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Cable Companies Not Likely To Jump On Motorola Box With Google TV

Discussion in 'Google TV General Discussion' started by CatfishRivers, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I tend to agree with this article that Comcast will be reluctant to allow Google TV onto it's set top boxes. However I still think Google TV can be successful - just keep the prices reasonable, have a good upgrade to android 3.1, open up android market, improve hardware, secure more content deals. Google TV won't be saved by Motorola acquisition - FierceOnlineVideo
     
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  2. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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  3. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    I think both authors have rather limited understanding of the respective market and technology. Their articles suggest that Android / Google TV is an all or nothing offering. Neither writers appears to understand the concept nor benefit of open-sourced open-platform amd how it can be customized to suit the exact needs of the cable provider. It wouldn't be difficult at all to remove components from Android to disallow unwarranted functionality. A prime example is Simpati who has removed Android Market on their devices and many of the default Google applications.

    Channel line providers have finally realize that they can no longer rest on the old methods of content delivery if they want to keep their subscribers. These companies have embraced modern technology to expand on their content delivery methodology. For example, Time Warner's TW Cable App, Comcast and Xfinity TV, Cablevision with Optimum, and Cox's TV Everywhere. Each one of these providers realizes these opportunities as way to enhance the value of video subscription packages and potentially expand audience reach; as well as to provide a disincentive for consumers to "cut the cord."

    One of the challenges in deploying these services is the diversity of hardware and software on these set-top boxes. Aside from infrastructure issues, this is why parts of these programs are only available in certain areas. Let's use Cisco's Scientific Atlanta Explorer 8300 set-top box as an example. This is one of the more common DVRs which have been deployed in different regions by Comcast, Cox, Time Warner, and Cablevision. Depending on your carrier provider and location, the operating system deployed on this one box can be Sara, Passport Echo, Navigator, or Mystero. Each one offering different levels of functionality which impedes deployment for these new services.

    Adopting Android as an open-platform will benefit these cable providers in the same way it helped the mobile operators. This will help them unify the operating systems across the diverse hardware to support rapid deployment. They will also benefit from lower software bill of material while having a greater flexibility to customize and differentiate their product offerings.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011
  4. lucas710

    lucas710 New Member

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    "A prime example is Sprint who has removed Android Market on their devices and replaced it with their own curated Sprint market"

    What devices did they do this on? Android market is the most important part of Android OS, I don't think Google would let them do this. I own the Evo 3D and have the newest Android market running. Sprint Market, cant find any info on that.


    "Adopting Android as an open-platform will benefit these cable providers in the same way it helped the mobile operators. This will help them unify the operating systems across the diverse hardware to support rapid deployment. They will also benefit from lower software bill of material while having a greater flexibility to customize and differentiate their product offerings."

    Why would Google want to attach them selves to a dying cable industry, the internet is rising up and Google is on top.
     
  5. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    I may have remembered the wrong carrier but it has been done. I will redact and update the carrier name when I can find out exactly who has done it. However, the focus remains the same Google provides Android as an open-sourced open-platform, they do not have the authority to dictate how an OEM decides to use it on their device. Here is an excerpt from the Open Handset Alliance regarding the matter: Android FAQ | Open Handset Alliance

    While there is a rapid decline in the paid subscribers, there is still a need for linear programming from broadcast, cable and satellite industry. One of the reason is scalability; linear programming is still the best way to simultaneously distribute content to a very large audience. The internet infrastructure just isn't ready if everyone decided to "cut the cord" all at once and simultaneously stream content. It is going to take quite sometime before the internet's infrastructure could sustain the bandwidth necessary to service that many people at one time. So, there's plenty of time to take advantage of the business opportunities while the industry is still alive.

    Besides, Google is very committed in growing the Android ecosystem to any device. Here are some quotes which from the webcast announcing the Google's acquisition or Motorola Mobility.

    The entire webcast can be heard here: Sard Verbinnen - Events & Presentations
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011

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