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3D: Americans Still Aren’t Buying It

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by Rickaren, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    3D: Americans Still Aren’t Buying It
    by Pete Putman

    January24,2011
    Nielsen’s latest report on American media device ownership and use is now available here, and it contains plenty of useful tidbits of market information.

    For example, the average American watches 35.6 hours of television a week, which is almost as much time as they spend at a full-time job. As for our constant obsession with ‘too much TV viewing’ for kids, we’re looking at the wrong age group: Children 2-11 watch about 26 hours a week, while adults over 65 are hooked to the boob tube almost 50 hours a week.

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    As far as media devices go, 75% of respondents own a computer with high-speed Internet, while 46% own at least one HDTV. Digital video recorders were next on the list (35% of respondents own one), followed by handheld media devices like iPods (20%), NeTVs (14%), peripheral devices with Internet video connections like Blu-ray players (10%), Netbooks (9%), E-book readers (5%), tablet computers (less than 3%) and 3D TVs (2%).

    About 116 million U.S. homes own at least one TV, with 105 million of them cable- or satellite-ready. 100 million homes have a DVD player, while (gasp!) 71 million still have a VCR. HD-compatible TVs are found in 65 million homes, and 56 million homes have digital cable TV service. In addition, 43 million have a digital video recorder.
    Are you following the cord-cutting stories? According to Nielsen, the number of homes equipped with broadband service but no cable TV is relatively small and unchanged through 2010 (about 4%), while homes that have both broadband and cable TV actually increased from 62% to 66% from January 2009 to January 2010.
    Another very interesting part of the study reveals that 76% of respondents ‘probably won’t or ‘definitely won’t’ buy a 3D TV in the next 12 months. 2% of respondents already own one, while only 6% “definitely’ or ‘probably’ will buy one. That’s not good news at all for TV manufacturers, who are currently struggling with profit margins and an ultra-competitive marketplace.


    The fact that 14% of respondents own a NeTV and 10% own some sort of connected peripheral indicates that focusing on connected TVs may be a better strategy for manufacturers in 2011. 3D is still a tough sell for any number of reasons, but NeTVs are appealing to just about everybody, particularly those keen on streaming movies and TV shows, even if they are in less-than-standard definition.

     
  2. rtalain

    rtalain New Member

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    I enjoy watching a 3D movie in theaters, but I think there's a lot working against it for residential use. Among other things, it needs to be glasses free in order for it to be widely accepted. For some systems, the glasses are $75 - $150 ea. If you have a Superbowl Party, are you really going to have 10-15 sets to give to everyone? If you don't, then some of your friends will be watching a blurry screen. Also, I think that Nintendo's announcement that their 3D DS system is not suitable for children under 6 because it can stunt the growth of their eyes may scare consumers out of taking the plunge into 3D in their homes, especially if they have small children.
     
  3. Rickaren

    Rickaren New Member Staff Member

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    ConsumerReports.org Unveils First Ratings of 3D TVs; Panasonic 3D Sets Among Best HD Models Ever Tested New Ratings of 20 3D-models and over 120 Plasma & LCD TVs

    YONKERS, N.Y., Jan. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In its first-ever Ratings of 3D TVs, ConsumerReports.org has found that the some of the best performing 3D-capable TVs were among the best overall HD performers. The Panasonic VT20 and VT25 plasma models were among the best HD sets that ConsumerReports.org has ever tested. In addition to excellent HD performance, they displayed the least ghosting with 3D programming, and achieved the highest overall scores in Consumer Reports 3D TV Ratings.
    The full report, which features Ratings of twenty 3D-capable TVs and more than 120 LCD and plasma HDTVs, is available online at www.ConsumerReports.org.
    "TV prices continue to drop even on models with a 3D mode," said Paul Reynolds, Electronics Editor of Consumer Reports. "Some of the models we tested performed exceptionally well in 2D mode so consumers may consider paying the premium for 3D-capability even if they do not plan on using the feature right now."
    Overall, most 3D sets were excellent or very good for HD. The 3D-capable LCD models displayed realistic, three-dimensional depth but visible ghosting detracted from the 3D effect. The Sony 3D TVs were best among the LCD models, but only when the viewer's head was perfectly level. In general, plasma sets exhibit less ghosting, which is when double images are visible even when wearing the special 3D glasses needed to see 3D images.
    In addition to scores for HD and SD picture quality, viewing angle, and sound quality, the 3D TV Ratings chart includes a score for 3D effect, and identifies how many pairs of glasses that come with each model.

    Other things to consider with 3D TV

    • 3D glasses are required. Current 3D TVs require active-shutter glasses, which can be both uncomfortable and pricey, generally costing about $130 to $150 a pair. Some 3D TVs come with one or two pairs but others don't come with any. ConsumerReports.org is beginning to test the first passive 3D TVs, which use lightweight, inexpensive, polarized 3D glasses, similar to those available at movie theaters.
    • 3D content is still limited. But more content, both 3D Blu-rays and 3D broadcasts, is on the way. Dozens of new 3D Blu-ray titles are expected in coming months and current 3D channels such as ESPN 3D and DirecTVs n3D will soon be joined by 3Net, a 24/7 3D channel from Discovery, IMAX and Sony. HBO and Vudu also recently added 3D content.
    • When to buy. 3D TVs make the most sense for early adopters or those who don't mind paying more for a new technology, or for those who are already in the market for a TV and who want to future-proof their purchase. Those looking for the absolute best HD performance should also consider a 3D model, even if they don't plan to use 3D immediately. A 3D TV is also an option for photo and video enthusiasts who expect to purchase a 3D camera or camcorder, and who'd like to look at these images on a larger screen. But those who don't need a new TV or who aren't dying for the 3D experience should bide their time, as they'll likely be rewarded with lower prices, more 3D content, and perhaps less-expensive, more comfortable glasses. Whether buying now or buying later, it's important for consumers to try-out 3D before buying a TV to make sure they are comfortable with the viewing experience.
    The complete feature report, "What's new in TVs," is currently available online at www.ConsumerReports.org and will be featured in the March 2011 issue of Consumer Reports available wherever magazines are sold on Tuesday, February 8th. It includes buying advice and Ratings of twenty 3D and more than 120 LCD and plasma TVs; an overview of different TV technologies and features such as LED backlights, 1080p resolution and 120HZ/240Hz; a listing of the most- and least-reliable TV brands; four unexpected ways to use a flat-panel TV; and an update on 3D glasses.

    MARCH 2011
    The material above is intended for legitimate news entities only; it may not be used for advertising or promotional purposes. Consumer Reports® is published by Consumers Union, an expert, independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to work for a fair, just, and safe marketplace for all consumers and to empower consumers to protect themselves. We accept no advertising and pay for all the products we test. We are not beholden to any commercial interest. Our income is derived from the sale of Consumer Reports,® ConsumerReports.org ® and our other publications and information products, services, fees, and noncommercial contributions and grants. Our Ratings and reports are intended solely for the use of our readers. Neither the Ratings nor the reports may be used in advertising or for any other commercial purpose without our permission. Consumers Union will take all steps open to it to prevent commercial use of its materials, its name, or the name of Consumer Reports.®
    SOURCE ConsumerReports.org


    I would never use Consumer Reports myself to determine ANY purchase! I have found "Discussion Groups" are the best reference, but that may just be me.


    Rick
     

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