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Discussion in 'More News from Your Google TV News Team' started by Rickaren, Jan 12, 2011.

  1. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Smart TV or Connected TV - It's getting Competitive. And Messy.

    January 12, 2011






    [​IMG]The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Walt Disney, owners of ESPN and ABC is rumoured to be in talks with Yahoo on making some of it's TV inventory available through the Yahoo Widget platform. Yahoo is also tightly working with ABC, CBS, HSN, and Showtime. Hulu, Comcast, Time Warner Cable are working on Samsung TV Apps. And maybe News Corp. (see below)


    Further complicating the picture - Yahoo Apps are available on the Samsung TVs. Unless it's a Samsung that has Google TV - then you would likely not get Hulu, Disney, Comcast, ESPN, Time Warner Cable, ABC, CBS, HSN, and Showtime, most likely. Most of the broadcasters have been blocking Google TV. Google is too big - and a bit scary - they are protecting their inventory from being made easily available via the Google TV web browser. Unless they can make a deal.



    It's getting complicated? Wait... there's more.
    With a Google TV you will get full web browsing on the Internet.
    If you have an older Samsung Smart TV (without Google TV) you can't, right now, browse the Internet as it's all App based. However, PC World reports that the new Smart Hub platform released by Samsung TV will allow web browsing... which won't make ABC, CBS, HSN, Showtime, Hulu, Comcast, Time Warner Cable or Disney very happy as online video will become accessible... like Google TV. Unless Samsung can or will block Internet video from their browser.
    Confused? So am I. And I have been covering this space for some time.


    More from the Wall Street Journal:
    ...Companies including Apple Inc., Google Inc., and Cisco Systems Inc. have entered the race to combine Internet video and conventional TV in a variety of ways, including selling separate devices that attach to cable boxes and building software into cable boxes and new TV sets.
    Why on earth the WSJ is comparing Apple and Cisco into the mix, I am not sure. I guess they are confused too.



    Apple and Cisco are Set Top Boxes (STBs) providing Over The Top (OTT) content. They are not Internet TVs, Smart TVs, Web Enabled TVs, Hybrid TVs or whatever we are calling them this week. Or what LG, Samsung, Sony, Philips, Sharp, Toshiba, Loewe, Panasonic, Vizio and other CE manufacturers are building, Mostly on different dev platforms of course... which is more confusing for developers and brands rather than consumers in this case. So let's call them Connected TVs for now.


    Then we have a single screen interactive platform in the UK called Youview rolling out in 2011. Which is backed by BBC and meant to bring video-on-demand to Freeview and Freesat but has been rejected by Sky Virgin Media, IP Vision, Six TV, United For Local Television and the Open Source Consortium who are protesting the new interactive platform (which also will allegedly have open APIs or an SDK for developers to create Apps). So how will that work with a Smart TV that also Apps included with the platform?



    And on the continent there's the HbbTV consortium - a pan-European initiative aimed at providing an alternative to proprietary technologies and delivering an open platform for broadcasters to deliver value added on-demand services to the end consumer. Which the Germans, French and Dutch seem to get along with. But it's largely a broadcaster's tool than anything... much like Youview.


    Than again, they are working with both television broadcasters and CE companies therefore I am assuming in Germany I can buy a Connected TV that has either HbbTV, Google TV, or just the regular platform from the manufacturer.



    Toss in Ultraviolet - the new video streaming DRM and it gets trickier. Which it wants the CE manufacturers to stick too. But last time I checked, Bittorrent had 100 million users a month and download times are in freefall for full feature movies as broadband gets faster. That's not good. Remember the music industry?
    Oh and UltraViolet videos won't play in iTunes, nor will UltraViolet devices be able to play iTunes encrypted video. Apple and Disney, is backing its own competing system, called Keychest. Of course. Apple does not like making use of or paying for the use of tech they didn't invent. That's the main reason why your Mac will never play blu-ray disks.



    Consumers are going to have some challenges in figuring all this out and buying their TVs in 2011. That's for sure. It's like untangling a decade of cables from behind the TV.


    SOURCE
     
  2. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    TV Networks Upset Over Comcast App


    By Graeme McMillan on January 12, 2011


    [​IMG]







    You'd think that Comcast would've learned from Google's mistakes, but apparently not. The cable company's new Xfinity TV app for the iPad is currently under fire from broadcasters and content providers unhappy with an app that streams their programs live or on-demand without their permission.


    According to Mediaweek, a presentation of the new app at last week's Annual Global Entertainment, Media and Telecommunications Conference has prompted rights holders to calmly remind Comcast that they haven't given permission for their content to appear through the app, with one anonymous source saying "It's very simple. Distribution via any sort of third-party app is not covered in our carriage deals with Comcast. We're not going to sit on our hands if they choose to ignore that fact."
    So far, only HBO, Showtime, Starz and Cinemax have signed on to the new app, with Comcast reporting that Turner Broadcasting will be involved in an unspecified capacity as well. Whether this means that Xfinity will become a boutique app favored for its pay-cable access, or Comcast will see the light and pay CBS et al for their programming, remains to be seen, but with one network head telling the trade paper "We've never been in the business of handing over our rights... You let our proprietary content scatter to the four winds and you're eating into our own digital platforms. That's not going to happen," something tells me that it's not going to be an easy fix.




    SOURCE
     
  3. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    It’s Not Google TV, but RCA’s Android Television Doesn’t Look that Bad [VIDEO, CES 2011]

    by Kevin Krause on January 12th, 2011 at 8:38 am
    [​IMG]
    I will get this out of the way: if you want a TV with Android inside, you want Google TV. You don’t want one of the several models shown off at CES featuring half-baked versions of Android running alongside — but not integrated directly into — the TV viewing experience. Having said that, we checked out a couple and they don’t look awful, just not as thoroughly thought out or well-rounded and polished as Google TV.
    RCA will be dropping a lineup of Android-laden televisions next fall, and so far they are looking pretty decent. You will see in the video below that the TV will do just about everything you’d expect an Android device to do (aside from make phone calls and send SMS messages): surf the web, mess around with apps (though we doubt the Market will make an appearance), check your email, etc.. See a quick overview below:







    SOURCE


    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Cloud Computing: Cisco Demonstrates Videoscape Entry in Cluttered Web TV Arena





    By Clint Boulton on 2011-01-12
    Cisco Systems has long been angling to expand from its enterprise networking and infrastructure roots to make a play for more consumer-friendly services. Case in point: The company, which more than a decade ago cut its teeth making market-leading routers and switches, now owns the popular Flip video camera. Cisco CEO John Chambers popped into the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show to unveil the company's play to bring Web content to TV, tablet and smartphone screens in the form of Videoscape, a batch of software and two media appliances. During a demonstration, Chambers showed the media crowd how to make a video call with Videoscape, surf the Web and broadcast TV channel content, and browse social feeds and DVR recordings. If this sounds like a twist on the Web-meets-TV model Google is espousing with Google TV, it surely is.

    However, while Google TV is sold directly to consumers, Cisco will only sell Videoscape appliances and software to service providers, such as Telstra, which will offer it to consumers.
    Pricing and availability for Videoscape is not yet available. In fact, it's so early in the game that Cisco has not announced any U.S.-based service providers, such as Verizon FIOS or AT&T U-verse, for the new service. Check out these Videoscape images and demo photos in this eWEEK slideshow.


    SOURCE W/Slideshow
     
  5. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Will Microsoft Windows be running your TV?

    CES 2011: Exclusive interview with Microsoft's Mark Pendergrast


    [​IMG] View more images 12 January 2011


    When Microsoft invited us along to a sneak preview of its latest innovation at the CES tech show in Las Vegas, we were intrigued by the possibility of a Windows TV. That wasn't what we got but we weren't far off. Microsoft was, in fact, showcasing a range of new products based on its Windows Embedded software, including an internet-enabled TV.

    As Microsoft's senior product manager for Windows Embedded Marketing, Mark Pendergrast, puts it:
    "We see this as a competitive offering to Google TV - Windows Embedded is an alternative platform for manufacturers to create their own smart TV".

    The TV prototype that we were shown by Microsoft was manufactured by Chinese brand Haier, best known in the UK for its white goods such as washing machines and fridges. A slot in the side of the TV panel houses full PC functionality that powers the Windows Media Center experience. Along with Internet browsing, the device has all the features that you would expect from a smart TV, including plenty of third-party apps and games that have been modified to suit the screen size and UI.

    But what exactly is so good about the software that the smart TV functions are running on? Pendergrast gave us some background:


    "Windows Embedded is one of the few groups within Microsoft that isn't primarily concerned with PCs, but is actually focused on pretty much everything else. At Microsoft, we take parts of Windows and we use them as a platform for manufacturers to build devices as wide ranging as medical equipment to point of sale and digital signage. A new focus for us is consumer electronics such as TVs, set-top boxes and DVD players.


    Microsoft is working with OEMs on this new, consumer electronics-tinged venture and if you're wondering what on Earth OEM means, its stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer - in other words, a company that makes products or components that are bought by another company and sold under the latter's brand name. Confusingly, it can also refer to the company that has purchased the components to use in its products - which is the case here.

    "All the new devices on display at CES are being powered by Windows Embedded Standard 7. It's an operating System that OEMs can change - they can take parts of Windows that are needed for their particular device".


    The idea is that by just using a small part of Windows and customising it to suit each device, you'll get the benefit of faster performance as well as the products being cheaper to build and cheaper to manage in the long-run. As the software can be tailored to suit each manufacturer's needs, it means that brands can make their products stand out from their rivals.
    [​IMG]


    Along with the Haier TV, Microsoft also showcased a number of other connected media devices including the Prime Time set-top box that combines internet capability with broadcast TV, thanks to a built-in IP tuner. Also on display was the Reycom 100, the brand's next-generation hybrid set-top box that lets you watch live TV and store videos, music and pictures on the devices' integrated hard disk. You can also transfer your content to your PC, home server and Windows Phone 7 handset. Both the Raycon and Prime Time products use customised versions of the familiar Windows Media Center UI.

    Microsoft also introduced us to the Gateway prototype media console which enables you to record six different cable streams at the same time. All the tuners are network-shareable so that any other Windows 7 PC that's in the home can record at the same time.
    [​IMG]

    With so many companies launching their own internet-enabled home cinema products at CES 2011, as well as over the last couple of years, the biggest surprise is that Microsoft hasn't already come forward with a Windows-branded smart TV platform, especially as Google TV has been knocking around for a while now.
    "That's not the point of our business. Our business is about helping the OEM to build their brand", says Pendergrast. Fair enough but we can't help wondering why Microsoft wouldn't want the public recognition from the end user for helping to power their TV set.

    So then, what will set Windows-based TVs apart from their competitors? According to Prendergast, it's all about compatibility.
    "A Windows Embedded-capable device has the advantage over its competitors as it's possible to connect to lots of other Windows products. For example, Windows Phone 7 devices now play an important role within the home as many of them include built-in DLNA capability, so you can take photos and videos with your phone and then share them on a TV, via a connected media device.

    "The other key advantage is that we have support for broadcast TV on the Gateway device, which is something that other brands aren't yet offering".

    So, will we be seeing any other Windows-based TVs on the market any time soon? As usual, "wait and see" is the answer.
    "The Haier set is the only TV with Windows Embedded that we're showing at the moment, but we are talking to a number of new manufacturers as well".

    Although the Haier panel that we saw at CES was only an early concept model, it gave us a good indicator of what we can expect to see in the future. Although there won't be an actual Microsoft-branded "Windows TV" launching any time soon, there should be plenty of panels on the way that use Windows as a base for their own, customized versions of smart TV. But whether you'll know about it when you're watching one is another thing.


    Read more: Will Microsoft Windows be running your TV? - Pocket-lint Will Microsoft Windows be running your TV? - Pocket-lint
     
  6. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Interactive TV News Round-Up (IX): Samsung, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Google TV, Adobe, DirecTV, Shalom TV, Sling Media


    January 11, 2011


    --Comcast, Time Warner Cable to Offer Service on Samsung Connected TV's, Tablets

    --Samsung Unveils Google TV Devices, Supports Adobe Air 2.5, Teams with DirecTV on RVU TV's

    --Free VOD Service, Shalom TV, Now Available in 40 Million Homes

    --Sling Media Launches Subscription Service for Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Customers, Google TV Client

    --Free VOD Service, Shalom TV, Now Available in 40 Million Homes
    --Sling Media Launches Subscription Service for Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Customers, Google TV Client






    Due to the large volume of news generated by the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), which took place last week in Las Vegas, we are covering stories in this issue in summary/round-up form. Our regular news coverage will return shortly.

    • During Samsung's keynote at CES last week, it was announced that the US's two largest cable MSO's, Comcast and Time Warner Cable, plan to offer services on Samsung connected TV's and Galaxy tablet devices. "For the first time on a connected TV, the new [Comcast] Xfinity TV service will offer a rich, Web-like interface, enabling simpler navigation and the ability to seamlessly search across linear TV, DVR recordings, and video-on-demand among tens of thousands of content choices," Comcast states in its press materials. "A sleek graphics-rich display will guide the viewer to their favorite programming. The partnership also will deliver a customized and integrated multiplatform viewing experience on Samsung smart TVs and the Android-powered Samsung Galaxy Tab. On the tablet, the Xfinity TV experience is a virtual television guide and a mobile video player all in one. Xfinity TV digital customers will be able to browse, discover and sort video content, change the channel on a Samsung smart TV in real time, and program DVR's. In addition, they can watch streaming TV programming and movies directly on the tablet, and access that content across multiple devices. The service's roadmap includes the ability to begin watching a favorite movie on the Samsung Galaxy Tab, then pause the movie and resume watching it on a Samsung smart TV from the exact moment it was paused, and vice versa...The Xfinity TV experience will be distributed later this year on the Samsung smart TVs and on the application store for the Galaxy products interacting through the Comcast set-top box, giving consumers yet another access point for discovering and connecting to Comcast Xfinity TV services." Time Warner Cable, meanwhile, describes its new partnership to "allow Time Warner Cable customers to access their cable subscriptions on the Samsung Smart TV and Samsung Galaxy Tab in their homes" as follows: "Available as an app within Samsung's application storefront, the Time Warner Cable service ultimately will give Time Warner Cable's subscribers access to all of their cable channels directly on Samsung smart TV's and Galaxy Tab in the home. All of the content can be consumed through Samsung's award-winning LED, LCD and Plasma smart TV line-up, which delivers a high-quality, visual enhanced and connected entertainment experience to the home." In addition, the MSO says, its customers will be able to "access recorded content from a DVR elsewhere in the home directly on the Samsung Smart TV, without the need for a connected set-top box, [thus creating] a multi-room viewing experience that doesn't require multiple set-top boxes in homes that have more than one connected TV." (Note: In a related development, at CES Verizon was demo'ing a FiOS TV IMG 1.9 TV/DVR app running on various connected-TV devices from Panasonic and Samsung, and it says that it has also ported the app to certain game consoles. The company claims to now be able to run FiOS TV on "over three dozen" devices that are not cable set-top boxes. Technology blogger, Dave Zatz, has more.)
    • In other Samsung news: 1) The company has unveiled a new Blu-ray player and companion box "enabling Google TV as part of its ongoing Smart TV product offerings"; 2) The company has announced that its Smart TV platform "will be the first to integrate support for Adobe AIR 2.5 for TV, making it easy for developers to build, distribute and monetize standalone applications through Samsung's Smart TV applications store, Samsung Apps," and that it will "bring Adobe Flash Player 10.1 to its Smart TV browser, extending the company's current support for Flash Player 10.1 on Samsung smartphones and tablets." 3) The company has formed a partnership with DirecTV "to present the world's first RVU-compatible production televisions, which will provide more than 19.1 million DirecTV subscribers with the ability to watch live broadcast and stored content from their DVR on Samsung Smart TV's, without the need for additional set-top boxes. The RVU protocol will be supported on Samsung's LED D6000, LED D6400 and LED 6420 TV products that reflect the company's commitment to delivering consumers high-quality, visually enhanced and connected entertainment experiences in their home," Samsung's press materials continue. "A RUI technology based on industry standards such as DLNA and UPnP, RVU allows a set-top box server to provide a multi-room, complete viewing experience that includes DVR services, without the need for additional set-top boxes in homes that have more than one connected TV."
    • Jewish-themed free VOD service, Shalom TV, has announced that it has added 10 million homes to its distribution network over the past year, allowing it to pass the 40-million home mark. "The growth of the mainstream Jewish cultural free VOD network came from the 2010 launches on Cox Communications in New Orleans, LA; Time Warner's Texas systems in Corpus Christi, Laredo, El Paso, Rio Grande, Golden Triangle and San Antonio; Service Electric Cable TV in Allentown, PA; WOW! in Cleveland, Chicago, Columbus, OH, and Evansville, IN; and GCI Cable serving Alaska."
    • EchoStar-owned TV place-shifting company, Sling Media, has announced a subscription service that it says will give Verizon Wireless customers "the ability to watch their home TV on new 4G smartphones." Meanwhile, at CES, Sling Media demo'd a Google TV client that enables its place-shifting service to be used on Google TV devices without the company's SlingCatcher hardware. Technology blogger, Dave Zatz, has more.
    SOURCE
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
  7. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Should you get a smart TV?


    Internet-connected TVs with streaming video were all the rage at CES, but are they worthy of your hard-earned cash?

    by Samuel Axon on January 12, 2011

    Filed under: TVs and Video
    [​IMG] The 2011 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas cemented the "smart TV" trend for at least the next year, with countless TVs displaying basic internet features like search, social networking, sports widgets, and streaming video from Netflix and other online content providers. But are companies like Sony and LG trying to create demand where none exists?

    As high-quality screen technologies and 3D displays become more common, TV manufacturers may attempt to differentiate themselves with internet TV features, just like cell phone manufacturers spend less time talking about phone calls now than they do about data plans and features.

    Would-be TV buyers have three options in 2011: buy a smart TV, make their dumb TVs smarter, or steer clear of the so-called revolution. From where we're standing now, any of these appears to be a viable option — it all depends on what you're after.

    Option 1: Buy a smart TV
    Integrating basic web features in TVs first started to get bandied about as a marketable idea at CES 2009, where TVs were shown running the interesting but not quite fully cooked Yahoo! Widgets interface. In 2010, Google showed the world what it believed to be the TV of the future in Google TV, a version of the Android operating system designed for TVs.

    Where Yahoo! Widgets served up a handful of tools with limited functionality, Google TV turned the TV into an almost fully functional computer, like an oversized smartphone. It could search and browse the web, download apps, and act as a communications and social networking hub. At least, that's the long-term vision — not all of those features have yet been fully realized.

    We were expecting Google TV to make a modest showing at CES 2011, and it did, but it's clear that even if Google TV itself isn't ready for prime time, TV manufacturers believe the concept is. That's why they're looking to build and ship numerous TVs throughout 2011 and 2012 that have either Google TV or their own proprietary alternatives built in. The most compelling of these options feature the made-for-TV ability to stream movies from Netflix and allow rentals and purchases from online stores like Amazon on Demand.

    Smart TVs also offer some helpful widgets that display weather, sports scores, program listings, and more, updated in real time from the web. It's a neat idea, and a tempting one if you don't want to pull out your smartphone or laptop in the living room.

    Unfortunately, the early prototypes, conflicting standards, still-unlaunched app stores, and so far unmade content deals make internet TVs a risky investment. What if the manufacturer of your TV drops the ball while its competitor scores a touchdown? You've made a bad play, friend.

    That won't stop the early adopters who have to get these features right away, either for their own use or to show off to friends. If you're one of those folks, go buy a smart TV. We can't stop you!

    [​IMG]
    Option 2: Make your dumb TV smarter
    Maybe you don't want to invest in smart TV right off the bat. That's absolutely fine, because there are already affordable add-on devices that grant all those online features to almost any TV. The number of set-top box (STB) solutions will only grow in the coming months and years, so there's simply no reason to buy a brand new TV just to get online functionality — in fact, it's possible that you'll be better off this way.

    There are already a handful of options on the market — home theater PCs (HTPCs), the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 video game consoles, Apple TV, and the Roku, to name a few. CES 2011 introduced a new twist on this category: the smart TV upgrader. Pioneered by LG, this concept adds many of the features that are included in LG's smart TVs to any TV with an HDMI port. Expect to see more solutions like this in the future.

    Home theater PCs provide access to the most content and are the most customizable, but they require a bit of technical know-how to set up and they can get expensive if they're built with playing video games in mind. The dedicated gaming consoles are the killer solutions, offering Netflix, Hulu Plus, and extensive rental and purchase libraries in high definition, in addition to all those cinematic games. Unfortunately, they're a little pricey at $250 to $400.

    Apple TV and Roku are a lot more affordable, at around $100 each. They serve a lot of the same content, but Apple TV uses Apple's iTunes TV and movie store, while Roku accesses Amazon's online store for rentals and downloads.

    Whichever of these options you buy, you can bet the companies that make them are very focused on fostering an ideal user experience and nabbing as much content as they can. These comparatively well-established platforms might be a better bet for the first couple of years of the internet TV revolution, but it's worth noting that not all of them offer the same web browsing features you'll get with something like Google TV. They're mostly dedicated to delivering videos from the internet to your living room screen.

    Option 3: Steer clear of the revolution
    Though we believe streaming video on your TV is here to stay (and just getting started, even), other internet features like search, widgets, and social networks aren't proven with the general public. Nobody's sure yet whether or not those features will catch on. After all, our desktop computers, laptops, and mobile phones already do all of that, and now it looks like tablets are entering the fray, too. Do you really need these features on your TV when you can just whip out your iPhone or Android tablet to get the same content?

    It seems likely that solutions that are closely integrated with TV shows themselves will be the most successful (the long-considered "interactive viewer experience"), but we're not seeing a lot of that just yet. So far, the experience just consists of offering basic features such as searching and other web-like features on your TV. Who needs it? Maybe not you.

    It wouldn't be crazy to sit this one out and see where it goes. These early internet TVs don't do anything incredible enough to revolutionize the way you watch TV yet. It might happen, but not in 2011. So if you're not an early adopter at heart, you're better off saving your money and buying a regular TV.

    Just make sure you grab a set-top box or game console for watching Netflix, and you should be covered — in case the revolution is televised after all.


    SOURCE
     
  8. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Samsung and Directv to Deliver RVU-Compatible Production Television

    Wed, 12 Jan 2011



    RVU-compatible Production Televisions


    Jan 12, 2011

    At the International [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]Consumer [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]Electronics[/FONT][FONT=inherit ! important]Show [/FONT][/FONT], Directv and Samsung Electronics Co. announced they have partnered to present RVU-compatible production televisions, which will provide more than 19.1 million Directv subscribers with the ability to watch live broadcast and stored content from their [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]DVR[/FONT][/FONT] on Samsung Smart TVs, without the need for additional set-top boxes.



    As founding members of the RVU Alliance, Samsung and Directv reported that they are committed to providing a more seamless entertainment experience for consumers across multiple rooms and a variety of screens, through the use of standardized Remote User Interface (RUI) technology.



    The RVU protocol will be supported on Samsung's [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]LED[/FONT][/FONT] D6000, LED D6400 and LED 6420 TV products that reflect the company's commitment to delivering consumers visually enhanced and connected entertainment experiences in their home. A RUI technology based on industry standards such as DLNA and UPnP, the groups noted that RVU allows a set-top box server to provide a [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]multi[/FONT][/FONT]-room, complete viewing experience that includes DVR services, without the need for additional set-top boxes in homes that have more than one connected TV.



    "We are very happy to be working with an esteemed [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]satellite[/FONT][/FONT][FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important] provider[/FONT][/FONT] like DIRECTV and provide the world first RVU service to consumers with Samsung TV," said Boo-Keun Yoon, president of Samsung's Visual Display Business. "Products developed on RVU standards, one of the major RUI standards, will help accelerate the development of features and [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]application[/FONT][/FONT]that can provide our customers with a truly customizable, immersive entertainment experience that can be enjoyed from the comfort of the home."



    "The CES demonstration of the first RVU compliant [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]television[/FONT][/FONT] is exciting news for the industry and consumers who want a consistent, superior user experience throughout the home," said Romulo Pontual, CTO of Directv. "Making Directv features and content available to Samsung's televisions through the RVU server allows consumers to enjoy our innovative service without the need for additional set-top boxes. We are pleased to see our successful partnership with Samsung expand to include support for RVU in their 2011 model range."



    Capable of supporting multiple connected televisions, Directv's RVU server enables the UI and features to be displayed directly on those connected TVs. Under this partnership, the groups said that Samsung will embed support for RVU in their smart TVs and provide its customers with the full DIRECTV experience, including DVR services, live pause abilities on all screens in the home, 200 hours worth of shared storage, picture-in-picture capabilities and the power to record up to five shows at once. Samsung's RVU-compatible TVs will be available in March 2011.



    Samsung Electronics is a global company focusing on [FONT=inherit ! important][FONT=inherit ! important]semiconductor[/FONT][/FONT], telecommunication, digital media and digital convergence technologies .

    Directv is a video service delivering technology, programming, and sports packages to its customers in the U.S. and Latin America.



    More Information:
    SAMSUNG
    DIRECTV.com
    Samsung @ CES 2011





    SOURCE
     
  9. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    January 5, 2011

    CES: Yahoo pumps up Connected TV; D-Link announces box for it

    [​IMG]




    VEGAS--Yahoo's Connected TV, its widget framework for TVs, is a low-cost way to bring Internet content to televisions. Yahoo's TV widgets don't give you the full Internet flexibility of a product like Google TV, but Yahoo Connected TV is cheap to build: it's available with a $250 22-inch Vizio set, for example. We first saw this platform at CES 2009, but for 2011 Yahoo is adding some features and partners to the initiative, including a standalone set-top manufacturer, D-Link.



    The biggest new feature is content-aware technology. The Connected TV platform now knows what you're watching on your TV, and can overlay widget content that's directly related to it, like stats for sports viewers, interactive games for kids' shows, and "buy now" links for shopping broadcasts. It's somewhat cool in that it works not just with live content but with streamed or recorded content as well: The Connected TV software listens to the audio signature of what you're playing and uses that to match it with widget content that it then delivers over broadband. So you can get the full interactive experience even for month-old shows on your Tivo.



    At CES, Yahoo announced a half-dozen partners that are experimenting with content-aware apps for the platform: networks Showtime, ABC, CBS (CNET's parent company), and HSN, and advertisers Ford and Mattel.
    [​IMG] D-Link plans to launch a set-top box for Yahoo Connected TV in the first half of 2011.
    (Credit: Rafe Needleman/CNET)
    Yahoo and D-Link were also showing the first standalone Yahoo Connected TV set-top box, an as-yet unnamed, unpriced--but "under $200...hopefully much under"--box that can add Connected TV capabilities to any television set. It joins D-Link's other set-top boxes, the Boxee box for content delivery and a WiDi box for showing computer content.
    I'd say that if the D-Link box sells for more than $49 it's not going to go far, because it doesn't actually deliver much in the way of new content. And while it does deliver a type of information and interactivity that isn't available any other way, for only $59 consumers can get a Roku device that will open up whole new worlds of content for their television sets. There is potential in the Yahoo Connected TV platform, but there's also a chicken-and-egg issue for content creators. The more the capability is a freebie in TV hardware, the more valuable it becomes as a content and advertising platform. The platform might work better as a software appendage on a TiVo or cable company DVR.
     
  10. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    [​IMG]


    Disney might bring ABC, ESPN content to Yahoo! Connected TV

    January 11, 2011


    Yahoo! Connected TV might get some content and support that Google TV currently lacks: programming from the networks owned by Walt Disney Co.


    Disney reps are reportedly in talks with Yahoo to create widgets that would provide access to content from ESPN, ABC, The Disney Channel and other Disney-owned networks. Yahoo has been lacking in bringing on primetime content from major networks, while at the same time ABC and Fox have blocked Google TV from already-free episodes on their websites.


    So if this works out for Yahoo, it could be a major coup. But only if they manage to squeeze out a deal that includes full, recent episodes (at least from ABC for major hits like Grey’s Anatomy and Modern Family) rather than just clips and previews. Otherwise, Yahoo’s widgets will be rather useless.


    SOURCE
     
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    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Yahoo, Samsung expand Yahoo Connected TV to 26 more countries



    November 2, 2010
    [​IMG]
    Extending a partnership in place since 2009, Yahoo! and Samsung are teaming up to bring the Yahoo! Connected TV service to an additional 26 European nations.


    That brings the grand total to 135 countries across Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia. Service is delivered directly to Samsung-branded TVs in 39 countries, but it is available on sets from a few other makers, like LG and Sony, too.


    In case you aren’t familiar with the product, Yahoo! Connected TV is more of a widget-based set-up when compared to other Internet TV interfaces. Like most Internet TV services out there, Yahoo! Connected TV has widgets for some familiar sites like YouTube, Facebook, Flickr and Twitter. Subscribers can also be connected to more International stations like Sky News and Bild News, popular portals like eBay, and plenty of online gaming sites.


    To solidify the partnership a little more, Samsung will also be adding a fullscreen Yahoo! user interface to its own Internet TV service soon.




    SOURCE
     
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    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    5 Reasons Connected TV Could Flop in 2011




    [​IMG]
    Jeremy Toeman has worked in the field of convergence between computers, the Internet and TV for more than 10 years. He is a founding partner of Stage Two, a consumer technology product experience firm in San Francisco, and can be found blogging at livedigitally.com.


    Forget Google TV scrapping CES, the biggest challenge smart televisions face in 2011 is overcoming customers’ FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt).
    Up until the early 2000s, buying a new TV was easy. The bigger the screen, the better the television. Sure, some televisions had more bells and better whistles, but in the era of standard definition and cathode ray tubes, bigger was better.

    When high definition flat screens became affordable in the middle of the last decade, consumers still felt pretty comfortable buying a new television. With the exception of 720p vs. 1080p and LCD vs. plasma (and a few other little things), there was not a lot of FUD for consumers. People understood (for the most part) the technology they were getting and the value it provided them. They also more or less understood the product life cycle their television provided them.


    Now enter smart TVs and 3-D TVs. To the industry, these devices represent an opportunity to upsell consumers with added benefits and features. But to consumers, these connected televisions also introduce planned obsolescence into television life cycles. Planned obsolescence is a concept where companies sell products with a limited lifespan or functionality to encourage repeat purchases and upgrades. The result? Consumers are staying away from new TV. Instead of getting excited for new features, they are getting scared. To quote a recent industry article: “Despite all the hype, 3-D sets haven’t been a runaway success, and Internet-capable ones haven’t fared much better.”


    Why is this happening? Sure, a slow economy is one reason, but there are others that are more concerning to television makers and the consumer electronics industry as a whole. It’s my opinion that FUD is a major factor in 3-D TV failure as well. Consumers’ questions include: Do I need more glasses? Does it work with my Blu-ray? Will all titles be compatible?

    1. The Internet on TV Sounds Confusing

    [​IMG]For average consumers, the thought of hooking up the Internet to their television set sounds confusing. Many wonder what they will have to do to make a smart TV work with their existing home theater setup. People understand a cable box and an AV receiver – sort of (hence the “input one” problem that plagues the industry). Adding the Internet into that equation is off-putting for many people who just want to watch Top Chef. Emphasizing ease of use and simple connectivity should be a main concern for television manufacturers in 2011.

    2. The Internet on TV Is Confusing

    Most Internet TVs have a poor user interface and force users to confront awkward technology questions (for example, are you using WEP or WPA?). These are issues users don’t enjoy resolving. Conjoining home networking with the home theater just doesn’t sound like fun to consumers. They want to watch their new television without a call to tech support, and that is understandable. Delivering products that are simple to set up and easy to use should be a main concern for television manufacturers. Just because there’s a “pretty” new user interface with humongous buttons to click on and an up/down/left/right interface doesn’t make it a great user experience.

    3. Fear of Obsolescence

    Before smart TVs arrived, a TV was just a TV. Now a TV is an app store and a browser and so much more. Users will worry that the Internet TV they purchase this year will be outdated in six months. That kind of product cycle is fine for a phone, but it makes less sense for a large TV. Add in turf wars between Apple, Google and others and you have an unstable, rapidly iterating media landscape that most consumers fear to enter. To catch on, new televisions need to demonstrate staying power and reassure consumers that they will still work well in 2015.

    4. Customer Support Concerns

    Something we’ve all learned through PCs is the incredible ability to “pass the buck” on customer support problems introduced by high tech products. For example, when you can’t get a video game to play right on your laptop, and you call Dell, its support staff will probably tell you it’s a problem with NVIDIA’s drivers, and they tell you it’s actually Microsoft’s fault, and if they even return your call or e-mail, they tell you it’s really EA’s problem, who of course sends you back to Dell (all just to play a video game!).
    That’s a long-winded example, but consumers are unfortunately used to that type of service, and nobody likes the idea of calling Samsung’s support people and having them tell you it’s a problem with your Netgear router, who in turn point the finger at your Comcast Internet provider, and they turn you over to Netflix, who sends you back to Samsung (all just to watch a movie!).

    5. Poorly Defined Value Proposition

    [​IMG]As I wrote in my last Mashable post, most smart TVs are being touted for their technology rather than the benefits they provide people. Instead of telling people that the weather app is on their TV (a feature), the industry should emphasize the personal weather forecasts smart TVs generate that are tailored for individual needs (a benefit). For the average consumer, Facebook on TV sounds like a lot of work (“Where will I type? Do I still “Like” stuff? Does FarmVille work? What else do I need to do?”). Putting Twitter on the television sounds like it is a lot of work. Anything that involves a mouse and a keyboard seems — and is — onerous to the living room context. The value proposition for smart TVs has to be the effortless delivery of content in ways that mirror the ease of standard TV experience.


    If smart televisions want to catch on, manufacturers and advertisers must communicate their ease of use, benefits and staying power to overcome consumer fears. Manufacturers must make it crystal clear that smart TVs are a safe, long-term investment that will work in a landscape of changing technologies and content services.


    SOURCE
     

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