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EU Gives Google 'Weeks' To Ease Antitrust Concerns

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, May 21, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    EU gives Google 'weeks' to ease antitrust concerns - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 - (click for full article)

    "BRUSSELS (AP) - The European Union has given Google "a matter of weeks" to propose remedies to antitrust concerns arising from its alleged dominant position in the online search market.


    European antitrust chief Joaquin Almunia said that after a one-and-a-half-year investigation following complaints from Google's rivals, the EU had pinpointed four areas of concern centering how the internet giant deals with its search results, how content is used, how advertising is run on its search engine and how advertisers are restricted from using rival search engines.


    Alumina called on Google to propose the solutions to the concerns quickly or face formal antitrust investigation and charges. At the end of a formal EU investigation, Google could theoretically face a fine of up to 10 percent of its annual revenue.


    "Restoring competition swiftly to the benefit of users at an early stage is always preferable to lengthy proceedings," Almunia said.


    Google, the world's most popular search engine, also faces a similar antitrust investigation by the Federal Trade Commission in the United States."
     
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Google's darkening agenda - Salon.com (click for full article)

    The company's attitudes toward privacy have grown increasingly dismissive. Now some countries are taking notice

    BY DAVID ROSEN, ALTERNET

    "In 1999, Scott McNealy, the former head of Sun MicroSystems, reportedly declared, "You have zero privacy anyway....Get over it." He unintentionally let the proverbial cat out of the bag of the digital age.


    In 2009, McNealy's assessment was confirmed by Google's CEO, Eric Schmidt. In an interview with NBC's Mario Bartiromo, he proclaimed, "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place." Schmidt's words have become Google's new mantra. Welcome to 21st-century corporate morality.


    Now, a decade-plus later, McNealy's prophetic words have take on a far more sinister significance than he probably intended. They are increasingly becoming the operating assumption of the digital corporate state. Whether going online, using a PC, smartphone, tablet or digital TV, users can no longer assume they have any privacy. In fact, users should assume they have absolutely no privacy."
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2012

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