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Is A Google-Branded Chromebook With A Touchscreen In The Works?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Nov 26, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Is a Google-branded Chromebook with a touchscreen in the works? - Liliputing (click for full article)

    "Google already sells a line of smartphones and tablets through the Google Play Store. While technically these devices are made by Samsung, Asus, and LG, they're sold under the Google name.


    According to the China Times, Google could be preparing to do the same thing with an upcoming Chromebook.


    Chromebooks are basically laptops that run Google Chrome OS instead of Windows, OS X, Ubuntu, or other operating systems. In other words, they boot and shut down quickly and feature an operating system designed primarily around a web browser.


    Up until now, Google has partnered with Samsung and Acer to release Chromebooks, with prices ranging from $200 to $550. While they're listed in the Play Store, these laptops are actually sold through retailers such as Amazon and Best Buy.


    But the China Times report suggests Google could work with Taiwanese equipment maker Compal to produce a Chromebook that would be a pure Google device, from head to toe.


    That would allow Google to have even more control over the hardware, price, and physical design than it does over the latest Chromebooks.


    China Times suggests that the Chromebook could have a touchscreen, which makes sense since the Chrome browser can run on the touch-friendly Android operating system as well as Windows, OS X, Linux, and Chrome OS.


    That's about it for the hardware specs revealed in the report though. There's no information about the processor, storage, or other features.


    Chrome OS can run on a range of chips including ARM-based processors and Intel or AMD chips with x86 architecture. While most Chromebooks to date have shipped with 16GB of flash storage, Acer's latest Chromebook has a 320GB hard drive, so there's no telling what kind of hardware a Google-branded Chromebook might feature."
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Wow a Google Nexus Chromebook sounds like it could really be a cool device. I'm wondering if Google could/will offer a Chromebook that could dual-boot to android OS? IMO that would be the ultimate device because it would have all the Chrome plug-ins from the Chrome Store, along with the android apps from Google Play Store, - plus the latest desktop Flash version (through the Pepper Flash plug-in).

    Chromebooks can already dual-boot to Ubuntu OS.

    The one thing I would be curious about (if Chromebooks dual-booted to android) - is if sites like Hulu would start blocking it? Or would they only block the android OS version and not the Chrome OS version? Oh sooo many possibilities -:)
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Why Google might market a touchscreen Chromebook | PCWorld (click for full article)

    "Google may be planning to cap off the new wave of Chromebooks with its own laptop that includes a touchscreen, according to one report.

    The story in China Times, spotted by TechCrunch, claims that Google has already ordered the touchscreen netbooks from Compal, a Taiwan-based manufacturer. In the past, Chromebook vendors such as Samsung and Acer have placed the manufacturing orders, but this time, Google ordered the devices itself, leading to speculation that the next Chromebook will be purely Google-branded.


    It's not crazy to think that Google would release a touchscreen Chromebook. The development site for Chromium has posted tablet interface mockups in the past, and in April 2011, Google confirmed that it was working on a tablet version of its browser-based operating system, though the company didn't say whether any products would come of it.


    In addition, many Chrome OS Web apps already work well on touchscreens. (Try the Chrome version of Tweetdeck on a Windows 8 tablet, for instance, and you'll be pleasantly surprised.)"
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    With Google readying its own Nexus Chromebook, will it marry Chrome OS to Android? | ZDNet (click for full article)

    Summary: A report from Taiwan states that Google is working on its own house-brand Nexus Chromebook with a touch screen. This, in turn, suggests that it might run a mixture of Android and Chrome OS.


    By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols for Linux and Open Source | November 27, 2012 -- 19:08 GMT (11:08 PST)


    "The next Chromebook might just combine Android and Chrome to make a truly effective tablet/desktop operating system.

    The China Commercial Times (Chinese language link) reports that Google has placed hardware orders with Taiwanese manufacturers Compal Electronics and Wintek to produce a Chromebook with a 12.85-inch touch display. Could this be the start of Google merging Android and Chrome OS?


    Chromebooks are lightweight laptop and desktop devices that use the Chrome Web browser for their primary interface, with Linux on the back end. There's really no reason why they couldn't use Android to support the Chrome interface. Indeed, Chrome is now the default Web browser for Android 4.x and higher.


    While Chromebooks don't get as many headlines as Microsoft Surface and Apple iPads, the devices are quite popular. For example, Samsung's ARM-powered Chromebook is Amazon's top-selling laptop computer, as of November 27th. At the same time, Android now owns 72% of the entire mobile devices market--not just smartphones."
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012

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