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Digital Revolution Could Be Curtains For Old Theaters

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Aug 11, 2012.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Digital revolution could be curtains for old theaters : Entertainment (click for full article)

    "For much of the 20th century, going to the movies meant walking to a single-screen neighborhood theater, where the light from a projector passed through strips of celluloid. Jeffrey Eisentraut loved that experience so much when he was growing up that he eventually moved to Southern Illinois to run three historic theaters: the Orpheum in Hillsboro, the Canna in Gillespie and the Roseland in Pana. But now Eistentraut and other independent operators are under siege.


    The villain is technology. The movie studios are rapidly replacing traditional reels of celluloid film with hard drives that are cheaper for them to ship and compatible with lucrative 3-D technology. Hollywood says that the digital conversion will benefit moviegoers with consistently bright images and state-of-the-art sound. But in the next few months, exhibitors who don't purchase expensive new digital projectors may be forced out of business.


    Since the first flicker of a nickelodeon, movie-theater owners have invested in many upgrades, from stereo sound to stadium seating, even while losing large portions of their audience to television, home video and the Internet. But the cost of the digital conversion is unprecedented: about $50,000 per auditorium."
     
  2. chopper

    chopper Active Member

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    Hmmm, our drive in recently upgraded this. Was not aware it cost so much. Will have to go out and support them more often.
     
  3. bidger

    bidger Member

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    No, the villain is the Hollywood studios. Technology didn't make the decision, the studios did. This is the same industry that fought vehemently against the introduction of home video, which has made them billions. There is no theater in my home town, you have to go to the Mall, which I do very infrequently. Drive-In is for families, so it doesn't apply to me. Having widescreen and hi res video @ home, 5.1 audio, and control over my concessions, bathroom breaks, seating, lighting, and presentation...those things doom theater-going for me personally. It would be more of a concern for the more rural areas, like the one mentioned in the article, where entertainment options are limited.
     

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