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Can Cable Block the GoogleTV Revolution? by Matthew Lasar ARSTechnica

Discussion in 'Google TV News' started by alphawave7, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. alphawave7

    alphawave7 Moderator Staff Member

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    "Behind the scenes at the Federal Communications Commission, a quiet war is being waged over the future of television. It isn’t getting as many headlines as net neutrality or the Comcast/NBCU merger, but the debate is nearly as important. It’s about how far Google, Sony, and their allies can take their Google TV system. In their bid to get the FCC to help Google TV and similar devices, “Sony/Google are asking the Commission to ignore copyright, patent, trademark, contract privity, licensing, and other legal rights and limitations that have been thoroughly documented,” the National Cable and Telecommunications Association (NCTA) warned last Wednesday.

    What is NCTA talking about? The trade association is trying to set limits on how easy it will be for devices like Google TV to access pay TV content and reassemble it into something that will reconfigure both television and the internet.

    That’s at the heart of the FCC’s proposal for an AllVid system, which Google very loudly supports. AllVid doesn’t exist yet, but the idea is to mandate an industry-wide gadget that you could plug into your broadband router and connect to your cable TV provider, then watch online video and pay channels through a variety of AllVid-friendly devices. Not surprisingly, Google and Sony love this idea, because it could transform the Google TV from just a neat product into a revolution.


    Big cable hates the proposal, because that revolution could leave multi-video program distributors (MVPDs), if not in the dust, at least working in a far more competitive video environment. But the AllVid proposal faces real technical challenges that have yet to be worked out."

    Read whole story: SOURCE
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2011
  2. Megtv

    Megtv New Member

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    I guess what I don't understand is the cable companies don't have the copyright on these TV show, they are owned by the networks such as ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox etc... these same networks let you watch their shows online where you are forced to watch their commercials (remember that is how they make money). When those same shows air on cable many people have DVRs that allow them to record and then fast forward through those commercials. In my mind it seems that it would be more beneficial for the networks to allow GTV viewers so that they could sell more advertising... if you were an advertiser wouldn't you want to pay for your ads to be placed where there was more of a chance that people would actually watch them rather than fast forward through.
     
  3. tomcrown1

    tomcrown1 Member

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    Your missing one point, cable and satellite companies pay program providers a Hugh fee for their content. The fear is that if ITV takes off this source of revenue will be lost to program providers.
     
  4. towboy123

    towboy123 New Member

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    Google TV was intended to be in Addition to A Pay for service not a way to rip off cable companies. There needs to be some kind of login that ties back to your Service provider to prove that you are already paying for this content. There is zero reasons that after I pay $150 a month to Dish Network that anybody should be allowed to block me from internet content based on what device I try to access it from
     
  5. alphawave7

    alphawave7 Moderator Staff Member

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    GTV can be used by folks that don't sub to ANY provider, as I do/don't. This fact has nothing to do with the networks blocking GTV, and everything to do with controlling the ad space and revenue model they seem to have stuck themselves with.
     
  6. towboy123

    towboy123 New Member

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    While it can be used without a subscription it intent was to be used with a subscription service. My point is that I am already paying the networks for their content so there is no point in blocking me. To the users without a pay for subscription I can understand the networks wanting money from you.
     
  7. Sebrina

    Sebrina New Member

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    I'm new to this forum and Google TV in general having had my Logitech unit for 4 days now. I'd just like to touch up on what you said, I too am a premium TV subscriber (Directv), the reason why Comcast and big cable/satellite companies don't like Google TV is two fold. One obvious reason is freeloading, but the other is less obvious like you I already pay out the gazoo for content and we both should get what we pay for wherever we want, but these companies have much more to lose by letting us lose out on smart TVs. It's called advertising! See network advertising would go down the tube. There is just as much money to be made in advertising as there is in subscriptions. If Comcast and company let smart TVs have content for their subscribers on other platforms advertisers will follow and there's billions of dollars to be made. Google knows this, don't think Google is fighting for your rights they're fighting for a piece of the media advertising cash cow which they of all people know is nothing to sneeze about. Expect to see some changes soon or at least by Google I/O and they'll get whoever will listen on board, but the big media providers I forsee will fight this to the bloody end. As far as options Google will hand these to you on a silver plate and make the platform open it's in nothing but in their best interest to get as many of us watching TV through THEIR Smart TVs with built in text and full screen media ads/commercials as possible.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  8. towboy123

    towboy123 New Member

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    Thing about it is I am forced to watch the add when I visit online. On my DVR it s all recorded and commercials are all skipped. They have a better chance at getting ads in front of me when I watch online
     
  9. alphawave7

    alphawave7 Moderator Staff Member

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    The networks want to ensure their adverts don't get stripped from their content..and no streaming service in their right mind would stockpile programs on the blade servers WITH adverts built in...way too much work. The networks will need to settle eventually on a plan to inject commercial (ala HULU+) in a timely/relevant manner (commercials have a life span-think McRib! LOL!) into the stream provided by these servers, and it's not trivial from ANY perspective: advertisers remain unconvinced, networks aren't either (nor helping their supporters to be so), Google et al. wants it's control over ad space within the stream as well, content delivery networks (CDNs) go through a bunch of techie hurdles to pull off this feat (possibly at greater expense than prepaid content like Netflix/Amazon), and it's only the consumer that is demanding this change...and who are we! :p It will happen..it IS happening, but IPTV is still a nascent process growing quickly, owing to our demand to make it so. We have to wait for the content, ads, deals and the tech to catch up to our demand, unfortunately.
     

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