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Six Strikes Online Piracy Program Set To Deploy This Year

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Six strikes online piracy program set to deploy this year | Geek.com (click for full article)

    Sep. 13, 2012 (12:02 pm) By: Mark Raby

    "The next time you download a pirate copy of the latest Hollywood flick, chances are you won't get arrested, but you might receive a nice warning from your Internet service provider. It's part of a new initiative spearheaded by the US government and ISPs throughout the country.

    Last year, a new entity called the Center for Copyright Information was formed. The CCI teamed up with what is believed to be every major service provider, including Comcast, to develop a new six-stage system. About 75% of all online users are represented by the ISPs involved. It's referred to as the "six strikes" program, but officials stress that it isn't a legislative system."
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2012
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Major ISPs rolling out Copyright Alert System 'in the coming weeks' | The Verge (click for full article)

    By Justin Rubio on October 18, 2012 02:23 pm

    "The Center for Copyright Information has stated that it will be rolling out its infringement warning platform, dubbed the Copyright Alert System (CAS), "in the coming weeks."

    Originally announced last year, the Copyright Alert System will be used to deliver infringement notices from content owners to ISP users that illegally download copyrighted material.

    While the initial notices will be purely informational, internet service providers will take extra action on repeat offenders. The punishment for those who refuse to change their ways will vary based on the individual ISP - ranging from requiring the subscriber to review "educational material" to throttling data speeds - although service cancellations are not built into CAS.

    The internet service providers, however, can make the decision to terminate subscriptions on their own terms. As previously stated, customers requesting an independent review of their network behavior can do so by paying a $35 billing fee.

    COMCAST, AT&T, VERIZON, AND OTHERS ARE PLAYING BALL"
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    The Six Strikes Online Piracy Program has been delayed until early 2013:


    Why 'Six Strikes' Could Be a Nightmare for Anyone with Shared Internet | TIME.com
    (click for full article)


    By Matt Peckham Nov. 30, 2012


    "No, "six strikes" isn't a phrase from some esoteric version of baseball played on Mars - it's a colloquialism for a new anti-piracy warning system designed to track copyright infringers and help internet service providers (ISPs) take progressively punitive measures to discourage or prevent said infringers from engaging in further copyright-violating activities.


    It's essentially an industry workaround, after SOPA and PIPA - bills designed to give the government increased power to battle copyright violators - failed or stalled last year.


    But "six strikes" is notably different from either SOPA or PIPA. For starters, it's not a bill. Instead of empowering the government to blacklist sites deemed illicit, it's an escalating warning system managed by ISPs independently. It employs a third-party tool, MarkMonitor, to identify users engaging in copyright-violating activities, then leaves it up to ISPs to take action. ISPs participating at this point include AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Cablevision and Time Warner Cable.


    Say an IP address associated with your account is identified as a violator. Your ISP would first send you a warning, then send further warnings for each infraction, at some point rolling out actual punitive measures, from throttling your bandwidth up to - in theory, a possibility - termination of your service.


    The system was supposed to go live this week, but was delayed at the last minute by the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), the group working with the Motion Picture Association of America, the Recording Industry Association of America and several of the nation's biggest ISPs to roll "six strikes" out.


    According to CCI executive director Jill Lesser, the delay, due to "unexpected factors," is mostly because of Superstorm Sandy, which "seriously affected" the group's final testing plans. CCI says it now expects what it calls the "Copyright Alert System" to kick off in early 2013, adding:


    Our goal has always been to implement the program in a manner that educates consumers about copyright and peer-to-peer networks, encourages the use of legal alternatives, safeguards customer privacy, and provides an easy-to-use independent review program for consumers to challenge alerts they believe they've received in error.


    We need to be sure that all of our "I"s are dotted and "T"s crossed before any company begins sending alerts, and we know that those who are following our progress will agree.


    Regardless of when it goes live, I'm worried about some of those I's and T's - specifically what it's going to mean for me, speaking not as a copyright violator, but as someone whose somewhat unique residential situation poses some awkward, potentially nightmarish alert management issues."
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Throttling and popups: Verizon 'six strikes' anti-piracy policy leaks | News | Geek.com (click for full article)

    Jan. 11, 2013 (4:28 pm) By: Mark Raby

    "An ambitious program that encourages all major internet service providers (ISPs) to enact punitive measures against online pirates is almost ready for prime time. At least one such ISP, Verizon, has a fully prepared system to start warning users if they have been caught engaging in illegal piracy.

    In a recently revealed document Verizon disclosed the ways in which it will alert - and then punish - users who are suspected of file-sharing, content pirating, etc."
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2013
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    AT&T Wil lNot Slow Consumer Internet Over Six Strikes Rules (click for full article)

    by Alex Wilhelm
    26 February 2013


    "Yesterday TNW reported on the start of the 'six strikes' Copyright Alert System (CAS), by which ISPs will ferry copyright complaints from content owners to their customers, playing a middle role of both currier, and applicator of the stick.


    As part of our coverage, we noted that at least Verizon had plans to initiate, after repeated warnings, a temporary slowing of Internet connections of its customers who failed to halt copyright infringing activities. It's important to note that part of the CAS, your Internet connection cannot be completely severed.


    Here is what Verizon will offer you late in the warning process, as punishment for being naughty:


    Agree to an immediate temporary (2 or 3 day) reduction in the speed of your Internet access service to 256kbps (a little faster than typical dial-up speed);


    Agree to the same temporary (2 or 3 day) speed reduction but delay it for a period of 14 days;


    AT&T, however, is taking a different route, and will not slow customer Internet connections. Instead, through its later 'strikes' the company will require users "to take an extra step to review materials on an online portal that will educate them on the distribution of copyrighted content online," according to a statement provided to TNW by AT&T.


    Presumably this will continue to occur for each successive complaint. It is not clear what happens after a sixth strike is used up, given that there appears to be no higher punishment tier.


    The above quoted statement also says the following: "Our commitment remains with our customers and that is why the approach we developed is focused on customer education rather than punishment," and goes on to call customer privacy "paramount."


    While it is simple to fret about the CAS, it must be admitted that what AT&T, to continue this example, has in mind is mild almost to the extreme. It will be an annoyance, and little more, for the dedicated infringer too lazy to discern how to work a VPN. The system appears to be built to address the average infringer, and not a computer guru.


    Finally, AT&T wishes for the CAS to "result in more diverse lawfully available content being made available online" to which we nod our head.


    How the CAS plays out in practice may be quite different from its mild-mannered beginnings, something that we will keep an eye on. For now, it's probably time to download Spotify."
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  6. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Copyright pirates could lose their Internet access via AT&T | VentureBeat (click for full article)

    September 15, 2013 12:13 PM
    by Dylan Tweney



    -- If you're an AT&T Internet customer and the company believes you have been violating copyright law, the company could cut off your Internet access.


    That's the fine print buried in a letter sent by AT&T to suspected copyright infringers, which TorrentFreak obtained and published recently. The key paragraph reads as follows:


    * Through the Copyright Alert Program, users are given an opportunity to understand and change behavior that may be resulting in Copyright Alerts. However, if they receive multiple Copyright Alerts, they may encounter corrective action - or mitigation measures - which may limit or inhibit Internet access. *


    According to the "six strikes" scheme adopted by many U.S. Internet service providers, suspected infringers will get up to six notifications before the ISPs take corrective action. Until recently, however, the scheme was rather vague about what that corrective action might entail.


    Comcast revealed in February that it would start placing an annoying popup notification in users' browsers if they failed to comply with its copyright infringement warnings.




    Read more at Copyright pirates could lose their Internet access via AT&T | VentureBeat
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2013
  7. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    If they wanted to be consistent, they'd pass the notices on to the VPN providers, and if the VPN provider doesn't act on them ... throttle the entire service; but I have no clue if the law would let them go that far.

    Anyway, there's a lot that could be done on the non-punitive side to improve the situation. For instance, I pay a lot of money for TV and movie subscriptions. It pisses me off when I go to my DVR to watch a show, and for some dumb reason, the show didn't record, the schedule changed, or the recording got corrupted. I don't feel like given what I pay a month, that I should have to pay $2 per episode to watch content I was legally entitled to record and view whenever I wanted.

    Things will get interesting if the industry ever adopts a sane pay per view policy. I don't see any reason a TV program or movie offered in your typical Cable package should sell for more than .50/hour.
     
  8. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    A better DVR is the solution to missed recordings or recordings that are corrupted. After 13 years of using TiVo, I can't recall a single missed recording I could blame on TiVo. Schedule changes, power outages, weather warnings, and that type of thing do cause me to miss a recording once in a while, and my manual input is needed to avoid that issue generally, but I don't record anything if missed I consider critical so I just let those happen as they may. The last couple missed recordings from schedule changes were found on Hulu or other online site. The DirecTV DVR I used after DirecTV quit offering TiVo for HD was nearly as reliable, but I dropped DirecTV anyway and live with TiVo and OTA.
     
  9. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    I had the HD Tivo that DirecTv offered, and yeah, it was pretty good at dealing with schedule changes and the like ... but the downfall for that was snow-fade/rain-fade. I think there are (or at least were) some things even TiVo didn't handle well such as programming delays and interruptions. Anyway, there's always something that can go wrong.

    On demand, Hulu, and network web sites sometimes fill in those holes, but not always.
     
  10. pmcd

    pmcd Active Member

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    Most already turned down the $1 per episode that Apple offered them. I wouldn't hold out much hope for your very reasonable suggestion. They have the content and they will charge as much as they can get away with. Apple, Google, Microsoft, Sony etc, ... should think about opening up their own studios for streaming or bypass the cable people and go directly to the video producers. They probably will have to compete with cable to get a reasonable streaming solution. It all seems hopeless.

    Philip


    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk 4
     
  11. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Programming delays usually happen after live events so the season passes following live events need to be adjusted, adding an hour. I forgot about rain and snow outages which were very rare for me but did happen some with DirecTV and also happen with digital OTA.
     
  12. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    The $1 price makes sense to me, I can't see 50 cents working. I have never paid $2 to rent a TV show episode and I think that is the lowest price I have seen from the services I use, some HD shows are $3 so I have never purchased one.

    Vudu still offers a daily 99 cent movie rental and I find three or four of those a month I want to rent but I can't think of another service still doing that and I wonder how long Vudu will continue.
     
  13. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    You can't predict a news story breaking right in the middle of prime time. Anyway, I love DVR's, but I'd gladly do without it if there was an acceptable on-demand service. I'd also gladly dump my programming package if there was a reasonably priced on-demand service that didn't cost more over a month.

    It seems like the industry is stuck in mud, but if someone can breakthrough that mud, it's going to be amazing how quickly things change.
     

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