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Chrome For Android To Be Faster, More Efficient By The End Of This Year

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Chrome for Android to be faster, more efficient by the end of this year - Liliputing (click for full article)

    by Brad Linder - Jan. 14, 2013

    -- Chrome for Android has come a long way in a short period of time, but Google's planning on making it even better by the end of this year. Over on the Blink Google Group, engineer Eric Seidel has shed some light on Google's goals for the browser in 2014.

    The overarching goals won't come as a shock. By the end of this year, Chrome for Android should be faster, more responsive, and more efficient than ever.


    Read more at: Chrome for Android to be faster, more efficient by the end of this year - Liliputing
     
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  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    https://groups.google.com/a/chromium.org/forum/m/#!topic/blink-dev/Z5OzwYh3Wfk/discussion (click for full blog)


    Blink 2014 Goal Brainstorming
    Jan 10 - Eric Seidel


    Some of the web platform team at Google recently met to plan for 2014. I'd like to share some of our thoughts with the larger Blink community and solicit your own.


    Web usage continues to shift from desktop to mobile. Yet the mobile web remains far from reaching its potential -- in part because web engines (e.g. Blink) are not nearly as good on performance-constrained devices as they need to be. To be successful on mobile, Blink must exit 2014 much more mobile-awesome.


    Primarily this means improving Blink's performance on less-powerful devices. Blink should be hands-down the best performing mobile web engine. We must achieve:


    -- Constant improvement to our core metrics
    -- Smoothness (scrolling & 60hz animation)
    -- Input Responsiveness
    -- Initial Load Time
    -- #1 on (credible/realistic) mobile web benchmarks
    -- Reduced memory consumption
    -- Lowest power consumption


    Additionally we need to continue to improve the mobile web platform itself -- make it easy for authors to ship fast, awesome web apps. In 2014 we plan to:


    Read more at: https://groups.google.com/a/chromium.org/forum/m/#!topic/blink-dev/Z5OzwYh3Wfk/discussion
     
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  3. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    I don't have any technical understanding of how Chrome works within Android but based on my Google TV experience, it appears to me that memory management issues are the big problem. If I just use Chrome, jumping around various sites, clicking here and there, it will crash and without fail when I check, RAM is cluttered and the cause of the issue. Is that going to be improved with the new Chrome or is a greater amount of RAM the only solution? I know not to use Google TV Chrome like that now, it is one web page at a time and careful management to avoid crashes but that isn't how people want to use these devices. I don't know if the Google TV Chrome browser will benefit from the upcoming Chrome improvements although I hope that will happen.
     
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  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I believe GTV will run much better on Jellybean OS and beyond. I don't think the current GTV hardware was well suited to run a full desktop browser with Flash. It doesn't help matters that the browser on GTV Honeycomb devices is an outdated version of Chrome 11. As the GTV devices were designed at launch (both hardware & software) - 1 GB of RAM was not enough for consistent smooth operation.

    The thing is the hardware will run better after the Jellybean update - however IMO viewing a mobile browser on a big-screen TV is not ideal.

    Make your mobile site 70 per cent faster | Mobile | Creative Bloq
     
  5. retroben

    retroben Active Member

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    I bet it would run almost flawlessly,Flash and all,if they would have updated the browser to the latest Linux Desktop Chrome,and the latest version of Flash for Linux (11.2)
    I really wish they would just talk Adobe into returning to Android to at least port NPAPI Flash along with offline SWF support for use with NDK JellyBean and up.

    Hey CatfishRivers,what does the scouter say about your posts level?
     
  6. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    The scouter? What's that?
     
  7. retroben

    retroben Active Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
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  8. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Chrome for Android, iOS can now cut your bandwidth usage by 50 percent - Liliputing (click for full article)

    by Brad Linder - Jan. 15, 2014

    -- Google Chrome for Android and iOS is a fast, simple, and powerful web browser for phones and tablets. Now there may be another reason to use it: Google is giving users the option of enabling data compression that could reduce data usage by up to 50 percent.


    The feature has been available in Chrome beta for almost a year, and now it's available in the stable version of Chrome for mobile.


    By routing your internet traffic through Google's servers, the company can compress images and other data before sending them to your device. That cuts down on bandwidth to your phone. While it could speed up page load times, the biggest benefit may be that users with data caps will be able to visit about twice as many websites per month before hitting those caps.


    Don't want all of your traffic to go through Google's servers? No problem. The feature isn't enabled by default. You'll have to turn it on by sliding the toggle for "reduce data usage" in Chrome's bandwidth management settings.


    Chrome isn't the first mobile web browser to offer data compression. Opera has offered similar technology for years.


    The latest version of Chrome for iOS also adds built-in support for Google Translate, and Chrome for Android now lets you create home screen shortcuts to websites with just a few taps thanks to a new "add to homescreen" button from the drop-down menu.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2014
  9. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    According to the following article the Dolphin browser plans on entering and competing in the smart TV market:

    Mobile Browser Dolphin Hits 100M Installs, Launches Innovation Lab Focused On Smart Devices | TechCrunch

    From the article:

    **The team is currently working on several projects, including a partnership with a smart TV manufacturer that will be announced in March, and integrating Dolphin's browser with Chromecast, which will allow users to browse the web on their TV sets with Flash support.

    "The whole idea behind Dolphin Labs is how to combine the Internet of Things with the Dolphin experience. We want to highlight the ability of users to control Dolphin with voice and gesture," says Edith Yeung, Dolphin's vice president of business development. "We want to make it easy and really fast to browse the Internet with any smart devices you have."

    Once Dolphin is available for smart TVs, for example, users will be able to navigate the browser on their television sets by speaking into their smartphones.**
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2014

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