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Netflix Rolls Out 3D And Super HD Videos

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Netflix rolls out 3D and Super HD videos | News | Geek.com (click for full article)

    Jan. 9, 2013 (1:27 pm) By: Mark Raby


    "A handful of 3D titles are now available to stream from Netflix, but only for users with Internet service providers that support the video streaming site's Open Connect CDN service. Netflix launched Open Connect last year as a way of bypassing the usual third-party content delivery infrastructure and instead getting its videos to the end user as seamlessly as possible.


    For the millions of people who already have access to Netflix's Open Connect distribution (and probably didn't even know it), the news is pretty cool. The video streaming site now offers a huge slew of its content in "Super HD" quality. Users can see even better resolution when playing back movies on game consoles, Roku boxes, or high-end computers, provided they get at least 7 Mbps bandwidth speeds from their Internet provider.


    In addition, a handful of 3D titles have joined the Netflix catalog. So far this pretty much is just comprised of the typical demo content fare of sporting events (Red Bull action sports, to be precise) as well as nature documentaries that were filmed solely to show off 3D technology. These documentaries were originally aired on the DirecTV network 3net, which ceased its 24/7 operations last year.


    Of course, just like anything else, there is a whole underground bureaucracy in the world of content delivery so not everyone is on board, but Netflix has managed to sign on numerous regional ISPs. The usual suspects who don't like to acquiesce to anything out of the standard protocol (e.g., Time Warner Cable) will be a little more difficult to convince, but surprisingly enough Cablevision has joined the service so hopefully it is just a matter of time before the rest of the stubborn ones do as well."
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    In The Fight Between Netflix And Cable Operators, High-Quality Streaming Video Is Being Held Hostage | TechCrunch (click for full article)

    "Last week at CES, Netflix announced that a number of ISPs had adopted its Open Connect technology, which provides a more direct connection between it and a cable operator, lowering the cost of delivery and increasing the quality of its streaming video. And for those who do participate, Netflix has a bonus: Due to those efficiencies, it will be able to offer up Super HD and 3D video to their broadband subscribers.


    But here's the flip side: One cable provider is arguing that because Netflix isn't offering it Super HD or 3D content, that it is essentially discriminating against ISPs based on whether they deploy Open Connect boxes. Time Warner Cable sent a statement to Multichannel News which reads:


    "While they call it 'Open Connect,' Netflix is actually closing off access to some of its content while seeking unprecedented preferential treatment from ISPs... We believe it is wrong for Netflix to withhold any content formats from our subscribers and the subscribers of many other ISPs. Time Warner Cable's network is more than capable of delivering this content to Netflix subscribers today."


    Forgetting the irony of a cable provider for preferential treatment of the services it provides over their network, here's the real punchline to this story. If Netflix weren't witholding Super HD content, Time Warner Cable would likely be crying foul over how the streams its subscribers generate were choking its network and slowing down data connections for everyone. It's true - Time Warner Cable can deliver that content today, but in doing so, it would be creating incredible strain on network peering points, and it would drive up Netflix's CDN costs.


    The whole point of Netflix's Open Connect is to relieve that strain and to make delivery of high-quality video more efficient for all parties involved. And doing so makes ultra high-quality and 3D video delivery more affordable and actually kind of tenable. In that sense, providing access to providers who are willing to directly peer with Netflix and cache locally only makes sense.


    But making sense doesn't always count when you're an incumbent video provider and you have a smaller competitor nipping at your heels with a lower-priced offering. Netflix already takes up about a quarter of all peak downstream traffic.


    Even so, Netflix can't match the quality that can be delivered via coax - not over IP - and Time Warner Cable and other incumbent providers have little incentive to enable it to do so. By installing Open Connect boxes free of charge and peering with Netflix, cable companies would basically be giving it the tools to also offer comparable picture quality. But why would they?


    Meanwhile, some cable providers - most notably Comcast - have used their last-mile connections as a competitive advantage against streaming video services. At a time where data caps loom large, Comcast enabled its streaming video service delivered via Xbox game consoles to operate without counting against those caps. Not so for Netflix, Hulu, or other streaming services available via Xbox.


    Time Warner Cable isn't Comcast. And one of the reasons that this fight with Netflix is especially surprising is that, unlike Comcast, Time Warner Cable has been pretty straightforward about leading with its broadband services rather than its video services. It recognizes that in the future one of its key differentiators will be its ability to quickly deliver Internet services - including streaming video services - to its subscribers.


    If Time Warner Cable were really serious about that, it would work with Netflix on making its delivery better. Instead, it's blaming Netflix for not clogging its network further."
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Can Netflix OpenConnect succeed without the biggest ISPs? | ZDNet (via Mowser) (click for full article)

    Summary: Will the Netflix CDN be able to fit in the world of ISP/Content provider mergers and customer consolidation?


    By David Chernicoff for Five Nines: The Next Gen Datacenter | June 28, 2013 -- 18:04 GMT (11:04 PDT)


    "It's been a year since I first told you about Netflix OpenConnect and their drive to get the appliance into the datacenters of ISPs throughout their coverage area. With a goal off caching content at a huge number of locations so that future failures of the backend host (Amazon AWS) would be minimized, Netflix hoped that by getting the cached content at ISP POPs and allowing the OpenConnect boxes to communicate without requiring the Amazon backend would not only limit the damage of potential backend failure, but that they would also be able to reduce their overall bandwidth demand on the public Internet.


    A year later and Netflix has distributed the OpenConnect appliance to hundreds of ISPs and there has been only a single major hiccough in data delivery when Amazon once again failed them over the Christmas holiday in 2012. But the success of the OpenConnect appliance program has been limited by one major factor; the largest ISPs in the country aren't interested in playing ball.


    A report in the Wall Street Journal claimed that big guns Comcast, AT&T, Time Warner, and Verizon were not willing at this time to give Netflix space in their datacenters, expressing concern that doing so for Netflix would allow other content providers, such as Amazon, to demand the same access. And while there is some validity to that argument, it should also be noted that at least three of those ISPs are also in the business of content providing, and improving the performance of Netflix is certainly not in their interest.


    While there is always the claim that the customer has the option to switch to a provider that is more open, the reality is that in many regions those four big players are the only choice for high-performance ISP services, so switching from one to the other changes nothing in terms of accessing content delivery networks other than that provided by the ISP. And as the Comcast - NBC merger shows, those ISPs are also interested in getting into the content producing business, further minimizing their interest in improving the service Netflix provides to their customers.


    Only time will tell what direction this issue is going to go, but it's a reasonable bet that someone will be asking the government to get involved."
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2013
  4. Carlszone

    Carlszone Well-Known Member

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    Netflix will win!

    But it is a matter of time and consumers have not shown the patience needed for companies like Netflix to complete the transitions needed to adequately fight the monopoly in America's last big scandal. The idea of free enterprise gets lost in all the proprietary big dealing, and the newbies can easily get cancelled out. But Netflix has proved that they are competitive enough to stay in the game.

    Comcast, TWC, and unmentioned but a real player, Cox are all on the outer fringes of this new technology. Who wins????

    Not the cable companies or the networks, that's for sure...

    You'll see...

    Later

    Carl
     
  5. dtaylor

    dtaylor Member

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    Did Time Warner Cable work out a deal with Netflix? As of today I see "Super HD" next to the five star rating when using the Netflix app on my Sony.

    Sent from my Nook HD+ using Tapatalk 4 Beta
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2013
  6. revue5

    revue5 Well-Known Member

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  7. dtaylor

    dtaylor Member

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    Must have been a temporary hiccup. "Super HD" no longer shows up in the app and TWC is still not supported according to the link.

    Sent from my Nook HD+ using Tapatalk 4 Beta
     

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