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Google's YouTube attempts to go premium

Discussion in 'More News from Your Google TV News Team' started by Rickaren, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Google's YouTube attempts to go premium

    By Larry Dignan | April 6, 2011


    Google is reportedly plotting a YouTube overhaul that would focus on premium channels and professional programming.


    The move, reported by the Wall Street Journal, revolves around creating roughly 20 premium channels that would have five to 10 hours of original programming.


    And the real kicker: Google is ready to spend $100 million to create original content.

    Netflix has already gone down the path of original content.


    The difference between Google and Netflix, however, is know-how. Netflix knows Hollywood as a partner. Google is partner and foe and if you had to pick one it would probably be the latter. The other issue to ponder is whether Google and the emphasis on putting engineers first under CEO Larry Page will really equate to programming success. After all, the left brain-right brain divide is pretty vast.



    However, Google’s revamp of YouTube would make it more aligned with the nascent* Google TV effort.

    SOURCE


    *If you did not know the word nascent, I looked it up since I didn't.


     
  2. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    YouTube Is The Real “Google TV”

    Apr 7, 2011
    Greg Sterling

    [​IMG]

    Google TV, the company’s much-hyped “Connected TV” effort that brought together Sony, Logitech and Dish Networks, has failed to deliver — at least so far. While sales figures haven’t been released the public isn’t biting, it would appear.

    Google TV (the product) may ultimately join the ranks of Google Wave as an ambitious failure. However it’s still a bit premature to call it that.

    Regardless the news yesterday that YouTube is planning to spend $100 million or more on new and original content and that it will lease almost 14,000 square feet of new office spacein Beverly Hills got me thinking: YouTube is the “real Google TV.”

    Eventually (say within three to five years) the majority of US TV screens will connect to the internet. Most Americans will probably not own Google TVs. However they will be able to access Google content through their TV sets. And the primary source of that content could be YouTube, which is seeking to redefine itself as a source of premium entertainment, as well as the familiar “viral videos” and clips.

    Although it has struggled to build a library of professional content, the new spending, redesign and “channel strategy” and professional content push seeks to change that.

    Depending on how committed Google is to professionally produced content, YouTube might ultimately be able to challenge Hulu and Netflix as a distributor of programming and movies.

    YouTube could become a major distributor of TV and movies, especially independent films. And in the coming “Connected TV era” Netflix, Hulu and, maybe, YouTube are the new CBS, NBC and ABC — or the new TimeWarner and Comcast, if you prefer.

     
  3. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Americans Still Watch A Ridiculous Amount Of TV

    Dan Frommer
    [​IMG]

    Thursday, April 7, 2011

    Despite the rise of Netflix streaming, iPads, mobile apps, and Facebook, plain-old TV viewing is still an incredibly popular activity -- and the number of hours that Americans spend in front of the boob tube each month is still growing.

    Americans watched TV for an average 154 hours and 5 minutes during Q4 of 2010, Nielsen estimates, up slightly from the same period in 2009. That's more than 5 hours per day, on average.


    Netflix streaming leads the pack among online services. Those who watched video online in February spent an average 9 hours and 16 minutes streaming from Netflix, according to Nielsen. But that's still less than 10% of monthly "TV time."


    Meanwhile, YouTube -- still the most popular video site by unique viewers and number of streams -- only kept people tuned in for an average 2 hours and 14 minutes in February. That is precisely why Google is reportedly going to spend up to $100 million financing original content for YouTube, in an effort to get people to spend more time on the site.

     

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