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HP Stream 14 Inch Notebook Coming Soon For $199

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Aug 18, 2014.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Hmm is this better than a Chromebook?

    HP Stream 14 inch notebook coming soon for $199 - Liliputing (click for full article)

    by Brad Linder - August 18, 2014

    -- A few years ago PC makers seemed to be focused on driving up the prices of portable computers by emphasizing premium devices such as thin, light, and powerful ultrabooks priced around $1000 and up. These days it looks like companies are moving in the other direction by launching laptops that are priced competitively with smartphones and tablets.

    Microsoft and its partners are promising we’ll see a number of laptops priced at $249 or less this fall. One of them is a the new HP Stream Notebook which is expected to sell for just $199.

    HP isn’t taking orders for the laptop yet, but support documents posted to the HP website tell us just about everything there is to know about the HP Stream (other than the launch date and what the assembled laptop looks like).

    The notebook features a 14 inch, 1366 x 768 pixel display, an AMD A4 Micro-6400T “Mullins” processor which is a 4.5W quad-core processor with Radeon R3 graphics, 2GB of RAM, and either 32GB or 64GB of eMMC solid state storage.

    The HP Stream features 802.11b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, HDMI output, and it has an SDXC card reader, 1 USB 3.0 ports, 2 USB 2.0 ports, four speakers with Beats audio, and a 720p webcam.

    HP includes a 32Whr battery and the notebook runs Windows 8.1 software and comes with 100GB of cloud storage for 2 years, courtesy of Microsoft’s OneDrive.

    See more at: HP Stream 14 inch notebook coming soon for $199 - Liliputing
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2014
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Aug 18, 2014
  4. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I like Windows 8.1 touchscreen laptops better than I think I would like a Chromebook but I have never used a Chromebook. I made the decision to stick with Windows laptops based on reading about Chromebooks.

    I would say Microsoft is subsidizing the laptop to the extent of the value of 2 years of cloud storage. I am surprised it is possible to sell a laptop like this for $199 profitably but I can't see any reason HP would sell it at a loss so it must be possible.
     
  5. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I would be concerned this laptop wouldn't run well, using that processor and 2GB RAM. I purchased an inexpensive Windows 8.1 touchscreen laptop for my girlfriend recently, Toshiba C55Dt-A5244, 6GB RAM, modest AMD Quad Core A4-5000 and traditional 500GB HD for $250 refurbished. It does work well now but only time will tell how long it lasts.

    Reviews would be worth waiting for if you think you might want Windows rather than Chrome OS.
     
  6. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    HP Stream revealed: Microsoft's Chromebook killer is a Chromebook clone | PCWorld (click for full article)

    From the article:

    ** Low-end Windows has a checkered history

    The Stream 14 sounds like an interesting device, and with such an aggressive price it will probably sell quite well. But the big question with the Stream 14 will be how well it runs Windows. Low-end PCs are notorious for being deathly slow, although the onboard storage should help the Stream 14 run faster than hard drive-encumbered netbooks from five years ago.

    But if the Stream can't run Windows without stuttering, it will leave users unhappy. Chrome OS, by comparison, was designed to boot quickly. And thanks to the fact that it's little more than the Linux Kernel, a browser, and some drivers, Chrome OS runs very well on low-buck hardware.

    Chromebook also have an advantage over Windows in terms of security thanks to process sandboxing, verified boot checks, and the Web security features built into Chrome itself. You never have to worry about security on a Chromebook—no AV programs needed, no monthly hard drive scans. Windows, although it also does a hardware check at boot, still requires some kind of antivirus and malware protection. Whether you choose the built-in Windows Defender or a third-party solution, you'll still be dealing with at least a small performance hit on an already limited machine, as the AV solution will eat into the Stream's limited RAM and storage, not to mention the potential tax on the low-end AMD processor.

    And when it comes to updates, you can't beat automatic updating on Chromebooks that upgrades your system in the background and never interrupts the user, even at boot. Every time you power on a Chromebook, you're ready to use it in mere seconds. Compare that to Microsoft's Patch Tuesday system that nearly always requires a restart and a few minutes of automated "configuration" after the reboot.

    A Windows desktop does have its advantages over a Chromebook since you can run legacy desktop software, which Chromebooks can't do. But with 32GB of onboard storage in the $200 HP Stream, there's not a ton of room for Windows, third-party software, and any files you want to keep locally instead of in the cloud, such as media files. **
     

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