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LG Buys WebOS From HP For Use In Smart TVs

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    LG buys webOS from HP for use in smart TVs | The Verge (click for full article)

    By Sam Byford on February 25, 2013 04:07 am

    "We might not be seeing new phones, but webOS is still alive in some form, at least: LG has reportedly agreed to buy the rights to the OS from HP and use it in smart TVs. According to CNET, the Korean manufacturer has acquired source code, employees, patents, and more in the deal, of which financial details are yet to be disclosed. Last year we heard that LG was working on a smart TV based on Open webOS and hoped to show it off at CES - that didn't come to pass, of course, but it turns out there was some truth to the rumors.


    THERE WAS SOME TRUTH TO THE RUMORS


    Skott Ahn, LG's president and chief technology officer, says "It creates a new path for LG to offer an intuitive user experience and internet services across a range of consumer electronics devices." There's no indication of whether the deal will affect the Smart TV Alliance, which LG helped set up last year in an attempt to provide a unified software ecosystem for connected televisions; Toshiba and Panasonic are also members of the group.


    The webOS team will reportedly set up base in LG's new Silicon Valley facilities, though CNET notes that many who worked on mobile products for HP after the webOS acquisition have already left the company. It seems that while LG has no intention to move away from Android for use in its own phones, its experience with Google TV left a lot to be desired.


    Update: HP has confirmed the acquisition to The Verge and clarified that the associated Palm and WebOS patents will be licensed to LG."
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    So what does this deal imply for LG's future Google TV aspirations? LG showed off several new GTV televisions at CES in January and those new models were slated to come to market within several months.

    Not a promising development for GTV IMO............
     
  3. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I can't make any sense of it. Since WebOS is not anything close to a smart TV operating system, I don't really thing this will work out too well. Exactly how is LG going to get developers to make smart TV apps for WebOS? Pretty strange concept, not happy with a smart TV platform that only has a small percentage of the market, switch to one with zero percent and hope for the best.
     
  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    What LG (click for full article)

    What LG's webOS Buy Means For Google TV

    by Janko Roettgers - February 25th, 2013

    SUMMARY:
    LG is buying webOS from HP to tun it into a Smart TV operating system. The question is: Where does that leave Google TV?


    -- "LG is buying HP's troubled mobile operating system webOS, according to reports from CNET and the Verge. However, the company doesn't want to put the system to use in any of its phones: Instead, LG plans to use webOS to power its smart TVs. That could be bad news for Google, which has been cooperating with LG on getting Google TV into the hands of consumers.


    The deal between LG and HP includes the webOS source code, documentation, websites and what's remaining of the webOS team. Cloud components such as the webOS app store technology as well as all of the patents will remain with HP, but are going to be licensed to LG. There's no word on the purchase price.


    Most of LG's smart TVs have been powered by the company's own app platform, which was originally called NetCast and has been ripe for a refresh for some time. The company also has an ongoing partnership with Google to sell Google TV devices, and in fact has been expanding this partnership in recent months.


    LG started to sell two high-end Google TV sets in 2012. In 2013, it will come out with a total of seven models. But consider how LG CTO Skott Ahn announced these models at the company's 2013 press conference:


    "We will continue to serve our Android fans with an extended lineup of Google TV."


    In other words: LG's Google TVs are, at least for now, niche products for enthusiasts, and LG apparently doesn't think that will change anytime soon. That's why the company is looking to replace its own smart TV operating system with webOS, instead of relying 100 percent on Google TV.


    That's bad news for Google TV, but it also shows how Google's living room play has been changing over recent months. Google originally courted a number of big TV manufacturers for Google TV, with the idea of having the system embedded in a wide variety of TV sets. Sony was one of the first to make Google TVs, LG came on board for the second generation, and Samsung seemed to be ready to go Google as well by early 2012.


    A year later, things look very different: Samsung's Google TV never materialized. Sony stopped selling Google TV sets and instead opted for a companion box. And now, LG is buying its own smart TV operating system.


    Does that mean Google TV is doomed? Hardly. The platform has seen some significant adoption in recent months: Asus, Netgear, Hisense and TCL all showed off new Google TV devices at CES, and WD is apparently working on its own Google TV box as well. Earlier this month, a total of 20 hardware partners came together in Seoul to collaborate on the future of Google TV.


    But it looks like Google TV settling into a role as a companion box solution, as opposed to a default smart TV choice for the big manufacturers."
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013
  6. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Ha, LG thinks that is a good plan? As if the fragmented smart TV market is not already confused, LG offers two platforms, one struggling, one will be stillborn but before WebOS is stillborn, it will confuse the market enough to avoid the struggling platform. I have a couple of LG Blu-ray players with smart TV, I use them for Vudu primarily and have been very happy.
     

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