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Larry Page's Identity Crises: The Dead Weight Of Google+

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Apr 7, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Larry Page's identity crisis: the dead weight of Google+ | ZDNet UK

    "At the start of this year I wrote a piece entitled "Why Google+ is here to stay, like it or not". Well, it turned out people don't like it, and that's a big problem for Google and its leader.


    I maintain the central thesis of that article, which was that Google+ is far too integral to Larry Page's Google to be cast aside like previous social failures Buzz and Wave. But what was a suspicion then is now quite clear - Google+ just isn't gaining traction.


    Failure


    The dead giveaway was the TV ad campaign that kicked off in recent weeks. When I first saw it, my immediate thought was: "You don't see Facebook needing to advertise." The ad shows off Google+'s finest features, such as circles and hangouts, but it wouldn't need to exist if those features were enough to entice the general public.


    It's not like Google+ didn't have a torrent of publicity when it launched. Its early invitation-only stage and the consequent hype ensured blow-by-blow coverage in the general as well as tech-focused media. It had a solid start. Social endeavours either go viral or they don't. We'd know by now.


    Not that we actually do know how many people actively use Google+. Somewhat ominously, Google's claim of 50 million daily active users and 100 million monthly active users is based on a rather odd definition of an active user: anyone who signs into Google services that are 'optimised' for Google+.


    In other words, anyone who signs into Gmail, YouTube or pretty much any Google service, since Page decided that Google+ had to be "baked" into the lot. The real tally for people who seek to be social in Google+ on a daily basis has to be significantly lower than 50 million.


    In my own experience, I only visit Google+ once a week or so, and I don't find much going on. Posts get shared a bit, there's the occasional post that ignites a discussion among the hardcore, but beyond that? The real eye-opener for me was posting, "Is Facebook turning into AOL? Discuss", and receiving not one comment from my hundreds of followers, all of whom are tech people. That question, on Google+. I mean, come on."
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Will Sign-ups Soar with the New UK Google Plus TV Advert? - Blogcritics Sci/Tech (click for full article)

    "Whilst Google+ was advertised in the US back in November, the UK had to wait for this weekend to receive the online giant's mainstream TV marketing.


    Aired during Britain's Got Talent, arguably the country's favourite Saturday night show, with peak viewing figures of 12.6 million, a social network has never exposed itself to the masses in such a way before. So will people in the UK be reaching for their mice this week and setting up G+ profiles?


    The ad follows the life and G+ posts of a fictional character, Tom Barker, whilst popular actor, Benedict Cumberbatch, star of the Sherlock Homes mini-series' reads the monologue starting 'All the world's a stage' from Shakespeare's As You Like It, also known as 'The Seven Ages of Man'. The very neatly packaged and concise ad certainly tugs at your heartstrings in the way Christmas adverts sometimes do.


    It promotes the message that sharing through Google+ is not only like real life, it is real life and subtly suggests that you could be missing out on key points in relationships or forget them if you don't store them in Google's memory bank. Tom's wife, first child, friends and then grandchildren are all in there and you are left with the text, "A life lived and shared. That's a plus."
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    More social, more evil? Larry Page's first year back in the driver seat at Google (click for full article)

    "It's been a year since Larry Page took the reins as CEO of Google. Has the last year - and its focus on social media - helped refine Google, or taken the company further away from its "Don't be evil" mantra?


    One year ago today, Larry Page took over for Eric Schmidt as CEO of Google. Page co-founded Google along with Sergey Brin back in 1998 and served as CEO through 2001. While Page has always been in the thick of Google's product development and strategic direction, much of Google's next decade was characterized by an odd triumvirate: Seasoned exec Eric Schmidt (formerly of Novell and Sun) acted as the titular CEO and the "adult" in the room, while Brin and Page had more-or-less equal weight in corporate decisions.


    With Page's re-ascension to the CEO chair and Schmidt's transition to a more nebulous executive chairman role, Google has attempted to pare itself down, sacrificing projects, bolstering its core businesses, and above all trying to reorient the entire company behind a comprehensive social strategy. Page has proven himself to be one of those "vision" execs, who focuses on long-term success rather than the next quarterly statement.


    What is Page's vision for Google, and how have his moves over the last year helped - and hindered -that strategy? "
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Google expects Motorola Mobility purchase to deliver big returns | ZDNet (click for full article)

    "Summary: As CEO Larry Page expects "great devices" to come from the purchase of Motorola Mobility, what could that mean for other Android ecosystem partners?


    Google is banking big time on its proposed bid for Motorola Mobility, based on a recently published company update from CEO Larry Page.


    According to the letter, Page is expecting "to build great devices capitalizing on the tremendous success and growth of Android and Motorola's long history of technological innovation."


    Google is planning to pay $12.5 billion to acquire Motorola Mobility - a deal that could be considered all but ready to go at this point following approval from both the European Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice.


    When all is said and done, the acquisition of Motorola will give Google a hardware arm, which will presumably concentrate primarily on producing new Android products.


    Nevertheless, even as it will include the development of other products not based on Android, what remains to be seen is how this is going to affect the heavily-fragmented Android ecosystem overall.


    Page and company have repeated (as he did in this memo) for months that Android would remain open to all, but certainly there is going to be room for worry about how Google would be promoting its in-house projects over its competitors, which are incidentally partners too. Makes for a confusing relationship.


    The letter also implies some pressure for Motorola Mobility if/when it comes into the Google fold. Google has already suffered some minor stumbles when it comes to hardware products its teamed on, such as Google TV and Chromebooks as consumer devices. With the addition of Motorola, Google is obviously looking to develop products that will go head-to-head with Apple's iPhone and iPad once and for all.


    Page is hoping that Motorola will deliver. "
     
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Larry Page Posts Huge Letter About Google's Direction | WebProNews (click for full article)

    "Google CEO Larry Page has posted a new update on the company's focus in a nice, lengthy letter on the Google Investor Relations page.


    On Google+,Page writes:


    t's been just over a year since I became CEO again. Instead of our usual Founders' Letter, I wanted to do something different and give you an update on what we are focused on. Top of my priority list has been creating a simpler, more intuitive experience across all our products so users get exactly what they need, right when they want it. While we will always have improvements to make, I am excited about our progress and the opportunities in front of Google today.


    In the letter, Page talks about Google+, Google Search, various devices, the company's long-term focus, privacy, Googlers, and innovation.


    For now, here's the letter in its entirety. We're going to come back to some separate points in separate articles.


    Letter begins: "
     

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