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PrimeTime App not available outside the USA, booo hoooo!

Discussion in 'Google TV Apps' started by chopper, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    This thread is for all those who live outside the USA and are not happy that PrimeTime is USA only! Post your thoughts here and hopefully someone at Google will at least come up with an ETA for users in other countries?
     
  2. guest

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    The ETA is now - with a VPN service provider!
     
  3. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    What is that?
     
  4. guest

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    Last edited: Dec 17, 2012
  5. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    Ok, I guess I am not sure how this is going to bring the PrimeTime App to Canada? Any thoughts on how VPN will help as I can allready get the App working here but not a Canadian Listing as only Zip Codes work with the App and here in Canada we use Postal Codes?
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2012
  6. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    To be absolutely clear, these new GTV boxes will not sell outside the USA if the PrimeTime App remains USA only. Google is dropping the ball on this, big time. So if you live in the USA and want GTV to be successful going forward, then this is your issue as well.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  7. guest

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    I think you're trying to access TV programming shown in Canada. Wouldn't Canadian cable TV providers need to be participants with Google in providing this information. If the cable providers haven't signed onto this, I don't see how Google TV could link to it. Is the Google TV being sold in Canadian stores? [It's been a long time since I've been in Canada. Montreal, primarily, but I once took a bus trip across the country to Vancouver. (A two-lane highway the whole way!) I'm originally from Boston.]

    I know you've been trying to resolve this issue for over a year. Eferz had a contribution in an earlier thread related to this. A VPN may only give you access to U.S. programming. Though, a few have written in this forum as to how they are watching the BBC iPlayer programming from Britain while living in some other country. With the free Tunlr, you change your DNS to spoof geo-location, as well. I can't think of anything else at this time. And don't claim to have anywhere near the expertise of eferz! I'm still in kindergarden compared to him.
     
  8. guest

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    Chopper, have you posted your concerns here? https://plus.google.com/communities/103154508693468858359
    Or here? https://twitter.com/googletv

    I did a little further research and see what you're talking about. Feature availability - Google TV Help Primetime is only available in the United States right now.

    Or you can try participating in a GoogleTV Hangout. https://plus.google.com/+GoogleTV/posts/dcWb1VhpL6a This is the most recent Hangout I could locate. I don't know how regularly they occur.
     
  9. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    Thanks for your input and I know you are trying to help. Yes, the Sony box is available in Canada and at first they even looked as thought they would support PrimeTime which is GTV's guide for TV listings. I do not think the Canadian cable cos. are the problem but who knows for sure. It would be nice if Google was able to put a timeline on this or just come out and say it's not going to happen. This lac of support for this App outside the USA is killing GTV in other countries. If the cable companies are the problem I would be willing to pester mine and I'm sure other GTV users would as well. As far as I can tell so far the server they use to bring up the programming info in the USA will also bring up my Canadian cable co. listings on the web. All they need to do is enable a 6 digit combination letter and number entry in the Settings App and it should work for me. As it now a stands GTV Settings doesn't accept an entry for a Canadian Postal Code. I am not interested in VPN or the like as I enjoy the high quality HD paid programming that my cable co. provides.
     
  10. guest

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    Contact Sony in Quebec - 1-877-899-SONY Sony eSupport - Electronics - Contact Support
    Even if you don't own a Sony, call them. It was only introduced into Canada (the Sony GTV) very recently, like six months ago. No? Ask them when they plan on enabling Primetime in Canada.

    Are any of the cable service providers in Canada subsidiaries of American cable companies? If so, contact the main office of the cable company in the United States. I think your best bet is the Google TV Hangout. There, you have high-level executives in the Google TV division of Google addressing user concerns directly.
     
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  11. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    Done, we will see what Sony says? I already touched bases with a GTV exec. a while back on Googles facebook equivalent to no avail. I recall hearing them say in a hang out that they are aware of the issue but no fix or timeline for a fix has been offered.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  12. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    This is not acceptable!!!
     
  13. guest

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    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.tv.alf&hl=en
    The developer is Google.


    Here is a list of Rogers' digital cable channels in the Toronto area. Rogers.com -
    Are you located in that metropolitan area? I'm assuming you're a Rogers subscriber.


    How many of those channels are you interested in?


    One option would be to use U.S. zipcodes of communities that border the metro Toronto area. Like Erie, PA. (16511) or Watertown, N.Y. (13601) or Detroit MI (48201). Rogers DOES broadcast cable content from those markets, as well as others.


    Try using U.S. zip codes from contiguous areas of metro Toronto to see if you can get a program guide that is an approximate match-up to what non-GTV cable users normally get with a Canadian postal code in Toronto.
     
  14. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    No dice it has to be fixed by Google!
     
  15. guest

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  16. guest

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    Here's a post from the link above, which sums up your problem.

    Christopher BestNov 8, 2012+1+Karl Tuazon You know, it's not really up to Google when they get to go into these countries, it's up to the music and movie industries in those countries...
    ----
    You need to take up the issue with the CRTC, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission.
     
  17. guest

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    As I understand it, PrimeTime in Canada will allow you to bring up all content, say a movie available on the internet versus the same one being shown at 2:00 P.M. through your cable provider. Because of that, warning bells are sounding in the telecom executive suites in Canada. Read this. After doing so, maybe Google will be less blameworthy:
    ---


    TV versus the Internet
    Telecoms undermining the open Net to favour their own digital TV services? Here's evidence it's happening.
    By: By Steve Anderson, 6 October 2010, TheTyee.ca
    View full article and comments: The Tyee – TV versus the Internet


    Which side are you on?


    It makes sense that many people believe that cable and Internet are two separate services, brought to us through distinct wires. And why wouldn't we think this? After all, these services are also in competition for our business.


    The reality is that television services actually go through the same wires as Internet services. Why is this important?


    Because it raises serious questions about both the practice of slowing access to (throttling) Internet services and the new imposition of broadband download caps by Internet Service Providers (ISPs).


    Are telecom companies discriminating against the open Internet in favour of their own digital TV services?


    Telecom companies seem to have enough money to invest in TV services to ensure that they operate unfettered. Yet people rarely question whether Canada's decline in key broadband metrics, such as speed and cost (compared to other OECD nations), might have something to do with the inherent conflict of interest in having the same entities provide access to two competing mediums.


    The following exhibits provide evidence that telecom companies are exercising preferential treatment toward their TV services over the open Internet.


    Exhibit 1: Rogers caps the Internet


    In July, just days after online video service Netflix announced its expansion into Canada, Rogers Communications announced that they would add new usage limits on some of their plans. This move appears to have been a defensive measure, meant to protect the company's own video services from encroachment by Netflix.


    Rogers Communications is Canada's biggest cable television provider and it operates a video streaming service similar to Netflix called On Demand Online. Rogers' Video On Demand and Pay Per View offerings, which reach users via their televisions, will not be affected by the aforementioned caps, even though Rogers customers receive both Internet and television service through the same cables.


    Some have argued that the caps are not discriminatory if they apply to Rogers's online services as well as Netflix. What these commentators fail to realize is that by adding limits to the Internet while keeping TV costs/services constant, Rogers is discriminating against the public Internet and those who use it to deliver competing services.


    The company already forces customers to be cable subscribers before allowing them full access to Rogers Online. Rogers adopted this policy for fear of cannibalizing the market for their controlled TV service with the open Internet. Why would anyone subscribe to cable if they could get that same service online as part of an Internet subscription?


    Exhibit 2: Bell's freak out


    On August 30, 2010, the CRTC ruled that major telecom companies must allow their independent Internet service competitors to obtain access to the same speeds of broadband as those they offer to their own customers. The incumbent telecom companies are reportedly concerned, not just for fear of increased competition, but also because this will enable independent ISPs to provide fast enough service to facilitate open access to video services like Netflix.


    In short, this decision makes it more difficult for big ISPs to freely use download caps or price increases to discriminate against competing online video services. Independent ISPs like TekSavvy, now in a better position to compete in the market, seem happy to focus on fast and open Internet access, rather than on content distribution. Bell is so threatened that it is calling for cabinet to overturn the landmark CRTC decision.


    It's not just Canadian telecom giants that are afraid of competition from online services. Time Warner reportedly axed a deal with a content company called Epix after it found out that the company was also working with. . . you guessed it. . . Netflix. It appears Time Warner wanted to punish Epix for being disloyal.


    Exhibit 3: Telecoms buying content


    On September 10, Bell Canada Enterprises (BCE) Inc., already Canada's largest communications company, announced its plan to acquire 100 per cent of CTV, the nation's leading broadcaster. Earlier this year, Shaw announced its intention to purchase Global TV's assets, previously owned by the now defunct CanWest. Rogers and Quebecor (owner of Videotron) already own significant media content assets. If Shaw and Bell complete these purchases, telecom companies will own the majority of Canada's private broadcasters, with the exception of Telus, the only major ISP that isn't heavily invested in media content.


    Allowing Internet service providers to own major content assets creates an economic incentive for them to invest in a controlled content distribution infrastructure and to discriminate against the open Internet.


    From command to coercion


    It appears that the big telecom companies learned a lesson when they lost the Net Neutrality battle last year: coercion is a better method of changing people's behavior than overt commands. The best way to demolish an institution, organization, or in this instance, a medium, is to duplicate its services with an alternative medium, and provide extra incentives for people to use that alternative.


    At the same time as they cap and slow down the public Internet, telecom companies appear to be investing in providing faster and more reliable access to Internet services like Facebook and online gaming via TV. Just check out the Telus/Microsoft partnership that 'allows' you to "share photos, stream home videos, [and] connect with friends on Facebook or Twitter right on your TV". This begs the question: if these services eclipse the use of the public Internet, how will the next Facebook, Google, or, for that matter, existing independent services and content providers, reach users?


    Will they have to make special deals with Telus or Microsoft?


    If they do, it could mean the end of the engine of innovation and free expression that is the open Internet.


    An Internet controlled by gatekeepers?


    This big telecom dream is precisely why the recent Google/Verizon Net Neutrality proposal was careful to allow for telecom-based "differentiated services" that would access the Internet. Those "differentiated" or "managed" services are really just neutral-sounding words for an Internet controlled by gatekeepers. It appears that in order to get Verizon to sign on to the proposal, Google allowed these services to be defined in such a way that they fall outside the scope of the proposed Net Neutrality rules in the US.


    If the next generation of access points, found in set-top boxes and wireless devices, restricts the open Internet, there will be a comparable restriction in the open collaboration, participation, expression, and empowerment that the open Internet currently enables.


    These are the very things that have helped strip away our differences and that allow us to transcend space, time, and social strata to more easily connect with each other.


    These are the things that we should be willing and ready to grow, defend, and fight for when threatened by phone and cable companies.


    We should not let this happen right underneath our noses.


    Steve Anderson is the national coordinator for OpenMedia.ca. He is a contributing author of Censored 2008 and Battleground: The Media and has written for The Tyee, Toronto Star, Epoch Times, Common Ground, Rabble.ca and Adbusters. Reach him at: steve@democraticmedia.ca, http://facebooksteve.com, http://steveontwitter.com, and http://medialinkscolumn.com.
    Media Links is a syndicated column supported by Common Ground, The Tyee, Rabble.ca, and Vue Weekly, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 Canada License. You must attribute this work to Steve Anderson, Common Ground, Rabble.ca, TheTyee, VUE Weekly (with link).
     
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  18. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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