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Panasonic And Mozilla Join Forces To Develop Firefox OS-Powered Smart TV's

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Jan 6, 2014.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Panasonic and Mozilla join forces to develop Firefox OS-powered Smart TVs | The Verge (click for full article)

    by Kwame Opam - Jan. 6, 2014

    -- Firefox OS, Mozilla's HTML5-based platform designed to go toe-to-toe with iOS and Android, may soon find its way into the living room. Panasonic announced today that it's partnering with the software company to help "develop and promote" Firefox OS on next-gen Smart TVs, with the goal of turning the operating system into a hub for future Smart Homes. The move marks Mozilla's first major foray into the war for TV.


    MOZILLA IS JOINING THE WAR FOR THE LIVING ROOM


    According to the official release, the partnership will allow developers to build apps and cloud services into future televisions based on the same APIs that underpin Mozilla's web and mobile offerings. Crucially, the company plans to make the living room television a means for connecting with the rest of the tech in and out of the home, though it's currently unclear just how the interface will be implemented.


    Even if they remain a risky proposition, Smart TVs appear to be making a resurgence at CES this year - especially with LG's own webOS-powered offering on the way. US consumers may have to wait a bit for these developments to bear fruit, though. Mozilla recently backpedaled on selling Firefox phones in the US late last year, and there are currently no indications that Firefox TVs will reach the West anytime soon.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2014
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Mozilla: In 2014, all your hardware belongs to us | Business Tech - CNET News (click for full article)

    by Seth Rosenblat - Jan. 6, 2014

    -- Soon, you'll be able to get your hands on a Firefox OS tablet -- but only if you promise to develop for the fledgling operating system.Launched last year on three smartphone models in 14 countries on major carriers such as Telefonica and Deutsche Telekom, Mozilla has partnered with hardware maker Foxconn to build tablets for Firefox OS developers in 2014, the company announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas on Monday.


    Read more at: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-57616709-92/mozilla-in-2014-all-your-hardware-belongs-to-us/
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2014
  3. guest

    guest Active Member

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    It all boils down to who will be the "gatekeeper". If Firefox updates need the permission of Panasonic to be pushed to the TV/device, fuhgeddaboudit. We all need to think about that when making purchases in the future. Will you be in control OR be controlled!
     
  4. Carlszone

    Carlszone Well-Known Member

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    Excellent point! Whether it is a Smart TV or a Settop box the update problems are the same. Users are left to the mercy of each manufacturer for support and updates. The current trend seems to be to use company user bases to test devices & TVs. If it ain't a hit they simple bail out and leave users stranded.

    R & D and comprehensive quality assurance seems a thing of the past. While this may not be significant in terms of individual budgets w/devices selling at $100.00-$200.00, I'd be leery about purchasing high-end items like large screen smart TVs. A $2000.00 to $4000.00 TV w/a dead end OS would be a very expensive mistake.

    Do the research...
     
  5. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I know competition is a good thing but I can't see how so many different smart TV operating systems are a good thing for the consumer. About all that guarantees is consumer confusion and unwillingness to get involved until it is clear something will catch on. I see this operating system competing with WebOS for last place, that is if it ever shows up on any smart TV devices.
     
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  6. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I agree more TV Smart operating systems will create more confusion - and it's also bad for app developers - meaning it makes it harder for any one TV OS to have all the apps.

    However the reviews of LG's WebOS have been very positive thus far - and I can't say I blame LG for dropping GTV because they are in business to make money - and the GTV devices don't sell well.

    It's disappointing because if Google would of "hit-the-nail-in-the-head" with GTV they could be dominating the Smart TV market now. I haven't seen the new GTV version 4 - but IMO if the main thing it does is make the "interface better" by rearranging it for the umpteenth time - that won't be enough to cut the mustard.

    They are trying to make the next generation GTV simpler by removing the keyboard altogether from the remote. We'll see if that catches on with consumers - however "Content is King" - and thus far I don't think the GTV Jellybean update adds any new content. The removal of Flash and the addition of the NDK for (theoretcally) more apps - hasn't really resulted in any new apps or content thus far. Perhaps only for tech enthusiasts that are into 'sideloading' - but even the sideloaded apps aren't optimized for GTV and my guess is some 'work' - but with various glitches on many of them. The requirement to sideload most apps won't save GTV.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2014
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  7. Carlszone

    Carlszone Well-Known Member

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    Yes, Catfish!

    This is why I worry about how aggressively we encourage folks to either keep (beyond return date) or buy GTV large screen TVs. I don't complain about the GTV platform for selfish reasons or just to blow off steam. I just want folks to give potential new purchasers of GTV devices & TVs an honest assessment of the future of Google TV. Often I see threads where folks allow their enthusiasm for GTV to color their advice to new users.

    Unfortunately, we are at a place where it is better to advise folk to wait until we have some idea which units will receive the update. As for LG TVs, again we don't know whether JB is worth the investment in an HDTV. Comparing GTV w/other devices and Smart TVs that don't have all the browser, apps, or internet features doesn't give them a fair assessment of GTV if this platform fails to meet their needs.

    Nobody wins...

    Carl
     
  8. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Meet the first Firefox OS tablet prototype - Liliputing (click for full article)

    by Brad Linder - Jan. 17, 2014

    -- Mozilla is beginning to test Firefox OS on tablets. The browser-based operating system is designed to run web apps written using HTML5 and other web technologies and it's already available on a handful of low-end smartphones.


    If the specs for the first Firefox OS tablet prototypes are anything to go by, the first tablet-sized devices running Mozilla's software will also be low-cost, low-end devices.


    Mozilla's Asa Dotler has shared the specs for the first devices in the Firefox OS tablet program. It has a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 pixel IPS display, 2GB of RAM, 16GB of storage and an Allwinner A31 ARM Cortex-A7 quad-core processor with PowerVR SGX 544 graphics.


    The tablet has front and rear cameras, WiFi, Bluetooth, and GPS, a microSD card slot and micro USB port and a 7000mAh battery.


    The tablet's built by Foxconn, and it basically has the specs of a low-end Android tablet.


    That doesn't mean all Firefox OS tablets will be low-cost devices, but it's not a bad place to start. Mozilla's hardware partners have been launching Firefox OS phones initially in developing markets, where smartphone and tablet saturation isn't as high as it is in the US and Europe - and where a newcomer might have a better chance to compete with Android, iOS, and other dominant platforms in developed markets.
     

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