Quantcast

Google Is Working On A New 'Simpler' Android TV

Discussion in 'Android TV' started by CatfishRivers, Apr 5, 2014.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Messages:
    14,605
    Likes Received:
    877
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Exclusive: this is Android TV | The Verge (click for full article)

    by Sean Hollister - April 5, 2014

    From the article:

    ** According to documents obtained exclusively by The Verge, Google is about to launch a renewed assault on your television set called Android TV. Major video app providers are building for the platform right now. Android TV may sound like a semantic difference - after all, Google TV was based on Android - but it's something very different. Android TV is no longer a crazy attempt to turn your TV into a bigger, more powerful smartphone. "Android TV is an entertainment interface, not a computing platform," writes Google. "It's all about finding and enjoying content with the least amount of friction." It will be "cinematic, fun, fluid, and fast."


    What does that all mean? It means that Android TV will look and feel a lot more like the rest of the set top boxes on the market, including Apple TV, Amazon's Fire TV, and Roku.


    Google's new vision for Android TV is less ambitious and easier to understand. The company is calling for developers to build extremely simple TV apps for an extremely simple set-top-box interface. **


    See more at: http://www.theverge.com/2014/4/5/5584604/this-is-android-tv
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Messages:
    14,605
    Likes Received:
    877
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Well my thoughts are that this article is describing what will be the Nexus TV. IMO a good bet is that it will be announced at Google I/O in June. From the article this is obviously not a super-duper GTV box - but rather something similar to Roku or the Amazon Fire TV. IMO based on the article it's doubtful this "Android TV" box has HDMI pass-thru (integration) with a cable box.

    Also based on the article saying that Android TV is going to be less like a computer - I take that to mean that a web browser certainly isn't going to be front and center.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
  3. ulises1954

    ulises1954 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2011
    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Looks like the same HISENSE PULSE PRO ANDROID TV, New Android OS Screen Shots from last month... However the Hisense-Pulse-Pro will come with the Chrome Web-Browser!

    May be instead of the Jellybean Update, we will get this New Android-TV OS in our SONY NSZ-GS7/GS8??
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
  4. retroben

    retroben Active Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2013
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    46
    Trophy Points:
    28
    The "Android TV" idea makes more sense if they mean that it runs on the ART runtime which stands for Android-run-time.
    Especially when they say fluid and fast.
     
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Messages:
    14,605
    Likes Received:
    877
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I wonder why would Hulu build a Hulu Plus app for this Android TV when in over 3 years time they've steadfastly refused to build a Hulu Plus app for GTV?

    I'm probably different than most here in that I actually prefer something more like a computer that is very browser centric. (I don't own a PC). So something like a Chromebox will probably suit my needs better.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
    • Like Like x 6
  6. ericd

    ericd Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Well, at least they're talking to the app developers before they release the box (or stick or TV or ... whatever). Now all they have to do is get the content providers on board. The future success of any streaming device is going to depend on which service can obtain the rights to stream the most content (or offer simpler means to work around streaming rights issues, which is what the Fire TV seems to be doing now). That was always GTV's biggest flaw. It remains to be seen how the app developers and content providers will react to the ease of which Fire TV can side-load apps. If they accept or embrace the work-arounds available to Amazon's box it will continue to succeed. If not, it could get ugly when Fire TV users start receiving updates that kill the unauthorized installs.

    Dumbing down the device, just for the sake of dumbing it down, won't work this go around. The Chromecast's success was more of a fluke than it was a shift in the way people want to watch TV. It hit the right price-point at just the right time. Personally, I don't want to have to have a separate device running just to watch an app on the TV. This was always GTV's biggest strength and the reason I never cared for Play-on or Plex. If Google had made more content available from the start, instead of forcing it's early adopters to seek out the various hard to find and implement work-arounds, it could have kept their initial base and expanded from there.

    If Android TV releases with an under-powered CPU, trying to beat Apple, Roku and Amazon with a lower price, the Chromecast will wipe out that user base. If they try to go over the top and release a high-powered do all device, the Chromebox and various NUC HTPC's will kill them there. As much as I hate to say it, Google needs to just lay-low, lick their wounds from the GTV fiasco and wait for the streaming player market to shake itself out.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
    • Like Like x 2
  7. overtimeman

    overtimeman Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Clemson,S.C.
    You are right about the Chrome Box.With it you can actually access ABC,CBS,NBC,and the others.I cancelled my order today with tigerdirect.com and got the Asus from amazon($179) to be delivered Tuesday.CatfishRivers they have your keyboard with the Asus listed with it now.Logitech 400.Gonna keep my Sony GS7 up and running for the time being.One thing I can say for Sony is the fact they did GTV right quality wise.The keyboard and unit has stood up to almost two years this July of heavy duty use!No I haven't given up on GTV but the Asus will add the function of full flash into the mix.Still enjoy my Roku also.CatfishRivers you ought to head over to amazon.com and get the combo offered and you'll be all set up! :cool:
     
  8. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    3,846
    Likes Received:
    462
    Trophy Points:
    83
    It sure looks to me that this device will do a lot less than Google TV, especially of the things I want from a streaming box. I guess we don't really know if the rumors are true or not but one thing that appears to be true, there is a big market for simple streaming boxes, Amazon Fire TV appears to be selling well.
     
  9. ericd

    ericd Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    28
    True, but what can Google do to trump (or even compete) with the Amazon box. If they try to dumb it down (or as they say "simplify") the new box and try to compete on price, they'll be going head-to-head against their own Chromecast device. If I were them, I'd drop the Android moniker (as you have previously stated they should), release the box in the mid-range price between the Chromecast and Fire TV and sell the device as the Chromecast II. That way they can capitalize on both segments, the people looking to upgrade from the Chromecast and people who haven't been able to use the Chromecast because of it's need for another device
     
  10. Scuzzo

    Scuzzo Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    87
    Trophy Points:
    28
    so 4th times the charm? if there is no HDMI pass through the only thing that differentiates GTV is gone.... and if they think they can dictate yet again to devs that you should develop for TV... blah blah... i dont see it happening... its a slick interface but its a bit late to the game for me to be excited... mho.... just get a good quad core tablet and a 30 buck chrome cast and you will have every thing and more that GTV4 will provide... then again if its something cool i may buy one.... but it will have to be compelling.. and cheap... they may just have made the chrome cast too good.. but heck i was not going to buy an FTV either... hit the 100 buck price point and it becomes impulse... but 250 to 300... we will see...
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,127
    Likes Received:
    163
    Trophy Points:
    63
    A lot of people like that. A lot of people don't. *shrugs* ... Case in point, I own multiple tablets and have multiple ways to stream content to my TVs, and rarely use it.

    I assume it will hit the $100 price point. I assume it will be loaded and competitive with Amazon's Fire TV just like the Nexus 7 has been competitive with the Amazon Fire. And I do expect it to be dumbed down just like the Fire TV. On the surface the biggest difference will be Google's services .vs. Amazon's .vs. Apple's. If either allow their content on the other, I'll be surprised.

    But the differences I care about are going to be the things they don't promote:

    - Will it support voice search and will it be more all encompassing like it is on Google TV? Or dumbed down like it is with the Fire TV?
    - Will it support a browser, or will I be able to sideload one? Plex? XBMC? etc
    - Will it support standard Google service and will I be able to access the playstore and/or side load to achieve the same?
    - If I have to sideload, will it run most standard tablet/phone Apps well? Or will only certain things work?
    - Will it support a bluetooth keyboard/mouse, or a USB keyboard/mouse?
    - Will it support MX Player and allow us to play videos right from our media servers? (hopefully with decent codec support)
    - Will it support a PS or Xbox controller?
    - Will it support an SD card or thumb drive for local storage and expansion?
    - Will sideloaded Apps be treated like every other App as far as how you launch it?
    - Will we be able to access the KitKat desktop if/when we want?
    - Will we be able to root it and run our own custom kernels and ROMs?

    The Fire TV is already starting to click in a number of those areas, but it's going to be a struggle as it's running a custom version of Android and doesn't include Google Services. It may be worth the fight, but I'll probably hold out to see what Google comes up with.

    As soon as someone figures out how to fully open up one of these devices, the Chinese Android sticks are going to be officially stomped.
     
  12. ericd

    ericd Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    28
    True, but it'll be interesting to see how some developers and providers react to the Amazon device being able to side-load their apps so easily. They might embrace the new box or they could see the box as an attempt to get their content without their authorization (or $$$ kickbacks).

    Open sourced providers like XBMC and Plex will surely side with Amazon and embrace the box. Other, not so open providers, TWC (and other cable companies) and HBO may see Amazon's work-arounds as a slap in the face and step in to stop them from cornering the market
     
  13. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,127
    Likes Received:
    163
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I'm not sure they'll care as long as long as Amazon officially toes the line, but we'll see. Let's see what happens when someone figures out how to root or load custom ROMs in to the Fire TV like they've partially figured out how to do with the Fire HDX tablet.
     
  14. Travel

    Travel Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2012
    Messages:
    778
    Likes Received:
    69
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Boston
    Well, as a "PC cord cutter," this is a "non-product" from my point of view. Especially when an article uses terms as "stripping away," when I'm looking for terms like "adding-to;" as in adding the Jelly bean update, not stripping away the Chrome browser, lol.

    One thing that I did like in the article was that Google is building this themselves. That marks Google's entry into the manufacturing of it's own devices. Which, of course, for the optimistic, keeps hope alive for a Google built and software provided, powerful game box with full-blown, Chrome browsered Jellybean updated GoogleTV app/Chromecast within. Google's competing with the "simple boxes" with the subject box, above, and recent articles suggest that they may be developing for a self-made gamebox.

    However, this article did discuss games with the new device, so maybe Google's recent interest in games is limited to this device.

    So, as it stands right now, the Pulse Pro with the Android 4.2.2 and updated Chrome browser is where my interests lie. Yes, the HDMI pass through, cable overlay and full Google Services, etc., count. Using home theater mini-computers, etc., is going backward, imo.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2014
  15. galfert

    galfert Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    For me HDMI pass through is the most important thing that Android TV must retain.

    For cord cutters I can see how this doesn't matter.

    But having HDMI pass through enables live TV to be much more enjoyable with guides and program discovery tools. It also allows PIP and it allows potential notifications on top of live TV or DVR content.

    It is also the only way that TV becomes smart. Otherwise you are just removing the TV from the experience and it becomes something else, namely digital media without TV.

    Those that claim that switching inputs is no big deal are blind to the benefits of integration and TV tools.

    I think even further into the future that HDMI should be irrelevant. As the connectivity in a home theater should act more like a network. Then you could switch inputs intelligently and media discovery could integrate and communicate as to what devices are available and what media they all have. The DVR should be one of these devices and allow for queries to what was recorded and to what is live or soon to be live. Until this vision is a reality, in the mean time HDMI pass through is important.

    Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 4
  16. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    3,846
    Likes Received:
    462
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Yes although HDMI input is important to cord cutters with OTA and I would think a majority of cord cutters have an antenna for local channels. I know our household sure uses the ability to combine traditional TV with internet TV in one HDMI input.
     
  17. overtimeman

    overtimeman Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Clemson,S.C.
    I know some will be disappointed if the New Android TV from Google doesn't have a browser.Remember Vizio came out with a streaming unit only and it hasn't even showed up as as blip on the consumer radar.I know at the local Wal Mart it isn't selling at all.The Amazon Fire has great specs and I like everyone else want to see what Google themselves put inside their new unit.Guess Netfix is enjoying all this free publicity.We second generation users will have to wait it out on last years JB 4.2 since KK 4.4 is this years news.Crap I still have a new GS7 I purchased at half price in da closet I bought with great expectations.Get my Asus Chrome Box Tuesday and this will be the last $$$$ I'm going to spend on set top units.LOL!,Saw a quote that stated,"Life is meant to be lived,not sitting in front of a TV." :)
     
  18. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,127
    Likes Received:
    163
    Trophy Points:
    63
    The Fire TV doesn't have a browser, but it took like all of 2 days for people to report that Firefox will run on it WITH flash support. I'd prefer if it was fully integrated in to voice search like it is with the Google TV, but I can live without that if it means a successful product that people will buy and developers will support.

    Streaming devices need to be fast, simple, and easy to use with uncomplicated remotes - or they won't last long in the market. However, as long as the device is built-on a real OS with solid hardware specs, there shouldn't be much in the way of getting what we want out of the box. Would Amazon or Google block a Browser from being added to their store if it was adapted to work with the device? Hopefully not, and if there's enough demand ... it will surely happen.
     
  19. ericd

    ericd Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    28
    When the name change to Android TV was first announced, it was also stated that Google was preparing a new UI using the Kit Kat OS to coincide with the new moniker Android 4.4 KitKat TV Play: Google to dominate TV, like smartphones | BGR . Although the Verge article doesn't mention the OS of the new system, simple math should make it plain what Google is intending. If the new device doesn't run Kit Kat, it'll be a bigger flop than GTV. That's about the only way Google's box can compete with Amazon's newest entry.

    The one thing I found interesting about the Fire TV announcement (I can't believe no one else has mentioned this) was the fact that as soon as the announcement was made, the device was immediately available for order (not just pre-order). That was a brilliant move by Amazon. They were able to capitalize instantly on the buzz created by the announcement. Although I wasn't personally blown away by the $99 price point or the specs of the unit, Fire TV's are flying out of their warehouses (the add-on controller was sold out before I got home from work and had a chance to research the new box). Although, I had no intention (and still don't) of buying Amazon's unit, I was considering buying the controller to use with my current GTV. (sadly I don't see the controller working well with my LG TV)

    If Google were to follow a similar strategy at IO, announce their new Android 4.4 Kit Kat powered box, then turn to the scrren and say "here it is , you can order it now for $99 and have it in 2 days". I'd be so caught up in the excitement, I'd order one on the spot. Despite all the times Google has let me down with the current GTV devices
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2014
  20. jonw747

    jonw747 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,127
    Likes Received:
    163
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I use smart universal remote controls, so I'm fine with IR based devices without HDMI pass-through. So for instance, the Apple TV integrates much better in to my system than Google TV. It's easy to switch inputs, and there's never been a notification coming from my Google TV that I ever wanted to interrupt what I was watching.

    Not to take anything away from your arguments in favor of pass-through, but here are some more problems I've had with it (at least on the GS7):

    - The GS7 locks in to one output resolution. This means I can't take advantage of native passthrough from my DVR. I can't watch 720P in 720P.
    - We lose support for 1080p24.
    - I have to trust the upscaler in a $100 device to produce 1080p accurately when I'd much rather trust my TV.
    - If the GS7 locks up or fails to sync its video correctly, it's difficult to diagnose. Is it the TV? Is it the DVR? I try to remember that the GS7 is in line and may need to be rebooted, but it's easy to forget.
    - I don't use PIP. I tend to watch something that's recorded, and then I go watch something else that's recorded.
    - If we're channel surfing, we seem to always use the guide built-in to the DVR. Primetime is not fast enough, or seamless enough to be worth the bother and for us it requires picking up a secondary remote.
    - Google TV doesn't support the DVR functionality of my STB. If I could quickly start or resume playback of a series recording we've been watching - we just might use that - but that's a whole lot of smarts to save us the few seconds it takes to bring up the DVR list and find the next episode manually.
    - Google TV only supports a single input. We actually have a pair of DVRs, but the Sony can't control the second. This makes for an inconsistent interface.

    So the problem isn't so much that HDMI pass through in its current form isn't useful, but until all the negatives can be erased, it can be an impediment to the product. There's no doubt that HDMI Passthrough makes the product (especially the setup) more complex - and this is not a good thing for a market that's selling ease of use. Oh, and it certainly does add expense and limits the hardware choices. Some will be happy with Marvel's latest chip set, but I'll be a lot happier to have a high-end Snapdragon CPU/GPU (or similar) in my next streaming box.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

flirc android tv

,
galaxy s4 wont connect to miracast on hisence android tv
,
hisense pulse root