same processor and have identical features, yes $100 more for the Sony name won't fly. I suspect some key differences will be apparent soon however and I don't think Vizio will get OnLive gaming any quicker than Sony. Either both will launch with it or it will come with an update at some future date, I would be very surprised if the Vizio launches with that feature and the Sony does not although how Sony would juggle PS3 promotion with Google TV gaming promotion isn't clear in my mind. It may be a stealth Sony feature although I have no reason to believe Google TV gaming will be comparable to PS3 gaming.
     
  4. drhill

    drhill Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2011
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Codec support may be a key difference. Not hardware support, but which codecs are licensed by the hardware manufacturer. Not that it is a $100 difference, but it makes a huge difference if you don't have to re-encode media. Sony's got a full list on their site for their streamer. The only three things I don't see are Dolby TrueHD, DTS, and DTS-MA, hopefully that is just a mistake and they are supported.

    On Sony's page they have a OnLive controller dongle listed as an option accessory. So they are supporting it, but maybe you have to download the app on the market.
     
  5. trallyus

    trallyus Active Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Messages:
    626
    Likes Received:
    91
    Trophy Points:
    28
  6. royfernandez1

    royfernandez1 New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2012
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Chrome and OnLive for only $99? That's a pretty compelling proposition.So Vizio doesn't add bloatware to Windows 7, but skins Google TV. Nevertheless, the pricing is attractive. Google was talking about moving GoogleTV to ARM; not sure if that is what's inside. I think the killer differentiator app for Google TV at present is not Internet TV, but it's integration with cable TV and the TV/Movies App and a little bit of Chrome Browser.
     
  7. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    3,846
    Likes Received:
    462
    Trophy Points:
    83
    It has been reported that the player uses an ARM chip but I can't find confirmation that it is the same chip the new Sony player uses, Marvell Armada 1500, 1.2GHz dual core.
     
  8. royfernandez1

    royfernandez1 New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2012
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's good! There is no benefit to an x86 CPU in a platform like this. In fact it could hurt it and slow development as they have to port Android fixes and new releases to the x86 Arch and may not do so with efficiency in mind as much as rushing its availability to prevent fragmentation among versions which is why 4.0 is a unified update for all devices large and small. An ARM based CPU means that the platform just as the others can be updated and developed from the same Ice Cream Sandwich codebase for a efficient use of resources for Android development at Google and the Dev community. The addition of specialized hardware such as HD video codecs, DSPs and a GPU designed for Mobile Phone power volumes reduce power consumption and do the job more efficiently with an ARM based CPU that Android has been optimized for from the get go.

    We need no x86 in the living room. ARM in your television set and smartphone and Power8 in your game console :)
    What say?
     
  9. drhill

    drhill Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2011
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    18
    You haven't been paying attention to how slow ARM phones get updated. Outside of Nexus devices it seems to take manufactures 6+ months to get updates out. Phones have just started getting ICS within the last month. Intel released an x86 image of ICS a month and a half ago.

    Our current GTV boxes also have "specialized hardware such as HD video codecs, DSPs and a GPU", but the main CPU has more general computing power then any ARM chipset from the same time (2+ years now). The problem is lack of NDK for GTV means that CPU is largely left untapped. Power saving in these devices is good for staying green for sure and lower cost is good for manufacturers.

    I'm not against ARM chip sets in the new models. The new ARM chips have enough power to match everything we have in our old devices and hopefully it brings NDK support. But if I were given the choice with all software support being equal I would pick x86.

    I also wouldn't expect these device to be great video game machines (ignore onLive support). I've had my xbox360 for seven years now and nothing on iOS/Android has matched that console yet.
     
    • Like Like x 2

Share This Page