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Google Threatens To Shut Off The Internet For Millions This July

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, May 27, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Google threatens to shut off the internet for millions this July / Scrape TV - The World on your side (click for full article)

    May 26 2012


    Menlo Park, CA - There may come a time when there is no more Google, when the world of the internet has changed so dramatically that the core services Google provides, search, is irrelevant or at least hardly used. That time is not today.


    Despite being the dominant and defining force on the internet for a decade, and despite facing stiff competition in many fields from well heeled competitors, and despite even facing trouble from governments around the world, Google has maintained. As powerful as they ever have been, Google continues to define the way we use the internet and, increasingly, how we interact with the world around us.


    Some, many, great companies have failed but other have persisted, adapting deftly to new environments and changing tastes. Google has certainly started that process, delving into many other fields, but whether or not they will be able to survive in the long term is something still to be seen. Still, for now, they are firmly in charge and the company which will most define the current state of communication including who will communicate, something which may change in July after the company warned about possibly shutting off access to millions this July.


    "We believe directly messaging affected users on a trusted site and in their preferred language will produce the best possible results. If more devices are cleaned and steps are taken to better secure the machines against further abuse, the notification effort will be well worth it," wrote Google security engineer Damian Menscher on the company blog.


    At issue is a dangerous form of malware which could disrupt DNS systems across the world. DNS is the system which manages all web traffic.

    It's not clear why Google is being so vague about resolving the problem and why they haven't just fixed it.
    If the DNS servers go down it will knock millions offline which yes, does include things like web browsing and email but computers will still be functional.


    "DNS serves being knocked offline is a worst case scenario but there is no doubt that this particular bug will be problematic. It is strange that Google hasn't come with a solution considering how affected they will be, but I guess they have their own plan in place," said Scrape TV Technology analyst Ken Kevins. "I can understand computer repair people not wanting to fix the problem because they are going to make all kinds of money if people can't access Facebook but for Google it is their lifeblood, people being online, and they don't seem to be taking it too seriously."


    Google is sending out messages to people they believe are infected with the bug, which of course will make more work for repair experts.
    "I doubt very much that the whole internet thing will go down in July but there could still be a lot of problems especially for people who don't really understand computers which is a huge chunk of the population and, frankly, mostly ones who will be affected by this virus," continued Kevins. "Hopefully things work out but if they don't, well I guess society will still go on in some way. People should be aware though that if the DNS goes out, all internet devices will cease to function including phones and tablets because it all works the same way."


    Microsoft, which also runs a search engine, isn't really being helpful in combating the virus for unknown reasons.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Google Online Security Blog: Notifying users affected by the DNSChanger malware (click for full article)

    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 12:00 PM
    Posted by Damian Menscher, Security Engineer


    Starting today we're undertaking an effort to notify roughly half a million people whose computers or home routers are infected with a well-publicized form of malware known as DNSChanger. After successfully alerting a million users last summer to a different type of malware, we've replicated this method and have started showing warnings via a special message that will appear at the top of the Google search results page for users with affected devices.


    The Domain Name System (DNS) translates familiar web address names like google.com into a numerical address that computers use to send traffic to the right place. The DNSChanger malware modifies DNS settings to use malicious servers that point users to fake sites and other harmful locations. DNSChanger attempts to modify the settings on home routers as well, meaning other computers and mobile devices may also be affected.



    Since the FBI and Estonian law enforcement arrested a group of people and transferred control of the rogue DNS servers to the Internet Systems Consortium in November 2011, various ISPs and other groups have attempted to alert victims. However, many of these campaigns have had limited success because they could not target the affected users, or did not appear in the user's preferred language (only half the affected users speak English as their primary language). At the current disinfection rate hundreds of thousands of devices will still be infected when the court order expires on July 9th and the replacement DNS servers are shut down. At that time, any remaining infected machines may experience slowdowns or completely lose Internet access.



    Our goal with this notification is to raise awareness of DNSChanger among affected users. We believe directly messaging affected users on a trusted site and in their preferred language will produce the best possible results. While we expect to notify over 500,000 users within a week, we realize we won't reach every affected user. Some ISPs have been taking their own actions, a few of which will prevent our warning from being displayed on affected devices. We also can't guarantee that our recommendations will always clean infected devices completely, so some users may need to seek additional help. These conditions aside, if more devices are cleaned and steps are taken to better secure the machines against further abuse, the notification effort will be well worth it.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
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