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Ripping DVD's for playback on Media Player

Discussion in 'Logitech Revue' started by bcresswell, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. bcresswell

    bcresswell New Member

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    Hello everyone!

    I am getting ready to start ripping all alot of my DVD collection to store on a mybook world and would like to know if anyone could lend some suggestions on the best way to go about it. I plan to use DVDshrink along with Handbrake to convert them to .mkv files as that seems to be the best way.

    I have successfully converted one movie so far, but Handbrake took about 10 hours to perform the conversion to .mkv. The video play back is awesome on the Revue, but I am wondering if there is a way to have good quality, but not take so long for the conversion. At that rate, my kids will be off to college before I can ever get all of their movies ready for streaming! I

    'm trying it on another Windows 7 machine now to see if it speeds up the process, but wanted to see if there are things that i could do to speed up the process. I'm really new to all of this and my head is spinning reading about .mkv, ,avi, and ,mp4 along with all the other lingo that goes with this.

    Thanks in advance for any guidance you can provide. A link to an example that you guys are using would be great!
     
  2. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    The MKV, AVI, and MP4 are container formats. They dictate how the various multimedia streams are stored inside the file. It has nothing to do with the playback quality of your movies. That is defined by the codec specifications when encoding your streams.

    There are separate codecs for audio and video. Most people will use video codecs that are based on a MPEG4 variation; MPEG-4 Part 2 (Divx/Xvid) or MPEG-4 Part 10 (H.264/AVC). While DVDs typically has their video streams encoded with the MPEG2 codec. There are a wide variety of Audio codecs; though AAC, MP3, and PCM are common found in traditional converters. Whereas, DVDs & Blu-Rays will often have multiple DTS or AC3 audio streams which vary upon language.

    The task of conversion is probably the most CPU intensive process for personal computers these days next to video games. The time it takes will depend on options for conversion, whether or not the codecs supported by your converter uses any type of hardware acceleration, and the performance specifications of your computer.

    Due to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), I cannot recommend software to rip the copy-protection from the various disc formats. However, I've read that people use DVD Decryptor or AnyDvD for this task. As for format conversion, I used to use Format Factory mainly because it was free but I now use AVS Convertor because it gives me an intuitive visual option to "rescale" the video. This is important in circumstances where widescreen movies are contained with a 4:3 video frame. It is a "feature" found in older titles and the included aspect correction allows me to avoid having to deal with pillar boxing compounded on letterbox formats.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2011
  3. surprisinguy

    surprisinguy New Member

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    lol, buy a cheap dvd player from Target and hook it to your tv
     
  4. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    I think he wants a quick and convenient way of accessing his DVD collection through the network. So, I am not sure that suggestion will help much.
     
  5. bcresswell

    bcresswell New Member

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    Yeah I actually have a PS3 hooked up to the main tv, but if I can get all the movies to strean off of my NAS I can get a revue for each tv and do away with the need for a dvd player on each tv.

    Thanks eferz for the detailed info and I will be giving format factory a shot tonight once I get the little ones to bed:)
     
  6. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    You're welcome. Glad to help.
     
  7. DCLocal

    DCLocal New Member

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    Does AVS Converter allow ripping from Blu-rays or just DVDs? It's not clear on their website.
     
  8. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    AVS Convertor does not perform any ripping capability at all. It only facilitates conversions. For DVD's you typically point it to the TS_Folder/VIDEO_TS.IFO (otherwise *.IFO or *.VOB files) and for Blu-Rays BDMV/index.bdmv (or STREAM/*.m2ts). It has free trial period, so you can download and play with it.
     
  9. usnret

    usnret New Member

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    DVDFab works for me.
     
  10. lkruper

    lkruper Member

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    I went through the process of ripping my DVD movies about a year ago and put them on WD TV Live Plus Hub. I selected the VIDEO_TS format and then used My Movies to download the artwork. When I use the Twonky Server to view these on Google TV Media Player I no longer get the artwork but it appears they play fine, although I have not spent much time with them. What is the advantage of converting them for google tv?
     
  11. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    The most obvious reason is to enable the ability to play them on Google TV. However, my reasoning for conversion isn't just for Google TV. I have several devices in my home that have their own format compatibility and limitation. The least common denominator of accepted formats was selected, so that I don't have to worry about incompatibility issues while playing the respective media on any of my devices. That is why I selected the MP4 container, H.264/AVC video stream, and AAC audio stream. It seems to be the most universally accepted format among my purchases. The added benefit to the MP4 container is that I'm able to embed the cover art and other movie information as metadata with the Meta-X program. Also, the H.264 video stream has hardware acceleration in most of my devices. So, I don't have to worry about the decoding process taking up too much CPU time.
     
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  12. Cygnus

    Cygnus New Member

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    I use Fair Use to rip DVDs into mp4 (h.264) format. I use the ipod touch setting. I normally rip my concert DVDs at 1186kbps with audio being 128k which results in a 600mb file per hour of video. It takes about 3 hours to do it (the higher the bit rate the better the video and larger the file). One thing I like about FU is that it does everything pretty seamlessly. Note that the dual phase encoding is buggy and takes too long so I don't bother with it. It supports other vid formats but I stick with mp4 since it is supported by most media players, devices and OSes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011

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