Quantcast

10-Foot Optimized Websites - Design and Development Recommendations

Discussion in 'Google TV Development Discussion' started by Veeediot, Oct 18, 2010.

  1. Veeediot

    Veeediot New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Hi, all

    With Google TV coming out, I think there's going to be a big focus on TV-Sized websites. The term "10-foot experience" is getting thrown around as a catch-all for sites and applications developed for large screens.

    Google has recently updated their development and design recommendations document, which offers a lot of insight into how to make your website Google-TV ready. However, there's likely still a lot of issues they haven't covered, so I'd like to discuss them here.


    Here's a couple that I've been dwelling on...

    Firstly:
    Google TV isn't going to be the only 10-Foot web browsing experience. The Wii and PS3 both have web browsers, as does Boxee (albeit a poor one). Obviously someone creating a 10-Foot website isn't going to want to focus on only one platform. The design recommendations will mostly hold true over each (except maybe Wii), but things like auto-scaling may become an issue. Currently, YoutubeXL looks like it does a pretty good job of covering all platforms (note that Wii gets an entirely separate site), but I'm not sure if they're using a javascript auto-zoom or what. Compatibility on all TV platforms is definitely something to be wary of.

    Secondly:

    This is something I've more or less got sorted out, but I thought I'd bring it up since Google doesn't make much mention of it. In spatial (keyboard) navigation, focus is something you want to pay special attention to. It looks like the jQuery plugin takes care of focus for you, but you'll still want control over how focused elements look. In CSS, you can add "a:focus" to your "a:hover" blocks, and have both of them highlight the same way. If you're creating your own spatial navigation system, you'll be setting focus yourself using javascript each time a key is pressed.

    Thirdly:
    Websites that use Flash are going to require a smooth transition between Flash elements and regular HTML elements while navigating with arrow keys. Curiously, YoutubeXL does this fairly well, but the Google TV website does a terrible job of it. Note that you have to click a Flash object on the Google TV website before you can interact with it. I haven't tried it myself, but I speculate that setting focus on the Flash object from Javascript is enough for Flash to start picking up keyboard events to let you navigate through Flash buttons, but I'm not sure how one would lose that focus and go back into Javascript / HTML.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2010
  2. PhatboyC

    PhatboyC Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Ontario/Canada
    Didn't know YoutubeXL existed. Looks promissing. Strangely they where pushing Youtube Leanback with the Google TV? Which looks smoother but lacks search. Why two 10 foot optimized youtube sites from Google?
     
  3. Veeediot

    Veeediot New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    I'm pretty sure XL was made long before GoogleTV for whatever TV platforms might have supported web-browsing at the time (PS3 was probably their first priority). I think Leanback has a much better user-interface, but you'll note that it's entirely Flash-based. That's all fine and well for GoogleTV, but it means that Leanback probably won't work on other platforms such as PS3 which are running old versions of Flash Lite. That said, I haven't checked to see if Leanback works on PS3 yet, so it may very well be that XL is just obsolete.

    But the question still remains: do you develop entirely in Flash just for Google, or do you stick to HTML/Javascript and leave Flash for the simple things, like an AS2 video player (which is then fully PS3 compatible).
     
  4. PhatboyC

    PhatboyC Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Ontario/Canada
    Here is Engadget review of Leanback. I feel the same way. Prefer XL for now.

    "Now that Google has launched its TV platform, the YouTube interface designed to make browsing those vids similar to watching standard television has officially launched as well. YouTube Leanback is all about fullscreen video playing immediately, so if you bring it up on your Google TV device or just any regular web browser, don't be surprised to be launched immediately into whatever Google might think you're interested in based on previous views, subscriptions and favorites. The only difference we noted from several months ago is that it appears mouse support has been added. Honestly, we're feeling like may Google doesn't know us that well, since our initial experience didn't find many videos we actually wanted to watch among those recommended. There's no easy way to bring up videos you've previously watched or favorited, which, despite a rather effective search menu has us favoring YouTube XL for our ten-foot experience for now. Check out the site for yourself and let us know if you feel the same way."
    YouTube Leanback officially launches with Google TV -- Engadget HD
     
  5. Veeediot

    Veeediot New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    True enough. Leanback is obviously much more "TV-like" than XL in that you're able to visit the site, and without touching anything, sit back and watch hours of whatever Google wants you to see.

    I think there's some merit to that, in that it's a nice experience to be able to say "well let's see what's on next" before you reach for the remote and look for something specific. Unfortunately, it's lacking features that really define how a lot of people use YouTube. Lack of favorites and the inability to view videos based on user profile are big ones. I'm especially surprised that favorites are missing. I can't imagine it would be that difficult to throw it in at the bottom with the categories. It also removes some of the "surfing" behavior of YouTube in that you're directed towards a static list of videos in sequence rather than lists of related content that change as you jump around from video to video.

    Overall though, I'd say Leanback is on the right track. XL requires active engagement (typical of websites), while Leanback offers a choice between passive viewing, or actively searching. What they need to do now is fill in the gaps on the "active" side where favorites, user profiles and related content are missing.
     
  6. PhatboyC

    PhatboyC Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Ontario/Canada
    Sure would be great to set Leanback in some kind of music video stream category while entertaining guess! Instant VJ.

    A mode button should be added to go from constant play to something like XL where all the regular youtube option is available.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

optimized websites for ps3

,

ps3 optimized websites