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Cutting the Cord on Cable - WSJ article Jan 7 2012

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by stuberman, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. stuberman

    stuberman Member

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    The Wall Street Journal had an interesting article on how TV is changing, including a side panel that discussed alternatives to cable service. I was a bit surprised that Google TV was never even mentioned by name.

    3 Ways to Go Cable-Free

    1. WATCH LIVE TV...FREE

    2. GET INTO THE STREAM OF THINGS

    There are several products that make it easy to access video content through the Web on your living room television without the need for a computer. For the most part, they're all easy to use and deliver a huge, simple to browse selection of movies and TV shows through applications like Netflix, Hulu and iTunes.

    Samsung D8000 3D LED Smart TV
    For clutter-haters who don't want to deal with having any more boxes in the living room, upgrade to the D8000. It's only 1.2 inches thick, has a gorgeous picture surrounded by a barely-there frame and Hulu, Netflix, YouTube and other services are baked right in. Finding the content you want is easy—the flip side of its remote is a full Qwerty keyboard. From $2,700,
    Apple TV
    If you get most of your movies and shows from the iTunes store, this is the easiest way to shop it from your flat screen instead of your MacBook. The only other major streaming service is Netflix, but it makes up for that with access to MLB.TV, NHL Game Center,
    NBA.com
    (to watch live games on those channels, you'll need a subscription to each) and what's probably the most extensive collection of digital pay-for shows and movies.
    Boxee Box
    It has Netflix, Vudu and MLB.TV, but where the Boxee excels is in finding free shows and movies from (legal) sources you might not have thought to look at before. All you have to do is search for the show—the remote has a full Qwerty keyboard—and if it's on the Internet, Boxee will find it. There's a wide variety of channels to explore as well. Later this month, you'll be able to add a live TV tuner to the box for $49. $180,
    boxee.tv
    Sony PlayStation 3
    Yes, it's a gaming console. But for those who pull their hair out over sluggish, molasses-like user interfaces (I'm not sure how I'm not bald yet), the PS3 is one of the snappiest streaming solutions available. Browsing for stuff on Netflix, Hulu, Vudu and the PlayStation's own video store is lightning quick. It's also one of the best Blu-ray/DVD players you can buy. You remember those round shiny discs, right?
    Xbox 360 Kinect
    The Xbox can stream for-pay movies from the growing Zune Video Marketplace as well as content from Netflix, Hulu Plus, HBO Go and ESPN, but what sets it apart from everything else attached to your TV are the innovative gesture commands. You can browse through movies by swiping at them "Minority Report"-style. And voice controls—pause and play just by saying it—mean you might never have to press a button again. From $300,
    xbox.com
    Roku LT
    Roku is a pioneer in bringing streaming video to TVs. The hockey-puck-size box was developed specifically to stream Netflix but has grown to include over 500 channels including Hulu Plus and Amazon Instant Video. The LT is Roku's most affordable option and outputs video at 720p. Slightly more expensive variants get you a better picture and the option to play games like "Angry Birds" using the remote as a controller. Later this year, expect the Roku Streaming Stick, a thumb-size device that plugs into the back of your TV for a more minimal look. $50,
    roku.com
    3. PLUG INTO THE WORLD WIDE WEB
    Many televisions and streaming boxes provide some sort of rudimentary Web browser. Unfortunately a lot of sites where you would normally visit to watch videos are blocked when accessed on these devices. The work-around? Simply hook up a computer to the TV. With the right wires, you should be able to connect your laptop easily enough. But if you want a more elegant and permanent setup, consider these two gadgets.

    Apple Mac Mini
    Hard to believe, but this metal block that's as thick as a stack of cocktail napkins is a full-fledged Mac. It's designed to be unobtrusive: The fan is super quiet, it attaches to your television with a single HDMI cable—just like a DVD player, but prettier—and there's only one power cord, so you don't have to figure out how to hide another power brick behind your credenza. It can play everything you throw at it without any jitters or stutters and, for home-theater enthusiasts, it supports eight channels of digital audio. From $599,
    apple.com
    Netgear PTVU1000
    Already have a PC laptop but don't want to physically tether it to your flat screen every time you fire up an episode of "Downton Abbey"? This device from Netgear lets you wirelessly stream whatever's on your laptop to your television in high definition. Just leave the small receiver attached to your TV, plug a small USB transmitter into your laptop and it'll automatically start beaming your small screen to your big screen. $130,
    netgear.com

    Excerpts from Cutting the Cord on Cable
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012
  2. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I am also very surprised the WSJ article doesn't include Google TV and if these new Google TV boxes turn the world upside down, the article will look rather silly very quickly.
     
  3. Cygnus

    Cygnus New Member

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    I don't see GTV turning the world upside down but it will be much more successful than last year. Lets not forget the hype that will come from apple's TV and their updated ATV box.
     
  4. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    No, everybody is going to see the light this year and Google TV will take off like a rocket as soon as the new products are released.;)
     
  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    As long as GTV has the HDMI overlays and the interaction with cable TV - I don't think it's officially referred to as a cord-cutting device. Rather it's seen as something that enhances the cable experience in addition to bringing more online content.

    A Roku doesn't have any HDMI interaction with a cable box - as such people probably view it as more of a pure cable-cutting option. Of course there are ways to use a GTV without cable if one desires. Google has stated that they don't intend for GTV to be a cord-cutting device.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012
  6. halox

    halox New Member

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    Yes - Google has spent a lot of time (with version 2.0) trying to dispel the idea of it being a cord-cutting device.
     
  7. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I am the only one that uses Google TV as part of the solution for cutting the cord but now that I think about it, you are right, it is definitely being marketed as being designed to be used with a cable or satellite box. I am sure that is the reason it wasn't mentioned.
     
  8. halox

    halox New Member

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    Funny thing is, once we all cut the cord on cable ... guess what's going to happen to all our cheap "unlimited, all you can consume" broadband internet plans. Tier-city, baby. ;)
     

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