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Google Puts Chrome OS On Your TV With Its Own HDMI Stick

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2015
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Hmm interesting! I wonder if this Chromebit device will have a special "TV friendly" interface? I tend to think so - and if that's the case then I would think there would be a way to utilize the TV friendly interface on a 'regular' Chromebox?

    IMO this seems to be the path Google is taking for having a browser on a TV - thus making any (official) Chrome browser aspirations for Android TV even less likely.
     
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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  4. guest

    guest Active Member

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    In the second link, it says this: "Intel recently announced the Intel Compute Stick, a $150 HDMI dongle that does the same thing but with full Windows 8.1 on board."

    For those with a Logitech Revue (or other Google TV), could that Intel Compute Stick be plugged into the Revue's USB connector to perform windows-based activities?

    A related question would be plugging the Chromebit into the Revue to access a ChromeOS - if that would be possible.

    Edit: The Chromebit comes with a "Smart Ready Controller".
     
  5. Travel

    Travel Active Member

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    So, you could stick the Chromebit into an AV receiver HDMI port, and put the Logitech k700 keyboard unifying receiver USB in the other end of the Chromebit.

    Sounds good to me, especially the 2GB RAM. It's getting like an "assemble your own upgraded GoogleTV" kind of a deal.

    Only, you have to switch inputs to go from the Chrome browser to the Nvida Shield to your TV/cable mode. Geez, maybe they'll think of something to get around that, and call it "AndroidTV with an embedded optimal for TV Chrome browser and TV Overlay" or something. Nahh, that can't be done; who ever heard of one box that can do all that?
     
  6. guest

    guest Active Member

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    Google Intros Affordable Lineup of Chromebooks Unveils the Chromebit HDMI Dongle Droid Life

    A comment from the link above: Pretty sure the Android TV can do about the same and more than Chrome OS.

    Reply:

    With 1 key point... ChromeOS can "sideload" a full version of Linux (ARM or i386). You can't really do that on an Android device (ok, yes, there was that Ubuntu "experiment" where you could have a full version of Ubuntu 12.04 running, but it was craptastic and slow as hell, so it doesn't count lol).
     
  7. Travel

    Travel Active Member

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    Actually, side loading a browser at all doesn't really count. AndroidTV doesn't come with a browser. Logically, if the Chromebit is made specifically to put into an HDTV, this Chrome browser will be formatted for "the big screen" and, hopefully, optimal remote/keyboard control.

    Sure, I can envision all kinds of TV-compatibility "ins n' outs" tweaking with the Chromebit displaying on HDTV, especially at first. But, it would seem to be a whole lot better browser-on-TV solution than side loading a random browser onto an AndroidTV device. The Chromebit is made for TV use, and will presumably have full, official Google support/updates tied into general, Chrome updates.

    I also like the fact that a Chrome browser through a Chromebit will sync with a Google account.
     
  8. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    The Chrome browser on Chrome OS devices is a full desktop browser with Flash support. Thus it can be used for many web sites such as Hulu and all the TV Networks' sites. The Chrome browser that can be sideloaded onto Android TV is a mobile browser without Flash support. The mobile browser probably can be toggled to view sites as "desktop" - but there still would be no Flash support. I've read about all the various attempts at Flash workarounds for Android browsers - but the streaming quality and reliability is generally lacking (if it works at all).
     
  9. guest

    guest Active Member

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    It seems to me that Android TV, as a technological "advance", is D.O.A.

     
  10. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't that be nice? I suspect these new dongles are just intended to be used as a cheap/compact desktop replacement with a traditional keyboard/mouse. Heck, it would be a great step forward if the industry would just settle on a standard that would permit a generic keyboard/mouse with mic & headphone output to work without special drivers.
     
  11. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I tend to agree. In reading the Google Chrome OS blog - they (Google) seem to be posturing the Chromebit dongle as primarily for the education/business market. Thus a standard keyboard/mouse will likely be the way to control Chromebit. However from everything that I've read the Logitech K400 keyboard makes a good controller for the Chromebox units - so the K400 should also work well with the Chromebit. (The Logitech K400 keyboard comes with a trackpad - so no need for a mouse).

    (The Logitech K400 keyboard is similar in size to the Logitech Revue K700 keyboard. The difference being that the K400 is not a GTV keyboard but rather a generic keyboard intended for a computer).
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2015
  12. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

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    Which is fine for those who love that keyboard, but I don't think I'm in the minority in expecting a smaller/more traditional remote for use with a media device - where most things can be done with the standard transport buttons, and the screens are designed with "leanback" in mind.

    The point here is that just because these devices are in the HDMI dongle form-factor, doesn't necessarily mean they're any better suited to be used with a TV than any other device (PC, tablet, laptop, NUC, chromebox, Android PC, etc) that supports an HDMI output. There are other markets where these devices may make a lot more sense.
     

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