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New Software Battles Coming To Smart TVs

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Jan 6, 2014.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    New Software Battle Coming To Smart TVs : NPR (click for full article)

    by Associated Press - Jan. 6, 2014

    -- NEW YORK (AP) - More choice - and confusion - is coming to the next generation of TVs.


    At least three new software systems were announced Monday for Internet-connected television sets, which let viewers watch Internet video and interact with friends online on the big screen. The new smart TV operating systems will compete with software already available from Google and individual TV manufacturers.


    The slew of options is in contrast to the smartphone market, where just two operating systems - Apple's iOS and Google's Android - dominate.


    But more consumer choice will also mean more difficulties for services such as Hulu and Netflix to write apps. As a result, app selection on any given TV will be limited.


    To fully enjoy the range of Internet video on the TV, many consumers will still have to buy a separate device such as Apple TV and Roku - and then figure out how to install it. Those devices cost about $100, though Google sells a $35 Chromecast device with fewer features.


    TV manufacturers have been pushing smart TVs to give consumers a reason to upgrade their sets more frequently. The Internet capability also keeps the TV central to households, even as people spend more time watching Internet video.


    But so far, apps on smart TVs aren't as extensive as what's found on phones and stand-alone streaming devices, in part because no one operating system has enough users to make it a priority for app makers.


    "I keep hoping we will see convergence," said Colin Dixon, chief analyst at nScreen Media, a research firm in Sunnyvale, Calif. "Unfortunately we keep seeing the number of operating systems . increasing, not decreasing."


    Chet Kanojia, whose Aereo online television service has been trying to expand onto more devices, said the tendency for TV set manufacturers to differentiate their systems with unique features turns app development into "a royal pain." That's because Aereo's engineers have to write new apps for each one.


    The announcements at the International CES gadget show in Las Vegas include:


    Read more at: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=260185700
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2014
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    CES 2014: The death of Roku, and can UHDTV succeed where 3D TV failed? | ExtremeTech (click for full article)

    by Sebastian Anthony - Jan. 6, 2014

    -- If CES 2013 was the death of 3D TV, then CES 2014 is the death of Roku, Chromecast, Apple TV, and other digital media streamers/players. With the continued push towards smart TVs with built-in streaming apps, 4K displays that have an embedded Android media player, UHDTVs breaking below $1000, and news that Roku will release a line of TVs that come pre-loaded with the company's streaming software, the standalone media streamer is fast approaching the end of its life.


    For the last five years, media streamers have taken massive advantage of the rather odd fact that most households go a very long time between TV upgrades. Historically, the upgrade cycle was around eight years. In recent years, with the release of the HDTV spec and free-to-air digital broadcasts, a lot of households interrupted their usual upgrade cycle and jumped on the HDTV bandwagon. For the most part, though, if a household already has a circa-2007 42-inch 1080p TV (which they bought at great expense), they are in no rush to upgrade.


    Read more at: http://www.extremetech.com/computin...roku-and-can-uhdtv-succeed-where-3d-tv-failed
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2014
  4. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Roku is doing fine, it isn't about to die. I doubt if the HDTV with Roku built in will sell 10% of the number of Roku streaming boxes next year, but even that number should be considered a success. Roku is just expanding its market as it should but the big seller will remain the tiny little streaming box, at least that is the way I see it. The college championship game I am watching using Roku is at halftime now.
     
  5. Greenenergyassessors

    Greenenergyassessors New Member

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    No big fat Tv Manufacturer is going to tell me when to upgrade, regardless of what comes with it. I'm happy with a bogstandard 1080p TV and a few media players.
     
  6. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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  7. sparkyscott21

    sparkyscott21 Moderator Staff Member

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    Sony on Tuesday at CES 2014 announced plans to launch a cloud-based TV service that will combine live TV, with video on-demand and DVR capabilities, allowing users to stream content from the cloud to their chosen connected devices without requiring them to purchase an additional box. The company said that the unnamed TV service will work on a variety of Sony devices, but also on other devices that have access to the Internet. The service will be tested in the U.S. later this year, although the company did not mention any pricing details or release plans for it.

    Sony supported its announcement by revealing that based on the daily number of people streaming videos in the U.S., Sony’s network would make the top five U.S. cable and satellite providers. According to the company, there are more than 70,000,000 Internet-enabled Sony devices that could access such a TV service in the U.S. alone, of which 25 million are represented by PlayStation 3 consoles. The “old” console happens to currently be the number one device in the world for watching Netflix in the living room.

    The service will have an “intuitive, dynamic interface that gets to know you” and will offer them personalized menus, as well as custom channels to meet their needs. Furthermore, the service will let users search across live TV and on-demand programs, provide a viewing history, and engage with friends. They’ll be able to pause video streaming on one device, and pick it up on another gadget later, Sony said, but a video demo of the cloud-based TV service or user interface was not offered.





    1-7-14

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  8. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    The Sony cloud service sounds interesting - and hopefully they would make it available on GTV devices. However I'm a bit leery of it succeeding. Intel tried a live TV service and it turned into vaporware. The problem as I see it is not technology related - but rather in cutting the necessary content deals. The article also said: "but a video demo of the cloud-based TV service or user interface was not offered." So that didn't exactly raise my confidence level. Although previously it was announced that Sony and Viacom had a preliminary deal for Sony's planned TV service (so that deal would be a positive if it's finalized).

    http://www.googletvforum.org/forum/...m-finalizing-tv-service-deal-report-says.html
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2014
  9. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Samsung's Wii-like smart remote has buttons and moves to spare | The Verge (click for full article & photos)

    by Josh Lowensohn - Jan. 7, 2014

    -- Samsung's trying to be a little less square. Its new smart TV remote, debuting at CES, does away with the sharp corners for curved edges, while tweaking the touchpad to combine four-way directional buttons. The end result is 80 percent smaller than last year's model.


    There are still voice controls that can change channels and launch apps like YouTube, but new are motion controls that let you zip around on-screen menus. Samsung's also added a button to watch two programs at once, side-by-side, which was not there in last year's remote. Some of these things have been replaced by Samsung's higher-end model TVs, which let you change channels and control other functions with hand gestures.


    SMALLER, BUT WITH MORE FEATURES


    After playing with it briefly here at the show, it feels quite good in your hand, with a rubbery back that looks a lot like a zeppelin. The control scheme can be swapped on the fly between motion gestures and a four-way directional pad. That touchpad has been shrunk down from last year's square design, but still lets you slide your finger to move around. All that results in a lot of ways to jump from menu to menu, something that might keep it from being forgotten in the couch.


    The remote replaces last year's model, and will ship with select Samsung Smart TV sets.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2014
  10. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    2014: The year connected TVs go simple | CES 2014 - CNET Blogs (click for full article)

    by Joan E. Solsman - Jan. 7, 2014

    Summary: Sony, LG, Hisense, and TCL enjoyed the CES spotlight for a deceptive innovation in TVs: Keep them simple, stupid. This may be the year Internet-connected TVs come into their own, but is that enough?


    -- At this year's Consumer Electronics Show, some TV makers are getting big props for a TV innovation -- simplicity -- that feels out of fashion at a confab that breathlessly idolizes bells and whistles.


    Amid TVs that morph from flat to curved at the touch of a button and Ultra HD sets bigger than the standard American household door, TCL and Hisense announced they would integrate Roku streaming right into their televisions -- no box required. A bigger rival, LG, unveiled an operating system for its 2014 TVs, WebOS, that promises improved on-screen navigation by marrying simple on-screen "cards" that launch apps like Netflix with the company's Magic Motion remote -- one of CNET's favorite.


    In the biggest revelation, Sony said it would begin to pilot a cloud-based TV service this year that combines live television content with on-demand and DVR, all searchable across those categories and delivered over the Internet. The Japanese computing and entertainment conglomerate provided only scant details of the venture that, until now, had been reportedly on its slate but hadn't been publicly confirmed. But the virtual pay-TV service it is promising has been an aspiration for the biggest names in tech. The complications of delivering it most recently foiled the ambitions of Intel, which came close to launching its similar On Cue service last year only for a new CEO to lose interest in the project because of its risks.


    Read more: http://www.cnet.com/8301-35284_1-57616666/2014-the-year-connected-tvs-go-simple/#ixzz2plmvyW8C
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2014
  11. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    IQ test: the state of smart TVs at CES 2014 | The Verge (click for full article)

    by Chris Welch - January 10, 2014

    -- TVs have never looked better than they do at CES 2014. Gorgeous displays are all over the show floor, showcasing awe-inspiring demo footage. This year, perhaps more than ever before, TV manufacturers have all committed to following a similar hardware path: they're building big, beautiful, and nearly indistinguishable televisions. But there's one disheartening trend that remains alive and well this year: terrible software.


    Technology giants like Samsung are seasoned experts when it comes to building quality TVs, but they've gotten no better at designing the software that controls them. User interfaces remain overwrought with unnecessary bloat, sacrificing speed and intuitiveness for features that most humans will never use. In 2014, smart TVs remain caught in a struggle between brand differentiation and usability. And too many consumers are losing as a result.


    Read more at: http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/10/5284828/iq-test-the-state-of-smart-tvs-ces-2014
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2014

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