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Music Labels Get Huge Victory In Quest To Sue Grooveshark Out Of Business

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Oct 1, 2014.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Music labels get huge victory in quest to sue Grooveshark out of business | The Verge (click for full article)

    By Chris Welch on October 1, 2014 12:59 pm @chriswelch

    -- It appears Grooveshark's days are just about numbered. The music sharing service has been dealt what could easily amount to a death blow by a US District Court judge, which found that Grooveshark's own employees personally (and willfully) violated and profited from copyright infringement. It's been a long saga; Grooveshark has faced lawsuit after lawsuit in recent years. It's managed to overcome some by striking deals with publishers, but vengeful music labels haven't given up on sinking the company.

    See more at: Music labels get huge victory in quest to sue Grooveshark out of business | The Verge
     
  2. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I always find it funny how authors of articles on copyright infringement legal cases try to make the music companies the villains. Grooveshark is either complying with copyright laws or it isn't. There is no evil conspiracy between music companies and the courts, if the music companies don't file suit to enforce the laws, nobody else will. I tend to find the courts get it right, the evidence doesn't lie.

    A quest to sue Grooveshark out of business? I sure don't see it that way.
     
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I read the full article and it didn't come across to me that the author was painting music companies as the villain at all. I'll admit that the title of the article is misleading. Did you read the full article? The author sounds like he definitely thinks Grooveshark was the villain.

    From the article:

    ** Way back in 2007, Greenberg demanded that his workers help the cause by sharing their own MP3s, obtained from who knows where, on the service:

    "Download as many MP3’s as possible, and add them to the folders you’re sharing on Grooveshark. Some of us are setting up special "seed points" to house tens or even hundreds of thousands of files, but we can’t do this alone… There is no reason why ANYONE in the company should not be able to do this, and I expect everyone to have this done by Monday… IF I DON’T HAVE AN EMAIL FROM YOU IN MY INBOX BY MONDAY, YOU’RE ON MY OFFICIAL **** LIST. " **

    And then there was this:

    ** If that evidence weren't damning enough, Griesa also found that Grooveshark deleted data crucial to the case, including documents listing uploaded files — likely in an attempt to save itself. **

    How is this reporting damning to the music companies? It paints Grooveshark in the wrong.
     
  4. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I read enough, the vengeful music companies? As if it is about vengeance as opposed to enforcing copyright laws. An article with statements like that and a title like that is distracting from what is really going on.
     

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