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Adobe gives up on Flash

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by eferz, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    Scoop du jour

     
  2. zen2go

    zen2go New Member

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    Somewhere Steve Jobs is smirking...
     
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  3. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    So how will this effect Google TV? Personally I'd like to see more sites in HTML5.
     
  4. chicha29

    chicha29 New Member

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  5. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I have 2 questions about the YouTube HTML5 player.

    1) I noticed that pausing a HTML5 video doesn't induce that lighter shaded progress bar (at the bottom of the video) - it's the lead bar that moves ahead of the darker bar and is present in the Flash videos. This I believe indicates how much of the video is stored in the browser cache. I sometimes pause the Flash videos to let them buffer (because I have a slow internet speed). Pausing HTML 5 videos doesn't seem to make them buffer (as it does with Flash videos). Is there any way to make HTML5 videos buffer?

    2) I notice that HTML5 videos have an option to set (adjust) playback speed. I tried the different speeds but I didn't seem to notice much difference. What would be the optimal speed setting if I have a slow download speed? My internet speed is about 1.5 mbps down. Generally this is fine for standard definition videos - but sometimes I like to 'manage' a video a bit (by pausing to buffer) - and that allows me to watch in 720P.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2011
  6. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I noticed that YouTube has a beta program called "feather". It is a specicially designed low latency version of YouTube. They claim that your browser will actually use less bytes through feather. In exchange some of the features have been removed. For example I don't see the thumbs up, thumbs down votes in Feather. But they still have the comments.

    It seems as though videos load faster for me and I get less of the spinning wheel pauses by using feather.

    ------------------------------------------------------------

    ""Feather" Beta

    This is an opt-in beta for "Feather" support on YouTube. The "Feather" project is intended to serve YouTube video watch pages with the lowest latency possible. It achieves this by severely limiting the features available to the viewer and making use of advanced web techniques for reducing the total amount of bytes downloaded by the browser. It is a work in progress and may not work for all videos.


    Your comments will help us improve and perfect the mixtures we're working on. So jump in, play around, and send your feedback directly to the brains behind the scenes."



    YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.
    (click for YouTube feather beta)
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2011
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  7. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    Nobody knows for sure. Android is the OS which Google TV is based on so there could be a relation since it is still considered a "mobile OS". Although, Adobe hasn't posted anything yet specifying the details. I've been checking this page regularly, "Optimize Flash content for mobile browsers | Adobe Developer Connection". But, there's no news yet. It could be a hoax or rumor.

    Edit: Nevermind -- This was posted.

     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2011
  8. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be too worried about Google TV this early. We should at least expect an update to 11.1 if they live up to what Danny Winokur wrote:

     
  9. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    I thought about this a little further - and considering that Logitech is discontinuing the Revue - this news about Flash IMO will extend the useful life of the Revue.

    This is because currently the official Flash versions are not able to be downloaded directly (from Adobe) with the Revue - but are only available through official GTV updates.
     
  10. sparkyscott21

    sparkyscott21 Moderator Staff Member

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    It makes one wonder if all this speculation has been brewing for some time now, without any of us knowing anything
    from behind the scenes..
     
  11. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    It's like a jungle. Sometimes it makes me wonder, how I keep from going under.
     
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  12. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Adobe delivers a blow to Google TV by pulling Flash [UPDATE: Adobe responds]


    Well IMO the jest of this article implies that the next generation of Google TV hardware won't have a full web browser. Rather GTV will just have a bunch of apps. Kind of like the Roku and most other Smart TVs now.

    That would be a shame IMO. I'm not interested in a little hand-held remote with a few tiny buttons (designed so a retard can use it lol) - along with a limited walled garden of apps I love having the full web on my TV..

    I know ideally Google would like to see HTML5 replace Flash as the main internet format for videos. But the reality is that Flash is so well entrenched - that it will probably take a long time before HTML5 overtakes Flash.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  13. Scuzzo

    Scuzzo Active Member

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    what are the alternatives now? 5? will there be a new format? how long till we are dead in the water.. or is this just a bit alarmist.. will we turn on the net in a month and no vids will be in a playable format.. or will some one else fill the void.. some other developer come up with a vid format.. what is google game plan,,
    or were they just caught out.. and had no idea this end of flash support was coming? are we left with wifi door stops? how that for alarmist? ;)
     
  14. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    You're reading too much into Adobe's statement. This is the update:

    In other words, Adobe isn't going to support Flash within the browser for Google TV anymore. So, it would be up to Google whether or not to include the Flash content through Chrome after the 11.1 version is released for Google TV. Adobe doesn't have any say whether or not Google is removing Chrome from Google TV.

    Adobe is helping the HTML5 movement by forcing developers into making specific device applications to access Flash content from their website. By the way, Flash isn't just for movies. Web developers also on rely the ability develop applications for the Flash platform which has been cross-developed for many devices. One source code, many devices. Honestly, the FLV multimedia container which movies are stored on the web is only convenient because the Flash movieplayer is built and distributed with the Flash software.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  15. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Yes I understand that. However over time many web sites (with Flash Videos, flash ads etc.) will begin to not render smoothly on GTV. So my point was that eventually Google might be 'forced' to turn to only apps for GTV instead of a web browser. This being because Flash is so predominant on the internet. What good would a 'full web browser' be if Flash wasn't supported?
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  16. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    The iPad has a "full web browser" as opposed to a "mobile web browser". It is called Safari and it is built with the same Apple Webkit that Chrome is built around. As you may already know, the Adobe Flash software was never permitted on any iOS device. Ever. Which is why I have had a better web surfing experience on it than Google TV. However, access to specific content is limited, just as Silverlight isn't accessible through Chrome on Google TV.

    There are workarounds on the iPad, like the Skyfire Browser which is backed by Flash to H264/AVC transcoding servers. It allows anyone with an iOS device to watch Flash movies without having Flash installed. In other words, Steve Jobs was right, "supporting Flash natively isn't necessary to support the internet". Dependence on Flash only reinforces a dependence to Adobe. It is better to depend on an open standard than proprietary product when it comes to the longevity of access. His point is only reaffirmed with the news that Adobe is giving up on Flash Mobile. It is only a matter of time that web developers take this as a hint and move away from the platform entirely.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  17. CatfishRivers

    CatfishRivers Well-Known Member

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    Yes - open is the best way to go. It's good to see that YouTube is working on a HTML5 beta. However ultimately there will be some web sites that aren't necessarily 'Google TV friendly' (such as ESPN3 - that won't be in any hurry to abandon Flash. Will ESPN3 design a new HTML5 app for Google TV? - or will GTV users just be out of luck when ESPN and others update to the latest greatest version of Flash.?

    Flash is so well entrenched - that at least at the beginning if GTV has a web browser without Flash - I think the content options will be reduced. The workarounds might help - if they are available. Hopefully over time HTML5 will overtake Flash and all will be well.

    If GTV morphs into just a fancy version of Roku - I'll be buying a home theater PC.
     
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  18. eferz

    eferz Well-Known Member

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    It really is the same thing as content providers blocking Google TV. Especially for ESPN. ESPN has so many Android applications available to the ARM tablets and phones. They already have the best access with the XBox 360 that is better than ESPN3 on the PCs. So, if they don't actively pursue opening up content for other devices then it is their loss in viewership.

    That's always an option. Take a look at this Zotac 110821 ZBOX, Nextgen Ion, D525 2GDDR3. It's a pretty nice inexpensive little HTPC box.


     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2014
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