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Here's What Apple Teaches Employees In Its Ultra-Secretive Internal Training Program

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Aug 14, 2014.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Here's What Apple Teaches Employees In Its Ultra-Secretive Internal Training Program | Business Insider (click for full article)

    by Drake Baer - August 14, 2014, 3:22 AM

    -- The first rule of Apple University is you don’t talk about Apple University.

    The second rule of Apple University is you don’t talk about Apple University.

    Unless, of course, you’re the New York Times, which recently got a glimpse inside the tech giant’s internal training program with the help of unnamed sources. The program is similar to Google’s forward-thinking curriculum, though more secretive and full of fine arts metaphors.

    “(Apple’s internal training program) is highly secretive and rarely written about,” the Times reports. “Apple employees are discouraged from talking about the company in general, and the classes are no exception.”

    But having navigated that web of secrets, here’s what we can tell you about Apple University:

    See more at: Here's What Apple Teaches Employees In Its Ultra-Secretive Internal Training Program | Business Insider
     
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    From the article:

    ** In a course called “What Makes Apple, Apple,” students are shown the remote for Google TV and the remote for Apple TV.

    The Google remote has 78 buttons. The Apple remote has three.

    The difference in product comes from a difference in how teams are run, says course instructor Randy Nelson. As the Times reports:

    How did Apple’s designers decide on three buttons? They started out with an idea, Mr. Nelson explained, and debated until they had just what was needed — a button to play and pause a video, a button to select something to watch, and another to go to the main menu.

    The Google TV remote serves as a counterexample; it had so many buttons, Mr. Nelson said, because the individual engineers and designers who worked on the project all got what they wanted. But, Apple’s designers concluded, only three were needed. **
     
  3. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    The designers were of course wrong. Skip forward and back are essential buttons for certain types of media, and searches are tedious on the ATV due to the lack of decent means to enter text.

    The programmers solved some of these problems by letting users train the ATV to respond to their own IR remote ... basically saying, if our 3 buttons doesn't work for you, supply your own remote.

    Which in fact is what anybody who uses a universal IR remote really wants.
     

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