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Intel's Cable TV Service And Set Top Box Will Soon Roll Out City By City

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Intel's Cable TV Service And Set Top Box Will Soon Roll Out City By City | TechCrunch (click for full article)

    "Intel is preparing to launch its rumored virtual cable TV service and set top box and has a plan to overcome licensing hurdles. Rather than roll out nationwide, the launch will happen on a city-by-city basis so Intel has more flexibility in negotiating licensing with reluctant content providers, according to a video industry source. The Intel box may also eliminate a core frustration with DVRs.


    A source in the video distribution industry directly familiar with Intel's plans and content dealings tells TechCrunch the semiconductor company is dead serious about getting its chips into the living room. After its effort to convince smart TV manufacturers to use its chips in the initial launch of Google TV failed a few years ago, it's decided to go it alone. The source said that Intel was frustrated with "everyone doing a half-assed Google TV so it's going to do it themselves and do it right."


    The plan is to create a set-top box and subscription TV service that would appeal to people who want streaming TV access but don't want to entirely cut the cable cord and lose key content like sports.


    The service would pipe in both traditional channels and streaming content such as Redbox's streaming service.


    The Wall Street Journal reported Intel's intent to create a pay-TV service in March, and Reuters followed up in June that Intel's box may use facial recognition to power dynamic insertion of ads, improved targeting, and performance measurement. Both noted that the stumbling block to a planned launch by the end of 2012 was an unwillingness on the part of media content providers to unbundle channels or programs and license them to Intel.


    The city-by-city rollout addresses this issue, as content providers may be more willing to experiment with licensing in select markets first where they have looser deals with traditional cable providers. The plan also lets Intel work around holdouts in key markets rather than having to delay a launch entirely. Intel licensed Comcast's Reference Design Kit in October to aid development of its TV services, so it might look to lean on that relationship and operate in Comcast markets.


    With the strategy in place, our source says the rollout will begin "soon" but couldn't be more specific. Perhaps Intel will reveal more details at CES next week.


    One feature we heard about could be a real game changer for the digital video recorder experience. Supposedly Intel's technology could allow people to recall and watch any programming aired in the last month on the channels they subscribe to. That means no worrying about scheduling what to record. You could pull up a new show from last night that friends raved about, a sports game you forgot about, or all the recent reruns of a favorite cartoon.


    We aren't positive this is feasible, but if it is, it could convince people to ditch their current set top box for one with Intel inside and out."
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Why Intel's New IPTV Service Will Do What Google, Apple, and Microsoft Can't - Forbes (click for full article)

    TECH | 12/30/2012 @ 5:24PM

    Kelly Clay, Contributor

    "Apple and Google have been attempting for years to entice customers to ditch cable television for set top boxes that deliver TV shows, movies and more via the internet. For the past year or so, Intel has also quietly been working on a top-secret set-top box that could not only be better than what Apple, Google, and even Microsoft offer today, but also kill the cable industry as we know it.


    This set-top box, said by industry insiders to be available to a limited beta of customers in March, will offer cable channels delivered "over the top" to televisions anywhere there is an Internet connection regardless of provider. (Microsoft Mediaroom, for example, requires AT&T's service, and Xbox has limited offerings for Comcast and FiOS customers). For the first time, consumers will be able to subscribe to content per channel, unlike bundled cable services, and you may also be able to subscribe per show as well. Intel's set-top box will also have access to Intel's already existing app marketplace for apps, casual games, and video on demand. Leveraging the speed of current broadband, and the vast shared resources of the cloud, Intel plans to give customers the ability to use "Cloud DVR", a feature intended to allow users to watch any past TV show at any time, without the need to record it ahead of time, pause live tv, and rewind shows in progress.


    Intel had hoped that GoogleTV and AppleTV would spur demand for Intel chips, but that having failed they poached much of Microsoft's Mediaroom team. Much of the direction of Mediaroom came from the leadership of Jim Baldwin, who is now VP of this Intel initiative.


    At Microsoft, Jim demonstrated that the technology to enable customers to watch TV over the internet using any device was feasible, but content licensing, the goals of ISP's and bandwidth limitations previously stood in the way.


    "In creating Mediaroom, we brought together key emerging technologies to create the world's most modern television system: better video compression, higher access network bandwidth, lower cost single-chip devices, cloud computing; and added to it some great software to make it all work together seamlessly with a great user experience. Our goal was to provide technology to operators that will continue to delight consumers as the world of internet-delivered content unfolds."


    According to an Intel job posting, Jim joined Microsoft in 1997 as a part of the WebTV acquisition, and Jim has been a key architect of digital video technology for various products including the WebTV Plus, Echostar Dishplayer, DirecTV UltimateTV and Microsoft TV."
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Intel Rumored To Release Cable TV Offering - Technology News - redOrbit (click for full article)

    Frustrated With Google, Intel To Release TV Box During CES 2013

    December 31, 2012

    Michael Harper for redOrbit.com


    "TechCrunch reported over the weekend that Intel is readying themselves once more to enter the television market, this time without the help of Google.


    According to the report, Intel has been working on their own subscription-based cable service, but rather than wait till they have all of the kinks worked out of their licensing, they'll be launching on a city-to-city basis. By launching this way, Intel is said to have more flexibility in their negotiations as well as a quicker entrance to key parts of the market.


    Should these tipsters be telling the right story, this new Intel set top box could come with a powerful DVR which would allow users to simply stream any show from any channel they've subscribed to for up to a month after it was first aired. Such a development would mean users wouldn't have to worry about scheduling their DVR to record a show.


    The idea of subscribing to individual channels rather than take on bloated packages is nothing new. Since the Internet became a viable way to stream this kind of content, (think the earliest days of Netflix) many have begun looking at their cable TV subscriptions with disdain, wondering why they should subscribe to hundreds of channels if all they want is local news and sports.


    Intel's new set top box offering - said to be shown off for the first time at CES 2013 next week - will also address this issue, allowing customers to subscribe to channels on an a la cart basis.


    To do this, the company will have to persuade cable providers to split off this content and allow channels to stand on their own rather than be lumped together. It is in this part of the negotiations where taking a city-by-city approach is said to give Intel some flexibility. Rather than hold up their entire launch due to one hold out territory, Intel can release their set top box option in an area whenever they finally work out the licensing deals there.


    Intel has been eager to get into the TV market for some time now. Google's TV was powered by Intel but never managed to take the share of the market that Eric Schmidt had once hoped it would.


    In June, Reuters reported Intel was busy making themselves more attractive to content providers by working on a facial recognition service. This TV Which Watches You is said to know who in the family is watching what TV shows, powerful information for advertisers and content providers alike. This service has its own imposed limits, of course: It can only determine age and gender rather than be able to distinguish between individual members of the family.


    TechCrunch's sources have said Intel is ready to release this new set top box option at CES, noting the company likely felt burned by the poor adoption rate of Google's TV. These sources even went so far to say the company became frustrated with other companies' "half-assed Google TV" attempts that they finally decided to "do it themselves and do it right."


    Intel's alleged new take on a DVR could likely be a major selling point for customers while a major sticking point for content providers. With this option in tow, it might be best for Intel to release in specific areas as they receive clearance. Otherwise, this box may never see the light of day.


    Should Intel decide to unveil such a box at CES 2013, redOrbit will be sure to have all the details as a part of our extensive CES coverage next week."
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm.... This author thinks that the new Intel IPTV boxes will run the Google TV platform. Interesting but I have my doubts about that. We should find out much more from the Consumer Electronics Show that runs from January 8th through January 11th in Las Vegas:

    Intel preparing set top box unveil for CES | Blurb | Geek.com

    From the article:

    "Given Intel's relationship with Google and Android right now, it seems likely that Google TV will play a big part in this service, unless Intel has decided that they would be better off with their own software. Considering the work Intel has put into their line of mobile friendly processors and their current support for Android, it would be much easier for Intel to rely on Google TV to offer much of the background functionality that is needed for a successful set top box of this nature. Whether or not Intel has what it takes to make an attractive Google TV and be able to successfully market it to users is another matter altogether."

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://www.cesweb.org/ (click for the CES web site)
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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  6. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    It looks like a very complicated breech birth at this point and Intel is trying to get it pointed in the right direction before pulling it out and slapping it on the butt to get it breathing. If the baby is named Google TV, I think its chances are much better.
     
  7. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Intel Confirms TV Plans, Won't Exactly Kill Cable Bundles | TIME.com (click for full article)

    By Jared Newman - Feb. 12, 2013

    "Intel says it does have plans to offer its own television service this year, as rumors suggested, but it won't quite be the a la carte alternative that cord cutters have dreamed about.


    Instead, Intel wants to offer "curated" bundles of TV channels, said Erik Huggers, General Manager of Intel Media, at this week's Dive Into Media conference. These bundles would be smaller than the packages that cable and satellite providers offer, and would allow for more customization, according to Reuters, but they won't necessarily be cheaper.


    Intel plans to stream these channels over the Internet, using set-top boxes powered by the company's own processors, and would also make the service available on other devices, such as PCs and tablets. As The Verge reports, Huggers said Intel's devices would have a "beautiful industrial design," and would come equipped with a camera, which could recognize individual users and recommend things to watch. In addition to streaming live television, the device will support DVR-style content, on-demand shows and apps.


    The idea is to have a single streaming device-and a single input on your television-that handles all your viewing needs, rather than just being a supplement like Roku or Apple TV. By combining all kinds of content into one interface, TV providers can start to move away from the traditional grid-like channel guide, and make it easier to find interesting content through recommendations or search.


    Many other companies have tried, or have been trying, to make this happen. Google TV, for instance, pulls in channel listings from your cable box, and indexes those shows alongside other online sources, such as Netflix and Amazon. But Google doesn't actually offer any live television packages on its own, so Google TV can feel a bit like a hack. Microsoft has made a handful of deals to let cable subscribers watch shows on the Xbox 360, but support from TV providers has been limited so far. Apple has reportedly been trying to come up with its own TV service, similar to what Intel is putting together, but its negotiations with Hollywood have been slow-going.


    As the issues with those other companies have shown, software and technology are only one side of the equation. There's also the business side, which involves convincing Hollywood that a new kind of TV service isn't bad for their bottom lines.


    It seems that Intel is the only one to pull it off so far, but at a price: while rumors claimed that Intel wanted to offer a la carte programming, where you only pay for the channels you want, that's no longer the plan. "I don't believe that the industry is ready for a la carte," Huggers said.


    We'll have to wait and see what Intel's curated bundles look like by comparison. Huggers said Intel will launch the service later this year under a new brand sold directly to consumers, but the company hasn't announced a launch date or pricing.


    One other remark from Huggers seems worth mentioning, as reported by The Verge: "Intel is very interested in [having] a direct connection to the consumer," Huggers said. After television, could Intel-made phones and tablets be next on the list?"
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  8. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Intel's TV service will be on mobile devices too, exec says | Mobile - CNET News (click for full article)

    Summary: Erik Huggers, head of Intel's TV business, tells CNET that the company is staying away from the Intel brand with its new service so people don't automatically think of "Intel Inside."


    by Shara Tibken - February 12, 2013 2:46 PM PST


    "*Intel wants to make a TV offering with more capabilities than even the Google TV pictured here.
    (Credit: Google)

    Intel wants to revolutionize the TV industry, and that change won't come just through the chip giant's planned set-top box.
    Erik Huggers, general manager of Intel Media, told CNET today that Intel's new Internet-based TV service also will be available on mobile devices, but he cautioned that it could take some time to expand to multiple platforms. He compared the process to the launch of the BBC's iPlayer video player, a project he oversaw while at that company."
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  9. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Intel testing TV service with employees in three markets | Internet & Media - CNET News (click for full article)

    Summary: Eric Free, vice president and general manager for content and services at Intel Media, also tells CNET he believes 2013 is the year that over-the-top video service really takes off.

    by Shara Tibken March 21, 2013 9:40 AM PDT

    "Intel employees will be the first users to test the company's new TV service, as the semiconductor giant preps for a rollout later this year.Eric Free, vice president and general manager for content and services at Intel Media, told CNET today that Intel is conducting closed trials of its product with Intel employees in three West Coast markets."
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013
  10. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    From the article in my previous post:

    "Intel doesn't plan to significantly cut down a user's cable bill with its new offering, but it expects to attract users by providing more curated content. Free noted that Intel isn't targeting "economic cord cutters," people who drop cable to save money, but is looking to attract younger, tech-savvy users looking for new digital alternatives."

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Meh...... IMO for this Intel service to be a big success it would need to appeal to cost-conscious cord-cutter types. If a cost savings isn't involved - I really don't see this service as anything earth-shattering. But we'll see....
     
  11. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Ha, if it doesn't save money, forget any significant interest by anybody I know. I can tell you from experience, having TiVo and a great cable or satellite package is a whole easier than internet TV, I don't do that anymore because it costs more than I can pay. I am happy as a cord cutter but I have a ton of streaming players, no one box comes close to meeting my needs but Google TV is closest of all of them. I am interested in seeing what Intel ultimately offers but not interested in buying it.
     
  12. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Intel Cooks Up Future of TV -- a Potential Mess for Cable | Media - Advertising Age (click for full article)

    An Unconventional Campaign for an Unconventional Platform

    By: Michael Learmonth Published: April 08, 2013


    "Visualize the TV service you've always wanted: a gorgeous interface that does away with clunky (and often ad-strewn) programming grids; a simple remote that isn't a crushing array of buttons; a cloud-based DVR that doesn't require you to hit "record"; algorithms that learn what you like and recommend new shows; an easy sync with social networks; effortless co-viewing with friends far away; video on tablets, phones and other devices with screens; and the seamless integration of traditional TV and what's on the web.


    Now imagine all of that comes in a beautiful box with a front-facing camera and the kind of industrial design that makes you not want to hide it in a cabinet.


    This device is built. And it is in the hands of a select few secret testers at media companies, agencies and, of course, Intel's Santa Clara, Calif., headquarters.


    About a year ago, Intel established Intel Media to build an "over-the-top" TV service, joining streaming-video players such as Netflix and Hulu. Its service, however, will be the first to deliver a full array of cable TV channels over the internet.


    Intel has not announced a name, a price or a release schedule more specific than some time this year, but those who have seen it describe it as a significant advance over any existing cable or satellite platform. "I'm impressed because Intel makes chips; no one expected them to come out with a product like this," said Michael Bologna, head of advanced TV at Group M, who has spent several hours with the box.


    Silicon Valley has the best interface designers in the world, but until now efforts to apply that expertise to TV have led to false starts like Google TV and products that don't go near far enough, such as Apple TV and Xbox Live. The difference between this and all previous efforts to reinvent cable TV is that Intel has taken the time and spent the money to become a cable operator itself.


    As CEO Erik Huggers told attendees at the All Things D media conference in February, this isn't a service for cord-cutters or anyone who wants a cut-rate cable package. Rather, it's a better cable experience that is designed for (and will be marketed to) the kind of young, affluent and connected consumer who would like a TV service that works as well as their tablet or iPhone.


    Among the many executives Mr. Huggers has hired to build Intel TV is Courtnee Westendorf, a longtime Apple marketing exec who worked on the launches of the iPod and iPhone over the past decade. She is planning a national TV campaign that will not resemble the traditional work from local cable providers.


    "If I asked you about your favorite TV or film, whatever it is there is a flash of an emotion. That is what I want to deliver in the marketing," she said. There will be a new brand, but also a connection to Intel, which is an ingredient brand to consumers -- the "Intel Inside" on a host of PCs, laptops and other devices.


    No one expects Intel to become a TV power overnight. But it represents an interesting challenge for cable and telcos, which as of now do not offer TV service outside their own wired footprint. Each new customer who opts for Intel TV is a customer dumping part of the "bundle" of services that cable and telcos like to sell, including broadband, TV and sometimes phone. Defecting subscribers will be relegating their cable and telco providers to "dumb pipe" status, selling connectivity and bandwidth but not services on top.


    So, how will cable respond? Limiting bandwidth to make internet video services more expensive would draw the ire of the feds. So it's more likely that the cable industry will just follow Intel's lead. Tom Morgan, CEO of Net2TV, one of many startups building web-based video services, believes Intel will open the floodgates and that cable and satellite providers will, too, take their services "over the top" -- meaning you'd be able to get DirecTV, Comcast's Xfinity, Verizon's FiOS or AT&T's U-verse regardless of your broadband provider.


    It may not happen this year, but soon enough, "each will go outside their network and go national," Mr. Morgan predicted. And that will lead to a world that the pay-TV-industry consumers have always wanted: one with true competition."
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  13. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Well nothing is official yet - but the author of this article thinks the Intel TV service could already be kaput:

    MediaPost Publications Intel's TV Distribution Plans Look Cloudy At Best 07/01/2013 (click for full article)

    by David Goetzi - July 1, 2013

    "It looks as if Intel will pull the plug soon on its efforts to create a version of the traditional cable service. There are a number of reasons to do so, but the most immediate may simply be a new CEO wanting to deploy resources elsewhere.

    Brian Krzanich, who took the role in May, seems intent on finding ways for Intel to insert more of its technology into smartphones and tablets. The potential growth there is obviously enormous -- and working with mobile would avoid the tussling with increasingly confident content companies a TV service would require."
     
  14. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Gee whiz, we may have another DOA internet TV device.
     
  15. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm maybe the Intel TV set-top box isn't dead afterall:

    Intel buys Israeli gesture-computing startup Omek while developing set-top box for television - San Jose Mercury News (click for full article)

    by Jeremy C. Owens - July 16, 2013

    "SANTA CLARA -- Intel (INTC) confirmed Tuesday that it has acquired Omek Interactive, an Israeli startup that offers gesture-recognition technology to device manufacturers, technology the Santa Clara company could use for a television set-top box that is in development.

    Intel Israel spokesman Guy Grimland confirmed that the deal has closed in an email Tuesday, declining to specify the price Intel paid; Israeli news source Haaretz reported that the price was close to $50 million."
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
  16. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Scoop: Intel?s upcoming TV service is going to be called OnCue ? Tech News and Analysis (via Mowser)

    by Janko Roettgers - July 12, 2013

    Summary:
    Intel has been secretly preparing to launch its TV service under the OnCue brand, and has registered for related trademarks around the world.


    -- "Intel's TV service, which the company's Intel Media unit plans to launch before the end of the year, is going to be called OnCue, GigaOM has learned. The company has applied for trademarks for OnCue around the globe and tasked ad agency OMD to prepare the official introduction of the brand."
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
  17. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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  18. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    A very detailed informative article about Intel's upcoming TV set-top box:

    Intel Media aims to remake TV with its own technology | OregonLive.com
    (click for full article)

    by Mike Rogoway - Sept. 2, 2013


    Officially, it's one of Intel's most closely held secrets. But hundreds of your Oregon friends and neighbors already have it.


    It's OnCue, a set-top box from a new division and Intel's first consumer product since the dot-com era. As early as this fall, against monumental odds, the company aims to break up cable TV's hold on American households and deliver subscription TV over the Internet.


    The chipmaker has been quietly testing OnCue with more than 1,000 of its Oregon employees this summer and is now expanding the trial to more workers. It hopes for a formal launch in a few cities later this year, provided -- and this is a big caveat -- it can line up programming from cable networks.
     
  19. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Intel delays launch of its OnCue over-the-top TV service. | Digital Trends (click for full article)

    by Caleb Denison - Sept. 30, 2013

    Nobody ever said changing the way people watch TV would be easy, but we've been holding onto hope that Intel and Sony might make breakthroughs later in 2013 with their anticipated Internet-based TV services. Unfortunately, it now appears that the future of television delivery will have to wait until some date...in the future. According to The New York Times, Intel has pushed back the launch date of it's OnCue service into 2014, and word is that Sony is no further along with its own mysterious service. The problem? Licensing deals.


    While it would seem that much of the public is ready for a Pay TV revolution, it appears TV networks are unenthusiastic. According to the Times article, Intel hasn't been able to lock down the licensing deals necessary to offer television shows through a set-top box that would essentially bypass cable and satellite companies. Considering how lucrative the deals networks have with those cable and satellite companies are, this news doesn't come as much of a surprise. So long as climbing on board with an Internet-delivered TV service stands to jeopardize existing revenue streams, Pay TV networks will remain reluctant.


    Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-t...-oncue-over-the-top-tv-service/#ixzz2gh34KxAr
    Follow us: @digitaltrends on Twitter | digitaltrendsftw on Facebook
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2013

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