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Google Chrome Gets Do Not Track Support

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Google Chrome gets Do Not Track support (click for full article)

    Sep. 14, 2012 (4:30 pm) By: Lee Mathews

    "Protecting a web user's privacy choices is a hot-button issue, and it's at the heart of the Do Not Track discussion. Mozilla got the DNT ball rolling, Opera quickly offered up its support, and even Microsoft embraced the emerging standard in Internet Explorer 10. Others, however, remained aloof. Google, for example.


    With its own array of privacy protection options (like the Keep My Opt-Outs extension), Google didn't seem all that interested in offering Chrome users support for Do Not Track. That came as a surprise to many observers, particularly because you'll find Google's name among the list of participating advertisers who agreed to participate in the Digital Advertising Alliance's "Self Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral Advertising."


    Whatever the reason might be, Google has seen the light and DNT support is now taking shape in Chrome. It's available as an option under Chrome's privacy settings, but for now all that the checkbox does is spawn the alert box you see above. That's not much of an issue, however, because many online advertisers have yet to implement support for the beacon anyway."
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2012
  2. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    Has a setting for this made it to the chrome app on GTV?
     
  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Why Do Not Track is worse than a miserable failure | ZDNet (click for full article)

    Summary: As a consumer, you'd think that the meaning of "Do Not Track" is pretty clear. But the big data-collecting companies that are behind this standard seem intent on making sure it does nothing at all


    By Ed Bott for The Ed Bott Report | September 21, 2012 -- 12:35 GMT (05:35 PDT)


    "In theory, Do Not Track is a brilliant idea.


    It's an elegant, simple bit of technology. A user-agent (typically a web browser, but it could be anything) that is compliant with the Do Not Track standard adds a tiny snippet of information in its header. DNT=1 means that the owner of that user-agent has expressed a desire that his or her online movements not be tracked.


    Too bad it doesn't work.


    The trouble with this voluntary standard is that it requires good faith cooperation from the parties at the other end of the web connection. And those parties are actively subverting the intent of DNT, as I wrote about earlier this year. (See Do Not Track debate reveals cracks in online privacy consensus.)


    As a consumer, you'd think that the meaning of "Do Not Track" is pretty clear. You're making a polite request of the web sites and advertisers: "Don't collect and store any information about me without my explicit permission."


    And yet, according to Sarah Downey, an attorney and privacy advocate who works for the online-privacy firm Abine, that's not what's happening."
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2012

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