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Thread: Megaupload.com shut down, founder charged with violating piracy laws

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by sparkyscott21, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. sparkyscott21

    sparkyscott21 Moderator Staff Member

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    [h=2]Megaupload.com shut down, founder charged with violating piracy laws[/h]
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    Federal prosecutors in Virginia have shut down notorious file-sharing site Megaupload.com and charged the service’s founder with violating piracy laws. The Associated Press broke the story on Thursday, reporting that the indictment accuses Megaupload.com’s owner with costing copyright holders including record labels and movie studios more than $500 million in lost revenue. The site allowed users to upload and share content without any measures in place to ensure files being hosted on Megaupload.com’s servers were not protected by copyright. The company claims that it responded to copyright complaints as they were received. According to court documents made available on Thursday, Megaupload.com was at one point the 13th most trafficked website in the world.

    1-19-12​
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  2. sparkyscott21

    sparkyscott21 Moderator Staff Member

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    [h=2]Site News: VideoBB And VideoZer Remove All Content[/h]It looks like VideoBB and VideoZer are the next big video sharing sites to fall by the wayside. Around an hour ago they started deleting all the content hosted on their servers. At the moment I cannot find any information about why this is happening - have they been targetted by the law as well as megavideo or are they just running scared (and who could blame them?). It also appears many other sites such as Fileserve have started blocking their sites to US visitors.


     
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Putlocker is another site that I think will bite the bullet.

    Hopefully YouTube stays up -;)
     
  4. txbubba

    txbubba New Member

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    I can still reach Fileserve . com homepage this morning
     
  5. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I love YouTube but it has to change, the copyright violations seem to be getting greater, not fewer. If a site like Megaupload which I would guess consisted of about 99% use in violation of copyright laws can be shutdown, I would guess YouTube which must be about 99% in compliance but still is constantly in violation can be shutdown as well. I am certainly not a copyright attorney but in general laws don't make provisions for being mostly in compliance. Robbing a bank once in a hundred visits probably results in the same sentence as robbing the bank on the first visit.
     
  6. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    The big difference is that YouTube has already been to court for copyright violations. And, it has been proven that the organizations which brought them to court had also been posting their content on it. The big difference about the two sites is that YouTube has a mechanism in place not only for the automated detection but also a clear access to a user reporting tool as well. MegaUpload does not have either mechanism. Their "reporting" mechanism was usually tucked away in the "contact us" link which was nothing more but an email address.
     
  7. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    If Google has YouTube set up acceptably to deal with infringing content, that is great, I would be at a loss without YouTube.
     
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  8. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    Yep, there's even a video describing their process.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
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  9. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    That was interesting and impressive. One funny thing I have noticed with YouTube recently with all of their developing technology being used is the beta dialog conversion to closed captioning. I was watching Boomerang, a '40s or '50s movie the other day, and decided to give it a try. The result was consistently gibberish but very funny. I will assume the technology to discover copyright protected material works better or it might mistake me for Marilyn Monroe.
     
  10. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    Heh. Speech Recognization is a different type of technology. The technology used in Conent ID system uses a specialized finger printing technology which uses "heatmaps". There's a brief example shown in the following video. This website, "Fun with YouTube's Audio Content ID System" has an interesting viewpoint on technology behind it.

    Hell, if you give me a few cases of beer, I might even make that distinction (or lack there of).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
  11. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    It seems like a good strategy on YouTube's part. This way they get some good premium content on YouTube that is not in the public domain (that content owners subsequently agree to let YouTube keep the content up).

    However technically speaking - doesn't this system kind of reward (encourage) users to try and be bolder about posting copyrighted material? (Because even if it's copyrighted - the owners might subsequently agree to leave it on YouTube). This then benefits both YouTube and the user's channel with more views.

    I ask because I have quite a long post with some good movies & shows from YouTube that are not officially in the public domain. Check out my post number 1300 from the Project Free TV thread:

    http://www.googletvforum.org/forum/google-tv-general-discussion/297-project-free-tv-131.html

    As you can see a lot of the posters have channels from YouTube with this kind of stuff. And the users haven't been banned from YouTube. Some users have a few removed and some claim they can no longer post full movies on that particular YouTube channel - so they switch to a different YouTube username channel to post more.

    This makes it a bit more difficult to tell what is "legit" and what isn't (when I post the links on Project Free TV). So I assume generally that if it's not in the public domain but it's been posted on YouTube (for at least a few months without being taken down) - then I figure the copyright holders have probably agreed to let it stay up.

    Also some of these movies (but not all) are posted by users in several different parts. For example a movie might have ten 10 minute parts (videos) encompassing the full movie. I'm assuming this is done to dodge some YouTube uploading restrictions or copyright restrictions. But I'm not sure. For example the "Odd Couple" movie is posted in ten parts - but it's been up for 2 years so I'm assuming it's legit.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  12. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    Whatever method you use to determine it, it is going to end up being an assumption anyways. There's just no way around knowing whether or not the respective content owner has already submitted their assets for identification. YouTube nor the content providers have not been transparent about what is permissible or is flying under the radar.

    Besides, the Content ID system is not fool proof. There are plenty of articles describing how to get around it. So, just because a video stays up this week, last month, or over a year doesn't mean it won't be removed tomorrow due to the prerogative of the content owner.

    So, in my opinion, you should just keep doing what your doing. If a link becomes stale, then so what?! This is a forum. It has information posted by people all the time. Some of it is relevant today but made irrelevant tomorrow. If people can't appreciate the effort that you've place in the thread then who cares? It is not like people are depending on the accuracy of the thread in life or death situations.
     
  13. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Although I certainly don't understand the technical aspects of any of the recognition software, it is clear the copyright recognition technology is far more mature than the speech recognition technology. I hadn't ever seen it in action before trying it for a few minutes for fun. One particularly absurd conversation rendering to closed captioning from that old movie was punctuated with lol. I am pretty sure that wasn't actually stated in the conversation but it was perfect for Google's CC of the conversation, I was laughing pretty hard and laughed even louder when I saw that. I think it works only slightly better at this point than having a chimpanzee pounding on a typewriter.
     
  14. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    The irony of that statement is that Speech Recognition is much older technology and was founded by Bell Labs in the late 30's. I think the problem with speech recognization technology is the human counterpart. Our speech patterns will change upon our stress levels and differ as we get older and even vary with accents fostered by our local regions. It is difficult to try to write software to account for the myriad of changes that a human being can go through. Its development has improved over the years, but for accurate transcriptions one still needs dedicate some free time to teach the software to understand your speech patterns. Even then, having a cold will through the software off.

    Copyright protection is a little bit simpler. Because they already have a sample that can be patterned matched. So, the computer doesn't need to understand what the people are saying in the video. Rather they just need to match the patterns in any of the samples which are already registered. This technology was created by Audible Magic and was developed within the last decade. Just goes to show, age =/= maturity.
     

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