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Blast from the Past - DVR

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by guest, Oct 12, 2013.

  1. guest

    guest Active Member

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    LAS VEGAS, Jan. 7, 1999 — WebTV Networks, Inc. and EchoStar Communications Corp. at CES today announced the Microsoft® WebTV Network ™ Plus service for satellite and the EchoStar Model 7100 satellite receiver, the world's first Internet TV service available through satellite. Scheduled to be available this spring, the combined service and product will revolutionize the TV viewing experience by integrating the DISH Network's digital satellite television programming with the Internet TV experience from WebTV Networks, including digital video recording (DVR), advanced electronic program guide (EPG), broadband data delivery and video games.


    WebTV Networks and EchoStar Communications Introduce First Internet TV Satellite Product and Service


    Consumer digital video recorders ReplayTV and TiVo were launched at the 1999 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, USA. Microsoft also demonstrated a unit with DVR capability, but this did not become available until the end of 1999 for full DVR features in Dish Network's DISHplayer receivers. TiVo shipped their first units on March 31, 1999. ReplayTV won the "Best of Show" award in the video category[3] with Netscape co-founder Marc Andreessen as an early investor and board member,[4] but TiVo was more successful commercially. While early legal action by media companies forced ReplayTV to remove many features such as automatic commercial skip and the sharing of recordings over the Internet,[5] newer devices have steadily regained these functions while adding complementary abilities, such as recording onto DVDs and programming and remote control facilities using PDAs, networked PCs, and Web browsers.


    At the 1999 CES, Dish Network demonstrated the hardware that would later have DVR capability with the assistance of Microsoft software.[6] which also included WebTV Networks internet TV.[6] By the end of 1999 the Dishplayer had full DVR capabilities and within a year, over 200,000 units were sold.


    Digital video recorder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  2. guest

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    Can someone recommend an inexpensive, "entry-level" Digital Video Recorder? It would be used to record TV programs. Wikipedia mentions a "dual-tuner DVR", which allows one to record one program while viewing another. Does that feature double the price?


    Some products are listed as "DVD Player and Recorder". Does that mean that if you buy just a DVR, then you would need a separate DVD Player. I already own a DVD Player. As hard as I try, I can't make it record (lol)!


    This DVR on Amazon at $150.78 looks interesting. Does anyone have an opinion on it? Amazon.com: Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR High Definition Personal Video Recorder: Electronics
     
  3. ChrisG8

    ChrisG8 Well-Known Member

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    The Hauppage 1212 has component video output, no HDMI so if you want to use it with Google TV, forget it, it is a pathetic choice. If you don't care that it won't work with Google TV, I don't have a clue but know I wouldn't bother with it for recording OTA in any event.
     
  4. guest

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    So if I don't live in one of the eight countries in which Tivo operates, but own a Google TV, what do you suggest be used to record cable TV programming. International availability of the TiVo service Though I haven't studied patent law, I would find it hard to believe that nearly every national legislature on the planet has had its hands tied due to the "Tivo Patent" and are prosecuting would-be Tivo clones. It's more likely that the Tivo patents are unenforceable in the majority of countries on the planet. I don't suppose that you'd even admit that Tivo clones exist. Nor that their use violates no law when used in a country in which no patents have been granted to Tivo. Tivo would like to be the "master of the universe", with its patents in hand, but, I suspect, it's only the master of eight countries in that universe. Can anyone recommend a good Tivo clone? For a non-U.S. user, of course.
     

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