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Pay TV Goading Media Companies To Withhold On Web

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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  2. Carlszone

    Carlszone Well-Known Member

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    Lol!

    How do ya stop the race after the horses have left the gate? You cannot turn back the tide of a new media age. The networks & cable companies should have anticipated this change to media access years ago. Cox has lost so many subscribers that they raised fees some $40-$50. All I know is I was enjoying cable, internet & phone for $174.00. The next month my monthly subscription charges jumped to $215.00. I tried dropping phone, and two premium packages to no avail. The bundling discount went away & I found myself still over $200.00. The best I could get down to was $185.00 for two years. With taxes it would still be over my $200.00 self-imposed limit. Also I'd be locked in for two years or end up paying a hefty early disconnect fee.

    Bye-bye cable...

    Carl
     
  3. Carlszone

    Carlszone Well-Known Member

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  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    How The Pay-TV Business Keeps People Hooked - Business Insider (click for full article)

    by Jay Yarrow - June 18, 2013

    "The pay-TV business is finally starting to show some cracks in its facade.

    In the last twelve months, pay-TV lost 80,000 subscribers. This is the first loss of its kind, and it can be partially attributed to the rise of the web."


    Also from the article:


    "But, there are those undeniable cracks in the pay-TV business. What happens as they get bigger?

    Cable companies have a back-up plan - broadband Internet.

    Time Warner Cable generated $1.4 billion in high-speed residential data services last quarter. That was up 17% compared to the video revenue, which was down 1.5% on a year-over-year basis.

    If things were to truly collapse for Time Warner Cable, and all of its users dropped video for services like Aereo, or Netflix, then you can bet the price of high-speed Internet will go through the roof."

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Darn - it seems like there is always a fly in the ointment -:( Too bad Google Fiber isn't nationwide.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  5. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Fortunately most markets have competition for high speed internet service so we won't see prices go through the roof. If people expect to drop cable and get just internet service for the discounted bundled price received with cable, they will find that is a rather silly expectation. For those of us only using internet service, we aren't going to see big rate increases.

    I am still not convinced there is going to be huge numbers leaving pay TV behind for an antenna and internet TV. I did it but I think the small numbers that have left now are primarily a result of the economy, entertainment budgets have been slashed and pay TV is a non essential monthly bill. Healthcare costs and energy costs have more to do with it than leaving for internet TV would be my guess.
     
  6. Carlszone

    Carlszone Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    I agree, partially...

    The level of internet provider competition is increasing in my area. They don't offer the high speeds of Verizon & Cox, but as prices increase w/the main providers I expect users will start looking to these alternative companies. The only problem is that they all use the same lines provided by Cox & Verizon. Right now the licensing fees are regulated. But in any all out ISP wars the legislators can easily change the rules of the game. Right now the fees are regulated in the favor of the small boys. But let them start thriving via Cox & Verizion lines and the big boys will put up a fight.

    Any of the other attempts to stifle innovation had better be legal. Picking & choosing which type of internet access is favored w/medial content just will not work.

    Push too hard and consumers will begin to realize where the power to control their entertainment destiny truly lies.

    In the Pocketbooks & wallets of the consumer...

    Carl
     
  7. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Apple/Google/Intel TV Plans Thwarted: Who Wins? (click for full article)

    by Dee Gill - June 20, 2013

    "Companies like Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOG) and Intel (INTC), which want to stream television programming, are getting stonewalled by the cable companies that don't want to share the content, according to a variety of news reports last week. For Netflix (NFLX) shareholders, this is just a wonderful development."
     
  8. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Broadcasters are missing out on a ton of data?it?s time to take TV online ? paidContent (click for full article)

    by Mike Salmi - June 22, 2013

    SUMMARY: Consumers aren't the only ones who would benefit if broadcasters put everything online. This is what they're missing out on by not doing that.


    -- "Steven Spielberg and George Lucas made a big commotion at a talk recently when the two predicted the imminent "implosion" of the film industry due to the changing nature of theatrical distribution. I believe a similar phenomenon awaits the broadcast TV industry, unless companies start making aggressive moves.

    Rather than fighting cord-cutting and unbundling and making a weak effort with TV Everywhere, the top brass should be looking at putting their full broadcast TV channels online - with no restrictions. Certainly they have done a decent job offering their shows on demand via Netflix and Hulu. But outside of a recent ABC trial and certain sports broadcasts, watching live broadcast channels online still requires that you have a paid cable TV subscription in order to view."
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013

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