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Are networks being greedy?

Discussion in 'Google TV General Discussion' started by networkbuilder, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. networkbuilder

    networkbuilder Member

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    Google TV Launches with Little Network Support
    Networks fear audiences will stop watching traditional broadcast option

    October 5, 2010</SPAN> | By Anthony Agnello
    Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) revealed their launch plans for Google TV yesterday after months of speculation over when televisions and set top boxes carrying Google's new software would ship. Over the course of the next few weeks, consumers will be able to purchase different models of Sony's (NYSE: SNE) high-definition televisions, including the new Sony Internet TV, and Blu-ray players that come pre-loaded with Google's new software. They will also have access to Google TV through a new set top box from Logitech (NASDAQ: LOGI). No prices have been announced for the new devices equipped with Google TV, though.

    The other mystery surrounding Google's new service that unifies both regular television delivery with streaming Internet television is what kind of support from television content producers Google TV would have when the service is finally in people's living rooms. Many of television's most powerful broadcasters, both network and cable, have expressed concerns over how content will be organized on Google TV. Now that Google has announced their launch plans for the service, it appears that they were not able to quell those fears. While Google TV will have support from successful like Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX), who provide a wealth of archival television programming via a subscription service, and Amazon.com (NASDAQ: AMZN), who offer television downloads and rentals at fixed prices, they will not have the direct support of major television networks at launch. Every major network, including, CBS (NYSE: CBS), News Corp's (NYSE: NWS) Fox, and Disney (NYSE: DIS) ABC, will not be supporting Google TV for the foreseeable future. General Electric's (NYSE: GE) CNBC will offer services through Google TV, but flagship network NBC will, like the other networks, not be participating during Google TV's initial period.

    The reason the networks are anxious about Google TV is because they believe that having both Internet-based television options on the same device as regular broadcast and cable-based on demand services will lead to cannibalized business. The fear is that audiences will stop watching the traditional broadcast options and cost television companies millions in lost advertising dollars. It's a legitimate concern. While much of Google TV's appeal is in the ability to enjoy Web-features like social networking through Twitter, chat services, and information search options while watching TV, the software will also allow users to search the entire Internet for television programming.

    Here's the networks' nightmare scenario: You want to watch NBC's 30 Rock. Rather than watch the show during its Thursday airtime or via Comcast's (NASDAQ: CMCSA) on demand programming, you use Google TV's television search option. The search results give you these options: watch select ad-supported episodes via NBC's partially owned Hulu Internet TV service, watch all previous seasons with no ads via Netflix if you're a subscriber, or a pirated, ad-free version available illegally through a video hosting website like Megaupload.com. You can see why this would worry NBC and make the other networks nervous. According to a report in The New York Times, network executives want Google to either share their own advertising revenue from contextual ads laid over Google TV's programming or to aggressively monitor and shut down illegal hosting sources. Easier said than done on both counts.

    Google does have some strong initial support from Time Warner (NYSE: TWX), which is surprising given how outspoken Time Warner has been against Apple Inc.'s (NASDAQ: AAPL) new Apple TV and that company's aggressively priced 99-cent television rentals. Time Warner properties Turner Broadcasting and HBO are both working with Google TV to optimize their Internet programming for the software. Turner channels like TNT, TBS, and others are optimizing their websites so instant streaming will look good on living televisions, while HBO will be allowing access to its new Internet on demand service HBOGo through Google TV. Support from one of cable TV's biggest content and service providers is a great start for Google, but they have a long way to go before they can convince other established providers that Internet TV is the business of the future.

    credit for this article Google (GOOG) Stock - Google TV | InvestorPlace

    what do you guys think??? networks just being greedy???

    I personally wouldn't miss my Vampire Diaries on Thursdays just because I could watch it at a later date. I think the networks need to grasp and adapt to the way of the future.
     
  2. alphawave7

    alphawave7 Moderator Staff Member

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    The main networks aren't relevant anymore. They remind me of MPAA/RIAA desperately grasping onto a failing, outdated business model. We all want ala carte, time shifting, and quality production...surprisingly the big three are among the worst in giving us what we want. Screw'em, I say! :D
     
  3. HamDog

    HamDog Member

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    I'm a bit confused here as to how all this will work. I think you can still go to the network's websites using Google TV and watch the network shows for free (using the web browser). It just can't be presented in a Google TV specific format?

    Can't wait to get my hands on a Google TV device to really test it out. Not saying I'll keep it, unless it can really provide unrestricted Internet access and browsing.
     
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  4. zgruven

    zgruven New Member

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    Isnt DISH CRAPWORK also on board with google tv??? That is the MAJOR DOWN FALL FOR GOOGLE TV!!!!
     
  5. networkbuilder

    networkbuilder Member

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    I'm praying that Direct Tv will get on board with them.... I think that the Networks just have not seen the true benefit in it for them yet. Its hard to blame them at this point of the game. Time will tell I guess.
     
  6. Bluen25

    Bluen25 Member

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    I don't think the networks have a choice. If they display content online, Google TV will be able to search and view it. The networks listed on the google.com/TV website are just networks that have participated with Google to create optimized websites for viewing on large TVs. All other networks web content should be visible. I for one would rather the networks leave their websites alone. I have a feeling that the optimized network websites that the Google TV will default to will be dumbed down from their original websites. I'm sure we will be able to find a way around these in the future as this is an Android platform.
     
  7. PhatboyC

    PhatboyC Member

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    I though they mean having an app that browses their website. If you go with chrome instead then it the same than any other pc.
     
  8. Karen

    Karen New Member

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    Network TV lost much of it's 'live' viewing audience as soon as DVR's hit the market. I don't see how they can figure this is much different except it will be easier (for the viewer) not to have to ffwd through the commercials. The more difficult they make it for us to watch their programming, the less we WILL watch.
     
  9. alphawave7

    alphawave7 Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep..that, and the over-reliance on contrived cop shows and 'reality' programming. :p
     
  10. Karen

    Karen New Member

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    LOL, alphawave7! I take it you are not into 'The Donald'.
     
  11. alphawave7

    alphawave7 Moderator Staff Member

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    LOL! Never seen it. You could rattle off literally dozens of popular shows I've never seen. For example, I've never seen an ep of Friends, or Cheers...only snippets when I channel-surfed. The only 'canned-laughter' sitcom I could tolerate was Drew Carey, it was one of the least insulting comedies I came across (Third Rock, and Arrested Development [no laugh track]) were others. I've never seen any complete 'reality' programs...but saw a few minutes of Osbournes and VH-1's Bands Reunited...until I sensed they too were contrived. If I felt my chain was being yanked, I switched the channel. Coming up on 5 years without regular tv. :p
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010
  12. networkbuilder

    networkbuilder Member

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    alphawave7............ what do you watch then???? not being sarcastic or anything, I'm just really curious what you watch.

    Me.... I'm not looking for the absolute truth, or just the news.... I watch tv for its entertainment values.....
     
  13. alphawave7

    alphawave7 Moderator Staff Member

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    We got into Netflix in a big way, and built a huge queue, and I realised I no longer needed to rely on my $130/mo DTV with DirecTiVo's to get the content I wanted most often..Netflix carried most of it. Sherlock Holmes and Poirot was on PBS, also shared on A&E, and BBCAmerica had other mysteries we love (Prime Suspect, Inspector Morse, Big fans of Robson Green (Touching Evil/Trust/Wire In The Blood-which will leave you sleepless, it is so chilling), we also like the Merchant/Ivory period pieces..and just about anything that is well-acted with an actual story to relate. This excludes just about everything on commercial tv...I find most of it boring or insulting, hyped pacing and chain-yanking clones spawned by previous shows. With the plethora of really good material out there, it pays to be choosier about what you spend your free time consuming. :)
     
  14. Karen

    Karen New Member

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    I have to agree with networkbuilder (can't stand your avatar... makes my sides hurt!) to a degree. Everyone has different tastes (and motives) for what they watch. Sometimes I just need to be entertained - or have someone/something to bash.
     

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