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Recommended file format for Blu-ray rips on Sony set top box?

Discussion in 'Sony Blu-Ray Set Top Box' started by frazwr01, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. frazwr01

    frazwr01 New Member

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    Hi All -- I'm new to Google TV and I'd like to rip my blu-ray collection and then transfer the files to a Fat 32-formatted external drive, which I'll plug into a usb port on the back of my google tv. From reading some other forum posts, I see that my box should play the blu-ray file format, since it contains "value addition software" that would support playback. I'd be using Anydvd HD to rip (and remove the DRM from) my blu-rays and was hoping to not need to convert the ripped discs after this to another video format (if I do need to convert, I suppose I'd use Handbrake -- unless someone can recommend a better option).

    I'm at my computer at work right now, so not at home to check, but I recall that when I've ripped entire blu-rays in the past, the result is a bunch of folders containing various files (obviously). The video files themselves are located in the "Stream" folder and have an .mts or .m2ts file extension. Obviously the biggest file is usually the main movie file. So would it make sense to just copy this file to my external drive instead of the entire rip? I realize that I would lose the bluray menus and "extras" if I did that, but maybe those won't work on the sony box anyway. I'd rather not spend the time converting formats (to .mp4 for instance) and would also like to preserve the quality of the original encode.

    One last potential issue is the audio format. I'm assuming that the .mts file will contain all the audio streams (Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD and then also some sort of lower quality digital 5.1/7.1 format). Is this correct? If so, does anyone know if the box will default to the HD audio stream? I suppose I could confirm this by checking what my receiver says (the HDMI out from the google box passes through my receiver), but thought I'd ask just in case.

    I'm basically hoping that someone can point me in the right direction on this, or at least reference a post that I may have missed in this or another forum.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    I personally recommend using AVS Converter and going to a MP4 file container, H.264/AVC video stream, and AAC Audio Stream.

    These are the settings I use with AVS Converter.

    • To MP4.
    • H.264/AVC (Advance Video Coding)
    • Encoding type: Multipass - First pass
    • MP4 iso v.2
    After it is complete, I check out the video. If I find any any visual noise then I'll run it again with "Encoding type: Multipass - Nth pass". It is usually not necessary for the second pass though. This is a great format because you'll also be able to embed cover art and movie information with Meta-X.

    Actually, this is not always true. Some of the modern day protection methods places parts of the stream into multiple .m2ts files and jumble them out of sequential order. Your conversion program should be able to interpret the BDMV/index.bdmv file which contains the appropriate file order.

    You can also use muxing tools to join, extract, and manage the encapsulated streams without conversion. That way you do not have to convert the entire file but only the parts that are not compatible. However, that takes quite a bit of manual effort and is often just easier to use a multimedia conversion tool.

    It actually depends on the content authoring company. Any container that contains multiple streams must be marked with a default stream. However, there's no standard dictating which stream must be marked.
     
  3. frazwr01

    frazwr01 New Member

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    Eferz, thanks so much for the quick and detailed response! I'll give AVS converter a try this weekend.

    Sounds like using muxing tools may be too much effort for me and beyond my skill level, but do you know if it would be possible to simply rip an entire blu-ray and save it as an image file that can be opened by google tv? I know that I'm reaching on this one, but it would be great if I could just rip my dvd & blu-ray collection to a bunch of image files (.img, .iso, etc), and use a native (or market) app to open the image file and playback the media just as if the physical disk is in the drive. I'm assuming that's not possible at this point though...

    As this is probably not possible, I'll likely just bite the bullet and resort to ripping and then converting with AVS or Handbrake. Thanks again for all the advice!
     
  4. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    Not at the moment, though you may hit up the developer of either GTVbox Video Player or aVia Media Player to file a request for enhancement to see if it is something they would/could be willing to support in the future. It is kind of a large request though, since the IMG and ISO formats are disc archive formats that contain many different file system, files, and directories that it might be outside the scope of most media players.

    You're welcome. Glad to help. Also, I believe that there are some people that uses DVDFab. I haven't used it myself but just wanted to put it out there in case your looking for different tools to play with or test.
     

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