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Google is "absolutely committed" to GTV

Discussion in 'More News from Your Google TV News Team' started by Rickaren, Aug 27, 2011.

  1. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    Google's Schmidt sees more partners for Google TV



    EDINBURGH, Scotland | Sat Aug 27, 2011 12:04pm EDT



    Aug 27 (Reuters) - Google is "absolutely committed" to its fledgling television business and expects many more partners to join it soon, Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt said on Saturday.


    Google TV, which allows viewers to mix Web and television content on TV screens via a browser, has received lukewarm reviews and been blocked by the major U.S. networks since its launch in the United States in October.
    Schmidt told the Edinburgh television festival its lack of success so far was partly because it was a feature designed into televisions, devices which consumers tend to replace only about once every five years.


    "We're absolutely committed to staying, to improving Google TV," he said, adding that new companies would be joining existing partners Sony and Logitech for the next version. Logitech makes computer mice, speakers, webcams and keyboards.

    "I believe that they're both going to be on board and I believe there are many more coming. Wait shortly for an announcement," he said.


    Google has long harboured ambitions to extend its $28 billion online advertising business to the television arena, where the lion's share of global ad budgets is spent.


    It owns YouTube, the world's most popular online video site, but has not announced any profits from that business since buying it in 2006.


    Schmidt said in a keynote speech on Friday that he expected Google TV to launch in Europe early next year.
    On Saturday, he said Google had not yet resolved its differences with U.S. networks ABC , NBC and CBS, and hoped the company would not encounter similar problems for its British launch.
    "We certainly have talked to them about reversing their position and we certainly hope that won't happen here," he said, adding that Google was in talks with UK broadcasters.


    Like other industries disrupted by the Internet, the television industry is broadly suspicious of Google, fearing the company will steal its advertising revenues without contributing towards the high costs of programming.
    Google argues that the Internet can expand the total advertising market by providing better-targeted and more effective ads that will encourage companies to spend more.

    KNOWLEDGE SHARING
    Google could glean valuable insights into U.S. viewing habits from the $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility , which it announced last week.


    Motorola owns the world's largest set top box business and has close relationships with U.S. cable companies -- who have expressed concern about the acquisition.


    Schmidt said he could not talk in detail about Google's plans for that business until the merger was completed, but said there were "interesting ideas" about how it could help Google's existing television business.


    "We're intending to run Motorola, which would include the set top box business, as a completely separate business. That does not mean that there won't be communication between the two, and obviously sharing and knowledge sharing," he said.
    Schmidt also said British Prime Minister David Cameron would be making a mistake if he tried to shut down online communications during periods of social unrest.


    Cameron had asked authorities to look at the possibility of such measures in the wake of riots that tore through England earlier this month and were partly organized on Research in Motion's BlackBerry Messenger, Twitter and Facebook.

    Such moves have been widely condemned as repressive when used by other countries, especially during the Arab Spring uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East.


    "I think it's a mistake. I hope that's a clear answer," Schmidt said. "Whatever the problem was, which I don't really understand... the Internet was a reflection of that problem but turning the Internet on and off is not going to fix it."



    SOURCE
     
  2. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    You can watch the Eric Schmidt's Edinburgh Festival above. If you want to skip to Eric Schmidt's speech then go to 08:21 time mark.

    Here's my transcription of the first minute of his presentation:

    The rest of his speech is available here: Full Transcript: Eric Schmidt's Edinburgh Festival Keynote | paidContent:UK
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
  3. docsch

    docsch New Member

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    Anyone with long experience in politics or corporate announcements knows that statements like " Google is "absolutely committed" " gives a very high probability that the opposite is going to happen. A statement like this from Schmidt regarding Google TV is a like calling time for a death certificate in the emergency room.
     
  4. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    So far, the market has rejected Google TV and if that continues then yes, Google TV will lose commitments from all companies involved. I expect the new software version will improve sales and the product will continue to be supported by Google. So whether or not the opposite of "absolutely committed" happens isn't entirely within Google's control, a lot of great products don't reach their intended market and diappear. I don't understand why Google TV products aren't selling better and at a price that makes sense for the companies involved, I love Google TV, but selling at a loss and supporting a product with no future would make no sense. Google could continue to fight the battle, takeover all hardware manufacturing responsibility, eat that loss and try to build the business and make a profit in the long run from additional advertising but that scenario doesn't look likely to me.

    These statements from business executives are always subject to sales, poor sales and the product will lose support and disappear. For my simple use as long as a few important sites continue to work great with Google TV, I will continue to use my two Revues which already do all I asked from the product when I got involved.
     
  5. vetvito

    vetvito New Member

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    I don't think the market has rejected GTV. I think its just a very small market right now.
     
  6. bidger

    bidger Member

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    Uh, small market adoption = rejection.
     
  7. arrowrand

    arrowrand New Member

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    It's not quite that cut and dry. The selection of Google TV devices has been limited and expensive, and quite frankly, odd. If Google TV version 2 hardware comes in different shapes and sizes, offers different functionality based on model purchased and comes in at different price points things may be quite different.

    Yes, you can call Google TV a rejected device, but that's a bit premature if Google and it's TV partners can right the software and hardware ship. This is a market that everyone involved with Google TV wants to be in.


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  8. arrowrand

    arrowrand New Member

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    So, along with Google TV there is a high probability that Gmail, Google + and Android (as well as a lot of other Google products) are all going away too as Schmidt made the same "absolutely committed" kinds of statements about them as well.

    Google TV may well be discontinued at some future date, but Schmidt's comment is in no way a kiss of death.


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  9. vetvito

    vetvito New Member

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    What I mean is, look at the requirements to really enjoy products like Apple TV, Roku, and Google TV.

    HDMI, and home network. Most US homes don't have these. Google TV is in the same category as HTPC, a very small niche market.
     
  10. arrowrand

    arrowrand New Member

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    What numbers do you have to back that up?

    Strategy Analytics says that 60% of US homes have broadband access. That's most. There are other research reports that peg the number at closer to 70%.

    The Consumer Electronics Association says that 70% of US homes have at least 1 HDTV. That's most.




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  11. vetvito

    vetvito New Member

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    Now what about the number of homes that have both? Also, the number of homes that have or are interested in a cable companion?
     
  12. arrowrand

    arrowrand New Member

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    I'm not sure how many homes have both HDMI and broadband, but given how close the percentages are I'd say "most".

    As to how many would want a cable companion, I'd say the question is how many don't yet realize that they want a cable companion?


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