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Chrome Apps 101: Video Shows Google's Vision Of Future Web Apps On Mobile & Desktop

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Dec 9, 2013.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Chrome Apps 101: Video shows Google?s vision of future web apps on mobile and desktop ? Tech News and Analysis (click for full article)

    by Kevin C. Tofel - Dec. 9, 2013

    SUMMARY:
    Can Google Chrome Apps rival native software on desktops and mobiles? The company thinks so and is creating the tools necessary for developers to build such apps. This video shows them off along with software that runs on multiple devices and platforms.


    Develop Chrome Apps on desktop/mobile, distribute and profit - Chrome Dev Summit 2013 (Joe Marini):
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Google emulates 1980s-era Amiga computer in Chrome | Internet & Media - CNET News (click for full article)

    by Stephen Shankland - Dec. 12, 2013

    Summary: Google's Portable Native Client technology gives a new Web-based lease on life for an old operating system and the games it could run.


    -- The Amiga 500 lives again -- in Google's browser.

    Google developer Christian Stefansen on Thursday resurrected a version of the venerable computer system from the 1980s in the form of a Web app that runs in Chrome. Forty-year-olds who want to relive their childhoods or younger people who want to see just how hard their elders had it can visit the Amiga 500 emulator for Chrome online, boot the machine, and play some games.

    Chrome emulates the old operating system by a Chrome-specific version of the Open Source Universal Amiga Emulator. Stefansen brought its 400,000 lines of code, written in the C programming language originally, to the Portable Native Client (PNaCl) foundation built into Chrome.

    The Native Client technology runs software written to run on a particular processor at close to the speeds that native software runs. The approach gives software more direct access to a computer's hardware , but it also adds security restrictions to prevent people from downloading malware from the Web that would take advantage of that power.


    Read more at: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57...puter-in-chrome/?part=rss&subj=news&tag=title
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2013
  4. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Mozilla?s Asm.js Gets Another Step Closer To Native Performance | TechCrunch (click for full article)

    by Frederic Lardinois - Dec. 21, 2013

    -- Mozilla's asm.js is a strict subset of JavaScript that Firefox can run significantly faster than regular JavaScript code. Thanks to the so-called OdinMonkey module for Firefox's built-in JavaScript engine, asm.js code was running at about 2x native speed in March and this week, the organization announced that it's now running most benchmarks at just 1.5x slower than native or better.


    While Google is betting on Native Client to allow web apps to execute native compiled code in the browser, Mozilla is betting on its ability to run JavaScript at near-native speeds, too. While they approach this problem from very different angles, both Google, through Native Client, and Mozilla, through its Emscripten LLVM-to-JavaScript compiler, allow developers to write their code in C or C++ and then run it in the browser.


    Given that most game engines are written in C or C++, the focus for asm.js has mostly been on gaming too. Indeed, one of the first public asm.js demos Mozilla showed was Epic's Unreal Engine 3 running natively in the browser.


    Read more at: http://techcrunch.com/2013/12/21/mozillas-asm-js-gets-another-step-closer-to-native-performance/


    Engineering teams at Mozilla and Epic ported Unreal Engine 3 to the Web:
     
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  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Google launches tools to run Chrome apps natively on Macs, Android and more ? Tech News and Analysis (click for full article)

    by Kevin C. Tofel - Jan. 28, 2014

    -- Following up on news it made public at last May's I/O developer event, Google on Tuesday launched a toolset to bring Chrome apps to other platforms, including smartphones and tablets. Based on Apache Cordova, the tool is basically a native application wrapper that fits around the Chrome app so it can be distributed through either the Google Play Store or Apple's App Store.

    An example image shows a task management Chrome app - built with HTML, JavaScript and CSS - that appears like a native app on a Mac or Android device:


    See more at: http://gigaom.com/2014/01/28/google-launches-tools-to-run-chrome-apps-on-macs-android-and-more/
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
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    Chromium Blog: Run Chrome Apps on mobile using Apache Cordova (click for full Chromium blog)


    January 28, 2014

    -- In September we introduced a new breed of Chrome Apps that work offline by default and act like native applications on the host operating system. These Chrome Apps are currently available on all desktop platforms. Today we're expanding their reach to mobile platforms with an early developer preview of a toolchain based on Apache Cordova, an open-source mobile development framework for building native mobile apps using HTML, CSS and JavaScript.


    The toolchain wraps your Chrome App with a native application shell and enables you to distribute your app via Google Play and the Apple App Store. We provide a simple developer workflow for packaging a Chrome App natively for mobile platforms. You can run your Chrome App on a device or emulator using the command-line or an IDE. Alternatively, you can use the Chrome Apps Developer Tool to run your app on an Android device without the need to install an IDE or the mobile platform's SDK.


    See more at: http://blog.chromium.org/2014/01/run-chrome-apps-on-mobile-using-apache.html
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014

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