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Ouya Developer Kits Are Shipping, $99 Android Game Console Coming In 2013

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Dec 27, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Ouya developer kits are shipping, $99 Android game console coming in 2013 - Liliputing (click for full article)

    "The makers of the Ouya video game console have started shipping developer kits to folks who paid $699 or more during the team's successful Kickstarter campaign. The company plans to start shipping Ouya units to customers early in 2013, with the video game console selling for about $99 plus shipping.


    SlashGear reports the first units should begin arriving this week.


    The Ouya game console is a small box with an NVIDIA Tegra 3 quad-core processor, 1GB of RAM, 8GB of storage, WiFi, Bluetooth, a USB 2.0 ports, Ethernet, and HDMI ports.


    It runs Google Android software, but it's not a phone or a tablet. Instead the Ouya console is designed to be plugged into your television so you can play games on the big screen. It also includes a wireless game controller, a game store, and more.


    The developer consoles come with two controllers - but their main appeal is that they're shipping a few months ahead of the final units, which should give game developers (or serious enthusiasts) a chance to try out the device before it's available to the general public, and adapt games to run on the platform.


    While there's no shortage of video game consoles for the living room, the developers of the Ouya project want to lower the barriers to entry for independent game developers. Basically, if you can create a game that runs on Android, it can run on Ouya - you don't need to go through the hassle of signing with a game publisher, packaging the title on a disc and distributing it to game stores.


    On the other hand, the Ouya is expected to ship to regular customers in early 2013 with hardware that was state of the art in early 2012. While you can still write some pretty nifty games for the Tegra 3 processor, Samsung and Qualcomm are already offering mobile processors with significantly more graphics power, and NVIDIA is expected to launch a Tegra 4 chip soon.


    Will the Ouya feel dated by the time it finally arrives? Then again... with a $99 price tag, does it really matter?"
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2012
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Watch the Ouya developer console unboxing | Chips | Geek.com (click for full article)

    Dec. 28, 2012 (7:31 am) By: Matthew Humphries


    OUYA Developer Console Unboxing:



    "Yesterday we heard that the Ouya developer consoles had started shipping, and just a day later the folks on the Ouya developer team have been kind enough to do an unboxing video. You can watch it above.

    This is by no means final hardware, but promises to give developers everything they need to start developing apps and games for Ouya. Included in the jet-black box is an official developer welcome letter, frosted translucent developer console, two frosted translucent controllers, the power adapter, HDMI cable, Micro USB cable, and batteries for the controllers. The only surprise in that package is the Micro USB cable because they decided to add a Micro USB port to the hardware making it easy to hook up to a PC.


    These versions of the console are special and form a very limited run. Although they allow developers early access to the hardware, they also come with a few issues that need to be worked out before the final hardware ships. Most notably, the controller has a D-pad and triggers that are less than great. Although still very usable, fine tuning the controls for a game wont be possible as the controller Ouya gamers use will be different.


    The Ouya development team now wants feedback, and they are expecting a lot of bug reports to come in. But that's a good thing, as it's not until the hardware is used in anger that it starts to become a real product you can ship to consumers. As for the software, the dev units are also shipping with a very early version of the user interface, which is aiming to look like the screenshot below:"
     
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