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GOOGLE: The First Version Of GTV Was A Mess, And Here's How We're Going To Fix It

Discussion in 'Google TV General Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, May 1, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    GOOGLE: The First Version Of Google TV Was A Mess, And Here's How We're Going To Fix It (GOOG) (click for full article)

    "Don't give up on Google TV quite yet.


    The first version of the product sold so poorly that one of its partners, Logitech, had more returns than sales in the first quarter of 2011, and its CEO later said that betting on Google TV had "cost us dearly."


    But last fall, Google updated the Google TV software, and followed up with some new partnership announcements at the CES show in January.


    Now - finally - the first of those new devices is coming to market. Actually, it's two devices: a pair of 47-inch and 55-inch TV sets from LG, which will ship this month. They'll be followed shortly by standalone Google TV boxes from Sony and Vizio.


    We recently caught up with Google TV manager Rishi Chandra, who was one of the first leaders of the team, coming over from Google Apps back in 2010.


    He explained that Google TV is really just getting started. Here's why: "
     
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  2. gadgetrants

    gadgetrants New Member

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    It's interesting that, for me anyway, the report really focused on inessential window dressing, like ARM vs. Intel processors and "personalized search". (I was particularly insulted by the comment, "Eventually, Chandra believes, customers will stop distinguishing between sources of video. But for now, people still think of TV differently — and want a product that reflects that." Every consumer who owns a Revue perfectly understands the video-source issue.) I can all but guarantee that neither of those features, nor any of the other issues highlighted in the report, will differentiate Google from other "integrated" video products.

    The one and only issue -- the one Google needs to spearhead and trumpet loudly and clearly -- is content. Google needs to grab the major networks by the horns, engineer an industry-wide agreement (the cable companies can go to "hello kitty" as my daughter likes to say), and find a way to provide on-demand, live streaming video of as much GOOD content as possible.

    No matter how good the hardware is, no matter how fast and intuitive the personalized search system is ("Wow Google, how did you know I was thinking of THAT episode of 'Adams Family'"???), if the content offerings continue to have the huge swiss-cheese holes and usage restrictions that they currently do, people won't care. And they won't buy.

    -Matt
     
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you. IMO the two big issues that need improvement are lack of premium content and high prices (initially prices were too high). And didn't Eric Schmidt proclaim that by the middle of the year "most" televisions will come with GTV installed. Ha! Dream on. It's already May 3rd - and not one single new television (with GTV) has been shipped yet this year.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
  4. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    Google negotiating agreements with the networks to allow access to Google TV can't possibly be good business. Any site funded by ad revenue that allows free access to a PC, should also allow free access to a streaming player such as Google TV. If Google pays ABC, then Fox and every other network will see that and require payment from Google as well. Then all sites currently allowing free access to Google TV will block Google TV and request payment. Ultimately I would hope advertiser funded programming is available for free to PCs and PC like devices such as Google TV, no other solution makes sense to me. As far as pay services, Google TV already has the most popular Netflix and Amazon Instant Video, I would like to see the best quality service, Vudu added as well.

    As far as the many opinions that Google TV is in need of vast improvements, it is fine with me if the product is made more user friendly as long as that doesn't limit its usefulness to people like me that don't mind having to know how to use something and don't require neat and pretty.
     
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I think Google had a good idea to spend $100 million for more professional YouTube channels. These new channels are called "Creator Channels" - I looked at them closely yesterday for the first time. While some of them are kind of nice - I would describe the bulk of them as "semi-premium" content. In other words a nice addition to YouTube - but not currently something that can replace true "premium" content. Not yet anyways.


    Actually I've noticed that quite a bit of the nice premium content that I used to watch on YouTube with GTV - no longer works with GTV. I get a message to update my Flash version. I suspect that this is a DRM (digital rights management) issue and requires Flash 11. I also suspect that's why YouTube currently doesn't support movie rentals for GTV. So overall the $100 million spent on "semi-professional" YouTube channels hasn't meant much in terms of content improvement (because other premium YouTube content is shrinking on the GTV platform).
     
  6. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I do like Google paying for content to make it available on YouTube, that is great but of course doesn't do anything to set Google TV apart from the competition. The fact our Google TV devices are unable to play some small portion of the available YouTube content is a problem which hopefully gets fixed very quickly.
     

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