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Google TV just got a huge shot in the arm

Discussion in 'More News from Your Google TV News Team' started by Rickaren, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    With Motorola, Google TV just got a huge shot in the arm

    Aug. 15, 2011



    [​IMG]Google's acquisition of Motorola isn't just about the Android mobile market. In addition to giving Google some mobile hardware capabilities and patent coverage, the purchase could also be a big boost to Google TV. But to make that happen, Google TV will need to shift its positioning from an operating system that is sold to consumers to one that will be used by a number of pay TV operators instead.

    Google TV has been a flop

    Introduced to much fanfare last year, the first generation of Google TV products have largely underwhelmed consumers. Logitech, which invested heavily in the OS with its Google TV Revue set-top boxes, has taken a huge hit from the lack of interest in the product. It recently slashed the price of the Revue boxes, from $249 to $99. Sony has also heavily discounted its first generation of Google TV products, slashing the price of its entry-level 24" Google TV product in half.


    Continue Reading @ SOURCE
     
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    The article states: "the purchase could also be a big boost to Google TV. But to make that happen, Google TV will need to shift its positioning from an operating system that is sold to consumers to one that will be used by a number of pay TV operators instead".

    I for one hope this isn't a path that Google takes. I am not a big fan of Comcast. I would rather just purchase my Google TV device at Best Buy, Amazon, or wherever - as opposed to being required to rent a cable box from Comcast. Comcast has not been very Google TV friendly thus far - so I wouldn't even bet that they will use Motorola boxes with Google TV built in.
     
  3. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    This will be good if it causes Google TV to catch on and the standalone boxes like the Revue benefit as a result. I bought the Revue to avoid a cable bill. If Motorola cable boxes with Google TV are a hit and developers create new applications that can be installed on existing Google TV boxes, that should be a positive. I am not sure what is going to happen and whether or not the Motorola acquisition will benefit Google TV users or not but it is clear something needs to happen to give Google TV some momentum. I love the product as it is and the upcoming improvements should make it better but I am not seeing widespread approval at the various forums, in fact, just the opposite so far.
     
  4. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    You can rest assure that if the channel line providers were to adopt Google TV into their set-top boxes then those boxes would be more locked down than it currently is. Remember its an open-platform, so there would be nothing to prevent them from curating the "Google TV" experience as they deem fit.
     
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Yes I agree and "curating the Google TV experience as they deem fit" could also entail demands (from the cable TV operators) that the Google TV version for consumers be severely locked down or even shut down. Comcast could tell Google something like this "if you want us to use your set-top box we want guarantees that third-party Google TV devices for consumers (Logitech, Sony devices) won't infringe upon our business model". Or "if you want us to utilize your set-top box you must discontinue third party Google TV devices to the consumer". So how would this be beneficial for Google TV? I don't trust Comcast.
     
  6. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    How Google's Acquisition Of Motorola Mobility Affects You [​IMG]
    8/15/11





    Now that Google has announced its intention to buy Motorola Mobility -- forming a Frankenstein that shall be named either Googorola or Motoroogle, depending upon your preference -- what does this mean for you? How will this marriage of Google and Motorola affect the end user?


    HTC-You Later?


    Android is an open platform, which means that the code is available to all developers and is not only limited to one manufacturer's handsets. The operating system appears not only on Motorola's phones, but also on handsets made by Samsung, Sony Ericsson, LG, HTC, and others. Now that Google owns a phone manufacturer, can those companies (and phone-buyers who prefer non-Motorola handsets) kiss the Google OS goodbye?


    Apparently not. In a blog post explaining the acquisition, Google CEO Larry Page went out of his way to assure users (and perhaps the heads of the handset makers above) that Motorola phones will not become the exclusive carriers of their operating system. The key paragraph:
    This acquisition will not change our commitment to run Android as an open platform. Motorola will remain a licensee of Android and Android will remain open. We will run Motorola as a separate business. Many hardware partners have contributed to Android’s success and we look forward to continuing to work with all of them to deliver outstanding user experiences.

    Meaning: Please don't be mad at us, HTC and Samsung. We still love you, too.

    Page wants Droid devotees to know that this acquisition will not limit Android to Motorola handsets, which have been much less popular among buyers than their HTC and Samsung counterparts. He also has to reassure the makers of Samsung and HTC that they are still valued: Those two companies are the top two movers of Android phones, making up over 50 percent of the Android handset market, according to a July 31 report by ABI research. So, chances are if you have an Android phone, it will continue to operate on the Android operating system; that is, unless Samsung, HTC or Sony ceases to license Google's mobile software.

    Which it appears that they won't.


    Defense! (CLAP CLAP CLAP!) Defense! (CLAP CLAP CLAP!)



    Kevin Tofel of tech blog GigaOM wonders if Android-using handset makers will "buy" Google's explanation that it is still committed to the openness of its operating system, stating that there is now "constant potential for an Android partner to question if Motorola is getting some type of special treatment." Obviously, this could harm the relationship Google has with the non-Motorola phone manufacturers (HTC, Samsung, etc.) that carry its software.


    The public reactions to the deal indicate that these phone makers are uniform in their support. Google (and mostnewssources covering the deal) have framed the acquisition as being totally about patents, enabling the company to defend itself against patent lawsuits from Microsoft and Apple. HTC, Samsung, and Sony are (at least publicly) totally on board.


    The word of the day, children, is "defense," according to Google's roundup of quotes from partners praising the Motorola deal:
    “We welcome today’s news, which demonstrates Google’s deep commitment to defending Android, its partners, and the ecosystem.” - Peter Shin, President of Samsung Mobile “I welcome Google‘s commitment to defending Android and its partners.” - Bert Nordberg, President & CEO, Sony Ericsson
    “We welcome the news of today‘s acquisition, which demonstrates that Google is deeply committed to defending Android, its partners, and the entire ecosystem.” - Peter Chou, HTC
    “We welcome Google‘s commitment to defending Android and its partners.” - Jong-Seok Park, President & CEO, LG Electronics

    Motorola holds a ton of mobile patents; in fact, it manufactured the first ever commercial mobile cellphone. Handset makers that rely on Android can breathe a sigh of relief now that Google has a stockpile of patents to defend itself against mounting lawsuits (which have already blocked at least one Google-running device, the Samsung Galaxy tablet, in Europe).


    The acquisition may mean beefed-up legal protection for the Android operating system, and better options for Android consumers, but one question remains for phone manufacturers like HTC and Samsung who are running the Google OS:


    Really, How Can They Be Happy With This?



    Steve Kovach, who covers Google at Business Insider, said during a phone interview that companies like HTC and Samsung are likely "playing it down right now." Internally, however, they must know Motorola is going to receive preferential treatment from Google, Kovach surmised.

    "It's very likely Google is going to be working directly with Motorola," he said, "Motorola is now likely to get the Nexus devices first, the Nexus tablet, whenever a new Google software update comes out, they'll get it first ... Why would they [Google] give it to any other company? They own Motorola now. It hurts their bottom line."


    Google already gives oddly, some might say "unpredictably," preferential treatment to its hardware makers. It gave HTC the first crack at its flagship Google Nexus One phone in January 2010; in March 2010, it turned around and gave the next generation of Google Nexus phones to Samsung. In early 2011, Google made Motorola's Xoom the first tablet to run on its new Honeycomb OS, and then withheld the source code from other developers, even though it helped form and is part of an alliance that is sworn to code openness.


    Expect Motorola to be at the head of the line for all the latest and most cutting edge in Google mobile software. Though Google can claim that it will be fair in keeping Android OS open, why wouldn't it make Motorola devices its flagship? Google is now making money from Motorola's success, and so it has incentive to make sure that Motorola's phones are the most attractive options for Android users.
    Andy Rubin, the Google senior VP of Mobile, has said that the process by which the maker of the Google Nexus phone is chosen will remain the same, and that Motorola will not necessarily become the maker of the Nexus. Kovach said he doesn't buy it, though. Look for Motorola to be the primary benefactors and recipients of Google software updates and Nexus phone decisions in the future, he said.



    Google TV, Coming To A Cable Box Near You?



    Though most analysis of this deal and what it means for consumers has focused on cellphones and the Android operating system, Kovach said that it may also affect your cable box.

    The Google blog post announcing the deal mentioned that "Motorola is also a market leader in the home devices and video solutions business." Kovach said he sees a huge opportunity for the struggling Google TV to increase its penetration into American households.


    "Motorola makes cable boxes for Time Warner and many other cable companies as well ... This is a big opportunity for Google to essentially force Google TV into your living room and [for] the software to come pre-loaded on your cable boxes," he said.


    To say that Google TV is not doing well is an understatement. Logitech recently cut its price of Google TV boxes from $259 to $99 due to poor sales; there were more returns of Google TVs than there were units sold in Q1 of 2011 for Logitech.


    Though Kovach emphasized that this was "pure speculation" on his part, it would make sense for Google to take advantage of Motorola's cable box operation and pre-install its flagging Google TV software on some or all of its new acquisition's ubiquitous TV hardware.


    What Is A "Supercharged Android"?



    In a blog post explaining the acquisition, Google CEO Larry Page twice said that the deal would "supercharge Android" -- once in the title, and once in the body of the post. It's an exciting turn of phrase, and everyone likes supercharged things, but what does it actually mean?


    "The reason why the iPhone is such a great device is that the person who makes the iPhone also makes the software," Kovach said. Google now, for the first time, will be working to engineer software optimized for a cellphone, which the company hopes will mean a distinctive mobile device that can rival the iPhone. "When you have control over the hardware and the software, you have a better device."


    Though Android leads the way in U.S. market share among smartphone operating systems, a recent survey by investment bank Piper Jaffray showed that iPhone users have a 94 percent retention rate compared to Android users' retention rate of 47 percent. Though the sample size was small in the survey, the numbers were striking: The Android OS has no brand loyalty compared to Apple's iPhone.
    Google might be hoping that working more directly with a phone manufacturer will change that; how directly they utilize their new acquisition to produce a "supercharged Android" could determine whether they are really able to make a single device as dominant and attractive as Apple's iPhone.

    SOURCE
     
  7. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    How Motorola Buyout May Help Save Google TV

    The news today that Google have brought Motorola is seen by many as a further developmant of the Android mobile platform. But the whopping $12.5 billion deal may also give the ailing Google TV platform a shot in the arm too.

    [​IMG]Motorola could save Google TV



    The aquisition now makes Google a set-top box maker, one of the largest in the world. And now becomes an important cog in the cable TV industry. This now means Google TV could be built into a bunch of set-top boxes. In fact some analysts believe Google wants Motorola for boxes rather than mobile phones and tablet devices.


    The Google TV platform has not taken off since launch with Logitech slashing their Google TV Revue price and Sony following suite with their Google TV television sets being heavily discounted.


    Another problem for Google is convincing developers to develop Android applications for TV sets with so many few sold, and the abundance of other TV operating systems on the market to develop for.
    This aquisition could change all of that if the boxes used by cable companies such as Verizon have a Google TV OS. They could quickly have a big user base for developers to build apps for a guaranteed successfull system.


    More on this story:-

    Motorola could help cure ailing Google TV – CNET (blog)
    But the acquisition also means that Google is now one of the worlds biggest set-top box makers and therefore now part of the cable industrys distribution chain. Shudder. Nonetheless this is a chance for Google to push the hobbling Google TV …

    Google TV just got a huge shot in the arm – GigaOm
    … to have their live TV and video on-demand services alongside applications like Netflix or Hulu Plus. Then again before the iPhone and Android took over no one thought the mobile operators would embrace an open app ecosystem on mobile handsets either…

    Motorola + Sprint = Google’s AT&T, Verizon and Comcast Killer – Forbes
    Such an offering would destroy the fiction that internet cellular and cable TV are separate overlapping industries. In reality they are now all just applications riding on top of the same platform. It is just that innovation has been slowed because …



    Read more internet tv news: How Motorola Buyout May Help Save Google TV How Motorola Buyout May Help Save Google TV
     
  8. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Google's $12.5 Billion Motorola Acquisition Includes Horsham Plant

    Motorola is a major manufacturer of Google's Android smartphone systems.


    [​IMG]







    According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, Google's $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility includes the cell phone maker's Horsham video equipment factory.


    The Horsham plant, Motorola Home, nets about one-third of the company's annual sales, according to the article. In all, Illinois-based Motorola employs 20,000 workers at its factories.


    The Horsham site became part of Motorola when it took over the former General Instruments, a descendant of Jerrold Electronics, the post WWII cable TV equipment and finance business founded by Milton Jerrold Shapp.


    SOURCE
     
  9. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Google may alienate allies with Motorola deal

    Google and Motorola Mobility will make for awkward dance partners to a room full of jilted companies uncomfortably eyeing the pair.


    [​IMG] Remember the Nexus One? That was supposed to be the end of Google's aspirations to get into the handset business. But not anymore.


    While Google's move to acquire Motorola for $12.5 billion is largely motivated by the need for more intellectual property, what's been largely left unsaid is how the Internet giant will juggle the duo roles of principal architect of the Android software and now a competitor to its vendor partners.


    Google said Motorola will continue to run as a separate unit. Which begs the question: will handset manufacturers such as Samsung Electronics and HTC start viewing Google as a competitive threat?

    "Any way (Google) tries to couch this, there's no doubt Motorola is the most favored player," said Michael Gartenberg, an analyst for Gartner. "If I'm a third-party vendor, I have some real concerns here."
    Google is backtracking from its vow not to get into the handset business, a concern initially sparked when it began selling the Nexus One directly to consumers through its Web site early last year. At the time, Google said it wasn't interested in competing with its partners.


    Now, a Motorola with Google's backing already adds a new potent competitive threat to a field that is already crowded. Despite Google's attempts to create a more consistent experience, analysts believe the vendors will begin to differentiate even more and rely less on the stock Android platform.


    "If, for example, Google provides preferential access to the Android code to its own hardware division, this would place other vendors at a disadvantage and may lead them to question their commitment to the platform," said Nick Dillon, an analyst at Ovum.


    For now, everyone is playing nice. Google Chief Executive Larry Page reiterated his company's stance on maintaining an open ecosystem. The Mountain View, Calif., Internet giant even has a page featuring praise from some of its largest Android vendors.

    "We welcome the news of today's acquisition, which demonstrates that Google is deeply committed to defending Android, its partners, and the entire ecosystem," HTC Chief Executive Peter Chou said on the site, echoing a sentiment shared by Samsung, LG, and Sony Ericsson.


    Gartenberg said the comments were "damned with faint praise."
    The comments were all in reference to the expected patent protection Google will be able to provide for the deal. Conspicuous in its absence were any of the company's thoughts on the new competitive dynamics.


    Samsung declined to provide further comment on the prospect of competing against Google. Representatives from the other handset vendors weren't immediately available to comment.
    Microsoft, meanwhile, took the chance to talk up its own independent status.
    "Investing in a broad and truly open mobile ecosystem is important for the industry and consumers alike, and Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners," said Andy Lees, president of the Windows Phone division.


    Andy Rubin, head of Google's mobile operations, noted that the Nexus project, which began with the Nexus One by HTC and followed by the Nexus S from Samsung, will continue to be open to the various handset partners.


    The Nexus program was always meant to be a platform to show off the latest and greatest features on Android. The Nexus S, for example, was the first Android phone to run on the Gingerbread version and also featured a near-field communications chip to run Google Wallet and mobile transactions.
    But with Motorola in the fold, many expect it to get the latest software and features coming out of Android. With Google looking to crack down a bit on fragmentation, Motorola will likely focus on stock Android devices in the future, and likely downplay its use of Motoblur, analysts said.

    That, in turn, may force the other Android vendors to push further with their efforts to further differentiate their phones.


    The vendors may even take a second look at critical Android applications that promote Google service, such as Android Market and even the browser, which has its default search set to Google.
    "(The other vendors) will have to work harder to differentiate," Gartenberg said. "You have to double down on customization."


    Just as Microsoft's deal to closely align with Nokia caused some ripples with the other vendors, Google's deal with Motorola may force them to take another look at the Windows Phone platform.
    "It puts the vendors between a rock and a hard place," Gartenberg said.

     
  10. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Google-Motorola likely to draw regulatory scrutiny

    Google's plan to acquire Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion promises to trigger antitrust red flags just as much as it will shake up the mobile-handset business.


    As the dominant leader in Internet search and search advertising, Google can't make an acquisition without raising regulatory hackles. And this deal, based on its size alone, will spark trustbuster scrutiny.


    "We're quite confident that this will be approved," Google's chief legal officer, David Drummond, said during a conference call announcing the news today. "We believe, very strongly, that this is a pro-competitive transaction."
    [​IMG] Google's David Drummond



    Google is already facing an antitrust investigation from the Federal Trade Commission. In June, the company disclosed that it received "formal notification" from the agency that it was reviewing the company's business. And last week, The Wall Street Journal reported that the FTC was including the Android mobile operating system in that probe, looking into whether Google is barring smartphone makers that load Android on their devices from using competitors' services.


    In looking at the Motorola deal, regulators will most certainly zoom in on Google's industry-leading Android. The question they'll try to answer is whether the Motorola acquisition benefits Android in a way that could increase Google's market power in search and search advertising.
    It's an issue that Drummond sought to address right away.


    "Android has clearly added competition, innovation, increased user choice," Drummond said on the call. "We think protecting that ecosystem is pro-competitive, almost by definition."
    Competitors, though, are likely to see things differently. For now, Google's biggest rivals, Apple and Microsoft have declined to comment on the antitrust implications of the deal. But it's almost certain that they'll raise concerns with regulators.


    "One way to look at this is, how is Microsoft going to complain? How is Apple going to complain?" says Eleanor Fox, an antitrust professor at New York University School of Law. "What are they going to want?"


    Most likely, those companies will focus on the very same things that Google did as it considered buying Motorola-- its vast patent portfolio. Motorola Chief Executive Sanjay Jha noted on the conference call that the company has some 17,000 patents and another 7,500 patent applications pending.


    Though not all of those are related to mobile devices, those patents will go a long way toward helping Google defend itself and its handset partners from lawsuits alleging that Android has infringed on patents. That's because patent litigation often plays out like a kabuki dance where one company with a patent threatens to sue another company that it believes has infringed on its innovation. The accused company often resorts to asserting it's own patents against its accuser. That leads to negotiations and cross-licensing deals.


    But Google has been at a disadvantage in the game because it has a thin patent portfolio for mobile devices. That's why it's been sued by Oracle and its handset partners have been sued by Microsoft and Apple. And it's why Google was so desperate to buy Motorola, offering 63 percent more than Motorola's Friday closing price on the New York Stock Exchange.


    So expect Apple, Microsoft, and others to raise concerns of anticompetitiveness over the deal to convince regulators to push a consent decree that would diminish the value of those patents. Google's rivals would love nothing more than to have regulators force the company to have to either divest or cross-license some of the Motorola patents. It won't be easy though.
    "In order to have a consent decree, they are going to have to find an anticompetitive angle," Fox said. That's not easy in a so-called vertical acquisition, when one company acquires a customer or supplier, as opposed to buying a rival in a horizontal deal that would eliminate competition. Vertical acquisitions, such as the proposed Google-Motorola deal, tend to be viewed more leniently.
    "Because Google has got real enemies some people will try to make noise about the deal," said Ed Black, president of the Computer and Communications Industry Association in Washington, D.C., a trade group that counts Google as well as Microsoft as members. "But from a regulatory standpoint they don't compete horizontally."


    In general, federal agencies reviewing proposed acquisitions look at whether the deal will cause adverse competitive effects and whether it will create economic efficiencies that would otherwise not occur, Rick Brunell, director of legal advocacy at the American Antitrust Institute, said. Regulators will also look at whether either party will leave the market if the merger doesn't happen.


    Motorola may not exactly be prepared to stop making cell phones, but its market share has plummeted since the success of the Razr half a decade ago. A June article in Fortune magazine called the company "an also-ran in global market share by units and by revenue." A report from market research firm Trefis, which bases its estimates on product desirability and revenue, said Motorola's mobile-phone market share will fall below 3 percent by 2017.


    A federal requirement called the Hart-Scott-Rodino process requires companies to notify the FTC and the Justice Department in deals of this size. That also established a mandatory waiting period that must be met before the transaction can be completed.


    One important signal is whether whichever agency reviews this transaction makes a supplemental request, which would indicate a willingness to scrutinize the deal more closely. A so-called second request can include extensive requests for documents and delay the process by months.

     
  11. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Monday, August 15, 2011

    Motorola purchase may bolster Google TV in bid to unseat Apple TV



    Published: 04:30 PM EST

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Executives for both Motorola and Google made clear on Monday that they intend to take advantage of Motorola's existing presence in the high-definition set-top box space, where the Google TV has failed to gain traction against the Apple TV.

    Motorola Mobility's primary business is in creating smartphones, which it will continue to do under Google's ownership. And the search company will also control the more than 17,000 patents owned by Motorola.

    But as part of the
    $12.5 billion acquisition announced on Monday, Google will also gain access to products and devices from Motorola that extend well beyond the mobile phone business. One key element of the deal, acknowledged by executives during a conference call, is Motorola's set-top box business, where the company builds high-definition digital video recorders and other devices.

    Motorola's "Video Solutions" line of products also offer sharing of content. One product under that umbrella, "Televation," allows users to rebroadcast live TV to other devices in their home. In addition, Motorola also builds and sells "SURFboard" branded cable modems, Voice over IP telephony adapters, and other hardware.

    "They're a leading home device maker, and that's also a big opportunity," Google CEO Larry Page said of Motorola on Monday. "We're working with them in the industry to really accelerate innovation."

    Motorola's chief executive, Sanjay Jha, discussed a "great convergence" he sees happening in technology, where the mobile world, with devices like smartphones and tablets, is merging with set-top boxes, allowing users to seamlessly share content between devices.

    Jha highlighted the "close relationship" that Motorola has established with carriers and cable providers as a potential asset Google might be able to leverage through its acquisition. He said together, Google and Motorola will be able to "accelerate convergence" in the market.

    Executives made no specific mention of the
    struggling Google TV platform, but Motorola's existing presence in the set-top box market is a clear asset as Google attempts to enter the space. And their comments made clear that Motorola's TV-based hardware and established relationships with cable providers were a selling point in the multi-billion-dollar deal.

    While the first generation of Google TV faltered, Apple has found moderate success, selling roughly a half-million units per quarter. But executives at Apple have famously referred to the Apple TV as a "hobby," because it is not in the same caliber of product as the iPhone, iPad, Mac or iPod.

    Of course, Apple is already pushing the "convergence" touted by Google and Motorola executives with its own
    AirPlay technology, release late last year with iOS 4.2. The new Apple TV, powered by the same iOS mobile operating system as the iPhone and iPad, can receive audio and even high-definition video wirelessly from Apple's mobile devices, allowing content to be shown on the big screen.

    SOURCE
     
  12. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    You know what, this is getting ridiculous. Apple TV isn't really isn't much more than an iTunes accessory. Google already has the means to converge the mobile and television platform. All they need to do is increase the DNLA compliance to be a valid "Push-To" client and open up the Android Market. If this was truly really important to them then they would...

    INVEST THEIR FSCKING RESOURCES IN DEVELOPING GOOGLE TV AND FINALLY DELIVER ON THE PROMISES THEY FSCKING MADE LAST YEAR!!!! :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2011
  13. Cygnus

    Cygnus New Member

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    So tell us how you really feel... :D Hopefully with the big bux spent on moto, google is finally serious about GTV. It could finally become their killer app...

     
  14. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Feds likely to let Google buy Motorola Mobility Federal regulators likely to let Google buy Motorola Mobility, despite bigger antitrust probe

    [​IMG] In this May 11, 2011 file photo, attendees chat at the Google IO Developers Conference in San Francisco. Google is buying cell phone maker Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc., for $12.5 billion in cash Monday, Aug. 15, 2011, in what is by far the company's biggest acquisition to date.


    Monday August 15, 2011, 6:11 pm EDT



    WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal regulators are unlikely to block Google Inc. from buying cellphone maker Motorola Mobility since the acquisition could help drive competition in the fast growing mobile device market.


    But the deal comes as Google faces scrutiny in the U.S. and overseas from antitrust regulators concerned that the Web search giant may be abusing its clout as a major gateway to the Internet to muscle its way into new businesses and stifling competition in the process. In response to complaints by rivals, the Federal Trade Commission is ramping up a broad inquiry into possible anticompetitive behavior by Google. The European Commission, the Texas attorney general and the Senate Judiciary Committee are also investigating the company.


    Google's plan to buy Motorola Mobility for roughly $12.5 billion marks the latest in a string of high-profile acquisitions as the company expands beyond its core online search business. Google is seeking to buy the device maker, which uses its Android operating system, at a time when more and more people are going online using mobile devices rather than desktop computers, and finding what they want online through apps rather than search engines.


    Devices such as smartphones and tablet computers running Google's Android operating system are battling Apple's wildly popular iPhone and iPad, Research in Motion's BlackBerry and mobile devices using Microsoft operating systems for consumers' dollars. Android is considered to be "open" software, meaning that Google gives it to device makers free of charge and allows them to modify it for their products in whatever way they see fit.


    The Motorola deal will be reviewed by the either the Justice Department or the FTC to determine whether the combined company could hurt competition in the mobile computing market. For antitrust regulators, the biggest concern is that once Google owns a device manufacturer, it will be in direct competition with other smartphone and tablet computer makers that also use the Android operating system, explained John Mayo, a professor at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business.
    Google has pledged to operate Motorola Mobility and Android as separate businesses. But Mayo said the acquisition could give Google an incentive to provide Motorola with exclusive access to its latest innovations and newest Android features, and even to withhold software upgrades from rival device makers.


    Still, four other big device makers that also use Android -- Samsung, Sony Ericsson, HTC Corp. and LG Electronics -- have all said they support the deal. That's because the Motorola acquisition gives Google a portfolio of more than 17,000 patents on phone technology that can be used to defend Android device makers from patent infringement litigation.
    That support signals that other device makers believe Google wants to protect and grow its Android business -- and see Android used on as many mobile devices as possible -- rather than restrict access to the platform, said Ed Black, president and chief executive of the Computer & Communications Industry Association.


    If anything, antitrust regulators may see the deal as a boost to competition. Android is such a crucial competitor to the iPhone in particular, that allowing Google to buy Motorola Mobility will likely produce even more innovation in smartphones and other devices, said David Balto, a former FTC antitrust official who is now a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.

    Perhaps the biggest question is whether the Motorola Mobility deal could affect the broader Google antitrust inquiry recently launched by the FTC. That probe will focus on whether Google, which handles two out of every three online searches in the U.S., abuses that control by placing links to its own content and services at the top of search results and burying links to rivals. Google's search results already highlight some of its own specialized services, including online mapping, video and finance.
    Although search rankings raise a very different set of issues than the proposed Motorola Mobility acquisition, the FTC inquiry is still in its early stages and could yet delve into many other parts of Google's business, including Android. Among other things, the investigation could look at whether Google restricts the use of rival services on Android devices.


    Against that backdrop, Google's decision to buy Motorola Mobility is a "gutsy move," said Melissa Maxman, an antitrust attorney with Cozen O'Connor. Google, she said, "is doubling down."
    Still, Maxman said, the acquisition could reveal a different side of Google to the FTC. That's because the agency will focus on whether the company is leveraging existing monopolies in markets such as Internet search to extend its dominance into new businesses. The Motorola Mobility acquisition, she said, does not fit that pattern.


    Given the dominant position of Apple and other device makers in the handset market, Maxman added, the Motorola deal serves as a reminder that "Google doesn't control everything."
    SOURCE
     
  15. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    O.K. Everyone has one! (view that is) Here is another view of the latest Google purchase. I'm here to report to our members what is out there and I don't write this stuff myself. What do you think about this Article?



    THE VERDICT: Google-Motorola Will Be A Colossal Disaster*

    Having had 24 hours to digest the Google-Motorola deal, we're ready to deliver a verdict: Unless Google quickly sells off Motorola's hardware businesses, the deal will be a colossal disaster.



    Here's why...

    • Google is a massive global software company with huge profit margins, genius engineers, extraordinarily high pay scales, and a near-monopoly on the most amazing advertising business the world has ever seen.
    • Motorola is a has-been, low-margin, global hardware-manufacturing business that operates at break-even, has 19,000 employees--19,000! Motorola, in other words, is a VAST company, one that will increase the size of Google by a staggering 60+%. Mergers of this size rarely work well (or smoothly), even when managed by companies that are very experienced at making huge acquisitions (which Google isn't).
    • Motorola does not have dominant share of the key businesses Google is buying: smartphones, tablets, and TV gadgets. This means is does not have the weight necessary to push anyone around. For example, Motorola only has a small slice of market share (10%) in its key business (smart-phones). It's nowhere in tablets. The only way to make decent money in the hardware business is to have real leverage, and Motorola doesn't have it.
    • The only thing that Google and Motorola have in common is that they are loosely considered "technology" businesses. This is not enough commonality for a massive merger like this to be a success without heroic integration efforts. (Think AOL-Time Warner).
    • Google has no idea how to run a global hardware manufacturing business. (This is not a knock on the folks at Google, and it does not mean the folks at Google are stupid. It just means they don't know how to run a global hardware manufacturing business.)
    • The global hardware manufacturing business is so brutally tough that even companies that know how to run global hardware manufacturing businesses don't do it very well--Exhibit A: Motorola.
    • Motorola is way too big to serve as just a laboratory for Google's phone, tablet, and set-top box ambitions. If Google wanted a lab for those things, it should have set up a single factory somewhere and started cranking them out.
    • Merely "operating Motorola as a stand-alone business" will soak up considerable Google management time and attention. The good people at Motorola, the ones who are now selling their stock to Google at a 70% premium, will either need to be paid huge dollars to stay or will leave for more exciting opportunities than being an ugly stepchild division of a gleaming global software company.
    • Successfully integrating Motorola--and making the merger work--would require a world-class integration team, along the lines of the ones GE's Jack Welch used to run. The m.o. of the GE integration team was to completely gut the acquired companies and replace them with GE managers, thus quickly "GE-izing" the acquired companies. This type of integration for Motorola would involve firing thousands of people, shutting down factories, re-organizing global supply chains, killing products, parachuting in trusted Googlers, and so forth. Who at Google is going to do that?
    In short, the most likely scenario here is that Motorola's business will begin to deteriorate quickly--if not now, the moment Motorola management takes their eyes off the ball. As long as they can get the deal closed, Motorola management will get their big payday, and some of them may even get it beforehand (if they're allowed to sell the stock that has popped on Google's bid). After that, they'll have little incentive to knock the cover off the ball.
    Even if Google runs Motorola as a stand-alone business, they will have to find a true genius to run it--and as evidenced by the struggles of many other global hardware manufacturing businesses, these folks are in short supply. And this genius will have a ton of work to do just to get Motorola running smoothly and "Google-ized" before he or she can even begin to fiddle around with Google's cool new product ideas. This work will involve vast layoffs and restructurings. It will also take time.



    If Google is not very successful at this integration, Motorola's business will quickly deteriorate and begin to drag on Google's financials. Google's financials are extremely strong, so investors may well overlook this for a while. But they won't overlook it forever. And as they begin to ***** about their once-gleaming software yacht suddenly being dragged down by a global hardware manufacturing anchor, the Motorola "distraction" will grow.
    And, eventually, it's not inconceivable that it will end up the same way the disastrous
    AOLTime Warner merger did: With a quiet spin-off after years' worth of value destruction.
    But maybe Google CEO
    Larry Page foresees all that--and plans to spin off Motorola's hardware business the instant he gets the deal approved.
    We can only hope.
    But as we're hoping, we should bear in mind that
    Larry Page has long been vocal about the idea that Google will have to make massive game-changing bets if it wants to stay on top.
    A couple of years ago, Larry's big-game-changing obsession seized on green energy, and this led to Google plunging into the wind-farm business.
    More recently, it locked onto self-driving cars.



    Fortunately for Google shareholders, both of these distractions have remained relatively tiny pet projects, and Google's core business has remained strong.
    But integrating a massive global hardware business is not a tiny pet project, nor is the idea that Google might now go head-to-head with
    Apple in the market for integrated tablets, phones, and TV gadgets.



    So we say again: If all Larry really wants in the Motorola deal is that bag of patents and plans to spin off Motorola's operating business immediately, fine. Even this will be tough to execute--getting approvals for the deal will take months if not a year or more--but it's a manageable challenge.



    But if Larry plans to keep Motorola and operate it as a stand-alone business, as Google said on the conference call yesterday, look out. This deal could easily end up in the same Hall of Shame that enshrines
    AOL Time Warner and many more of the worst mergers in history.
     
  16. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Google-Motorola Deal Means More Video Streaming to Android Devices?

    Google yesterday announced plans to acquire Motorola Mobility for $12.5 Billion, which instantly brings them into the mobile hardware market. Now the mobile platform is pretty interesting in and of itself, but that’s not the only reason this deal is being made. As part of the purchase, Google will gain ownership of Motorola’s 17,000 patents and 7,500 pending patents.


    Er what? Does that mean that the new Google TV will be Motorola-powered? While much of the focus has been on the “Holy Crap! Google Bought Motorola mobile phones!” reaction, not many have caught this small tidbit that seems to imply there’s far more to it.

    Actually, there was another portion of the post that mentioned the patents as being protective of Google Android. So perhaps those patents have to do with the streaming of video. Remember last year when Motorola announced a product to stream video to their mobiles and smartphones? Yeah that was the birth of Motorola Mobility just this past January.
    [​IMG]
    That department is more than just mobile phones, it’s also… (cue drum roll) set-top boxes. The original product was to allow users to be anywhere in the home and watch video on their devices. They then went on to purchase 4Home which would give the smartphones control of the “electricity and energy in the home” and was to be used for the video streaming.

    Google has also talked about home automation being a new focus for Android and this all ties together. Could it be that Google and Motorola had already hashed out a deal late last year and this is simply the culmination of the whole? The proverbial tip of the iceberg as it were?

    Perhaps what this will really become is Google video streaming from the cloud but only to Android devices with tech from Motorola Mobility (Gobility?), which could be smartphones and set-top boxes to begin with but later be maybe Android-on-a-chip for connected TVs and other devices?

    It’s an interesting merging of technologies. Google, the software giant, now takes on a branch of a hardware giant which has already been working rather closely. That means the two will be able to easily combine the tech and produce a single piece of kit that plugs into other items like Blu-Ray, TV, set-tops and even, perhaps, game consoles?

    Very, very interesting when you look at it like that.

    Maybe, it’s really a plan to take over the entire world through home automation funneled through a Gobility-powered set-top box that allows for complete control from a remote Gobility device…MUAHAHAHA!
     
  17. rrrobertsson

    rrrobertsson New Member

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    I love this deal:) - it is going to be a disruptive one for the living room - in 1-2 years from now. And that is really needed.
     
  18. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Motorola Mobility: "We are still feeling our way with Google TV"

    09/09/2011


    Today at the IBC trade show currently taking place in Amsterdam, IPTV News spoke to Steve McCaffery, Vice President of Motorola Home & Networks Mobility, EMEA to discuss the recent surprise news that Google will acquire Motorola Mobility, as well as Motorola's future video strategy.

    Motorola Mobility, which provides mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, network solutions and CPE devices such as set-top boxes, was split from the enterprise side of Motorola in January of this year, following a long planned separation which took place over a period of three years.

    The news therefore that Google will acquire Motorola Mobility came as a particular surprise as the company has made a number of strategic acquisition recently, including middleware specialists Dreampark, and appeared to be positioning itself for a renaissance in its fortunes.

    There was however already a strong preexisting relationship with Google, due to its choice of Android as the operating system of choice for its mobile devices. As Mr. McCaffery explains: "We had a number of periods where we had exclusivity around Android platforms, particularly things like Honeycomb for the tablets, and that obviously led to a very strong relationship with Google.

    "For me the acceleration of that relationship was brought about by a couple of factors - obviously the fight over patents, and the fact that Motorola had very strong patent assets, with over 17,000 filed and 9,000 pending. When we separated as a company from the rest of Motorola we ended up as a very healthy organization, albeit much smaller - we had no debts, we had a large cash reserve of US$ 3.5bn, and we had a very, very large patent portfolio, which has clearly paid dividends."

    Touching on the potential benefits of the deal for Motorola Mobility as a company, the Motorola VP stated: "If things are done right in terms of integration of our two companies then I think that it will benefit our company quite significantly. What I can tell you so far as to what the internal discussions have amounted to, as well as what we have presented to the press, is that the intention is to leave Motorola Mobility as a self-contained business within the Google organisation."

    While Motorola Mobility chief Sanjay Jha and Google bosses Larry Page and Eric Schmidt hammer out the details of how this will all be structured, how the reporting will be done, it is clearly in Google's interests to maintain the open Android base that they have today, according to Mr. McCaffery: "Although Motorola have a significant market share of Android-based devices, clearly other large volumes will come from the other large players in that space, like HTC, Samsung and Sony Ericsson, so it is in Google's interests to maintain those relationships, as much as they want to gain the benefits of owning devices themselves now."

    Regarding how Motorola Mobility's home business will fit into Google as an organization, the Motorola exec stated: "We are still feeling our way with Google TV - one thing I do know from Google is that they do very much respect the position we have in the marketplace, working directly with operators. We are the key supplier to companies such as Verizon, AT&T, Comcast and Time Warner in the US, and a plethora of operators here in Europe, and that won't change.

    "My belief is that to give the end consumer a common look, feel and experience of video content, you are going to have to do it through some form of aggregation point, and I think that aggregation point will always be an operator - whether a cable operator, or a telco TV operator. During the discussions we've had with Google, albeit in its infancy, they very much recognise that this is a very good value proposition to have."

    One thing Motorola Mobility is sure to bring to the Google family is the ability to smooth out relationships with operators and reassure them that we are not looking to bypass them. "Certainly, right through the Home business, we very much advocate that inside the Google organisation today, and I also know that Eric Schmidt and Larry Page are very much listening to that, and recognising that has real value, as this deal closes within the next year."

    Mr. McCaffery was bullish on the prospects of Motorola Mobility following closure of the acquisition, saying: "If you think about the very healthy position that Google has as an organisation from a cash and a market share and an operating perspective, you would think that could rub off on Motorola Mobility and enable us to grow non-organically in the future, with other aspirations we have in the market.

    "The total addressable market that we at Motorola Mobility have in Europe today is US$ 7bn, and the total addressable market that we have in North America is US$7bn. The difference from there on in is that in North America we can address five billion dollars of that seven total with the products that we have, while in Europe due to the products we have developed, we can only address two billion dollars of that market."

    As things stand, there remain quite a few areas where Motorola could expand its market share, and Google may well have ambitions for the TV market that do not fit in with the established business of its latest acquisition. However, these are at present only niggles, and together the two companies could well shake up the TV market for years to come.
    SOURCE
     
  19. Winkle

    Winkle New Member

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    This whole topic goes from a Disaster to the Life Saver... wheres my stinking update to my Sony Google TV..
     
  20. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Sep 12, 2011

    Apple asks courts to stay two Motorola Mobility lawsuits until Google has acquired the company

    On Friday, Apple filed motions to stay in two of its various lawsuits with Motorola, arguing that the pending acquisition of Motorola Mobility (MMI) by Google has resulted in "a fundamental loss of Motorola's patent rights". One of the lawsuits was started by MMI in the Southern District of Florida (with both parties asserting six patents each), and the other one by Apple in the Western District of Wisconsin (with Apple asserting 15 patents and MMI asserting 6 patents).
    Under the merger agreement with Google, MMI is severely restricted in its ability to enforce its patents and negotiate settlements (as I'll explain further below). Therefore, Apple's lawyers argue that MMI currently lacks standing (meaning the right to sue).


    Article Continued Here
     

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